Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Stick and Tissue Logo
 
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegister  
 
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
Ringmaster S-1 (Read 3649 times)
Reply #25 - Jun 22nd, 2010 at 5:58am

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 2790
*****
 
Nice patchwork. Good to hear that you got to fly.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
IP Logged
 
Reply #24 - Jun 20th, 2010 at 10:56pm

Black Lion   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
Carpentersville, IL

Posts: 255
****
 
A week ago, sunday, I was out at the club field flying the "Wurm" and as I came around the backside I was greeted by bird herd flying directly at me from the tall grass area beyond. I gave it full up to avoid them but one dirty bird smacked into the outboard wing and bounced off. When I landed I discovered that the tissue on the underside of the outboard wing had been popped by the kamikaze canary.  Angry

Our flying circles are about a 1/4 mile north of the R/C field and a couple of the R/C planes had a midair and one of them came down in the tall grass by the circle I was flying in. When it hit it spooked the birds which, luckily, were only sparrow sized.

Today I patched the puncture so thought I'd share photos of the steps and results.

First step is to cut the "flappy" part of the puncture away so that nothing can curl up under the patch. Next is to make a patch to cover the hole by tearing a piece of silkspan to the appropriate size. Tearing it gives you a frayed edge which will then blend onto the original surface. Once sanded with 400 grit the edges are nearly invisible. Next, you wet the patch thoroughly, dope the edges of the hole, apply the patch, dope the edges again and gently rub the patch edges until it's even and there are no wrinkles. After the tissue has dried then two coats of clear dope are applied; sanding with 400 grit after each coat has dried. Once it's dried then two coats of colored dope (white in this case) are applied over the patch and the surrounding area. As you can see the patch is practically invisible even though the dope was still wet when the last pic was taken.

 

patchjob.JPG (62 KB | )
patchjob.JPG
IP Logged
 
Reply #23 - May 6th, 2010 at 1:58am

John Webster   Offline
Full Member
Stick & Tissue
Painesville, Ohio

Posts: 145
***
 
When I was a teenager the Ringmaster was what you built when you got your first .35 and 50 foot steel lines. It was like the transition from knickers to long pants.

I got a Jr. Nobler instead but Ringmasters were good flying machines.

Nice job on the re-creation.
 

When you begin to fly you are issued two bags, one full of luck and an empty one for experience.&&The object is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck.
IP Logged
 
Reply #22 - May 3rd, 2010 at 6:39am

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 2790
*****
 
Nice trim scheme. Tastefull. Thanks for shareing that with us.
Good looking plane.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
IP Logged
 
Reply #21 - May 2nd, 2010 at 11:34pm

Black Lion   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
Carpentersville, IL

Posts: 255
****
 
Almost done. Still need to trim the nose and add some other pieces of hardware but this is about what it'll look  like when completed.
 

Rm08.JPG (105 KB | )
Rm08.JPG
IP Logged
 
Reply #20 - Apr 27th, 2010 at 7:00am

Black Lion   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
Carpentersville, IL

Posts: 255
****
 
That plotter printer was a pen plotter. Flatbed, X-Y, used for CAD drawings.  It was a 24"x36" bed. Could have laid the balsa right in there and drew right on it straight from the puter.

Back then I was running an MM-1 computer under OS9/68000 (similar to Unix) and it would have interfaced with no problem. if you don't know what OS9 is...it's what they use to run most auto computers. True multi-tasking..great operating system and extremely flexible and crash proof. The Mac OS-10 is a GUI form of OS9 which makes it so smooth, fast and crashproof.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #19 - Apr 26th, 2010 at 7:39pm

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 2790
*****
 
I like the art work. I think the plane looks great.
Dont know what a plotter printer is. I know that there is a banner printer in my future. [ Someday ]
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
IP Logged
 
Reply #18 - Apr 26th, 2010 at 1:49pm

Black Lion   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
Carpentersville, IL

Posts: 255
****
 
Well, here it sits with the decals on but still lacking trim. Chose the name cuz I liked the picture and the "WURM" stands for "Worlds Ugliest RingMaster".
 

Rm07.JPG (66 KB | )
Rm07.JPG
IP Logged
 
Reply #17 - Apr 26th, 2010 at 9:18am

Black Lion   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
Carpentersville, IL

Posts: 255
****
 
Many moons ago I was at a hamfest and someone there had a plotter printer sitting on their table. I was interested but really didn't have a use for it back then. That thing would have been kicka** to have now!
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #16 - Apr 24th, 2010 at 8:24pm

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 2790
*****
 
Yes, Many ways. I used to photo copy and glue stick the paper to the wood and cut. I got the carbon paper on the bay' crazy cheap.
Whatever works for you is best.
Follow the plan stan,
There must be,
50 ways to build an airplane.   Grin Grin
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
IP Logged
 
Reply #15 - Apr 24th, 2010 at 2:14pm

Charlieman   Offline
Full Member
Stick & Tissue
Ft. Bragg   CA

Posts: 236
***
 
I have friend who builds solid models for his art projects (He did the annual Schnieder Cup re-enactment posters for the Dessert Hawk's R/C float contests).  Anyway, he would xerox the plans or scale drawings and then place those face down on the work piece. then swab laquer thinner thru the back of the print. This would trnsfer the outlines directly onto the balsa. To get a positive image, sometimes he would have the copy printied in reverse,then apply as above. Another way is to iron the backside, instead of swabbing, the heat of the iron will transfer the toner.

One of the things I enjoy about this and related hobbies/interests is the various methods different people employ and exchange to aid the work!
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #14 - Apr 24th, 2010 at 1:22pm

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 2790
*****
 
Gotcha' I use carbon paper. Trace onto the wood.
Thanks fro the link.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
IP Logged
 
Reply #13 - Apr 24th, 2010 at 9:36am

Charlieman   Offline
Full Member
Stick & Tissue
Ft. Bragg   CA

Posts: 236
***
 
I believe he's speaking about a clear plastic material that one places over a plan part drawing and scores with a knife along the part outline. Once scored, the excess is "snapped" away, leaving a template of the part and saving your plan from being cut up.

This type of product has been around for quite a few years. However, it genrally still needs to be sanded as freehand scoring  yeilds inconsistent results. One could use  striaght edges and plastic French curves to help guild the knife while cutting but that introduces new problems and skills to master.

I usually try to get a second copy of the plan, or just important portions of it, to mount with rubber cement (won't distort the paper and is removable) to suitable template material. Cereral box  carboard, thin ply ,  aluminum, or brass are some good template materials.  It can also be mounted directly on the part material. Then cut/sanded to the line. A little acetone or laquer thinner will remove it.



 
IP Logged
 
Reply #12 - Apr 24th, 2010 at 9:20am

Black Lion   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
Carpentersville, IL

Posts: 255
****
 
thymekiller wrote on Apr 24th, 2010 at 6:56am:
Gotta ask what is See Temp ? Do you cut templates for all your parts first, then make the parts?


http://www.seetemp.com
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #11 - Apr 24th, 2010 at 6:56am

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 2790
*****
 
Gotta ask what is See Temp ? Do you cut templates for all your parts first, then make the parts?
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print