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Wing outline (Read 4754 times)
Reply #8 - Dec 20th, 2011 at 11:38pm

Charlieman   Offline
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The two best known tri-planes of WWI, the Sopwith, and the plane it inspired the Fokker DrI, are actually attempts to capitalize on the higher effective aspecte ratio afforded by three narrow chord wings with spans comparable to similar biplanes.
 
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Reply #7 - Dec 20th, 2011 at 4:39am

Sky9pilot   Online
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Here's a high aspect ratio wing... Hurel-Dubois HD-10

Tom
 

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Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #6 - Jun 30th, 2011 at 9:41pm

Black Lion   Offline
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faif2d wrote on Jun 27th, 2011 at 7:00pm:
 On CL combat planes the high aspect ratio planes would slow down less in consecutive maneuvers.  This effect was apparent even with the high power to weight ratio that they had.



The "Whipsaw" and "Super Whipsaw" were prime examples of this.
 
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Reply #5 - Jun 30th, 2011 at 10:46am

Charlieman   Offline
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There are a lot of anti-vortex tips to be seen on full size aircraft. More modern high wing Cessnas typically have a tip that bends down and grows wider toward the trailing edge.

Anti-vortex tips were not generally in vogue when planes like the Moskito were being designed. However, most WWI types show a pnchant for a rather common tip shape.

I once worked for a Piper dealer who also sold various mods for the Comache.  He promoted a singular Fibreglas anti-vortex design which was very similar to the Cessna type. It's purpose to disipate the vortex somewhat, thus increase efficiency/speed.

Later he also sold a vortex inducing tip. This seemingly opposit choice actually sought to tighten up the vortex, so that overall better efficiency was attained. AFAIK, he still sells both tip styles.

About that time winglets began to appear on various aircraft, still seen on sailplanes to airliners.

Larger aircraft produce larger vorteses and can be a major contributor to wind shear issues near airports, long after the plane has passed.  My father used to fly a Stits Playboy, a small low wing homebuilt. He was landing at Merced, CA not long after a WWII B-17 had taken off. As he neared touch down. a lingering vrtex from the departing aircraft slammed him onto the tarmak. No injuries  and the plane eventually flew again but it scared him pretty good!
 
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Reply #4 - Jun 28th, 2011 at 8:53pm

thymekiller   Offline
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Ok. Lets talk tips.  Is there a reason all wings dont have those tips on the end to "hold" the air from slipping off?  Vortexes are a mystery to me.

I have always admired the wing outline on the British Mosquito.  It just seems correct for the job.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #3 - Jun 28th, 2011 at 7:18pm

Charlieman   Offline
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TK

Don't confuse drag for efficiency. Many racers have low aspect ratio wings. Many WWII fighter flown at Reno have thier wings shortened (effectively lowering the aspect ratio) to reduce frontal area/drag.

generally speaking, aircraft with high aspect ratio wings are more efficient at producing lift because they delay the outward spanwise airlow from spilling  up and over the tip. That difference in preasure, between the lower surface and the upper is what produces the tip vortex. That vortex produces drag.

Any aircraft is a conglomerate of compromises. Reasonable trade-offs to obtain the desired performance or utility. Sometimes the trade-offs are clearly discernable, others take some investigation.
 
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Reply #2 - Jun 27th, 2011 at 9:56pm

thymekiller   Offline
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So would it be safe to say that, generally speaking, a low aspect wing has more drag?   Is that why they tend to be used more in slower planes?
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #1 - Jun 27th, 2011 at 7:00pm

faif2d   Offline

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Aspect ratio is just that the ratio between the chord length and the span length.  For example a 10" chord with a 30" span would have an aspect ratio of 3 to 1.  The longer or higher aspect ratio are more efficient until they get really large.  Think gliders for high aspect ratios and jets like the Phantom for low aspect ratios.  Jets can get away with the low aspect ratios because they have so much power.  On CL combat planes the high aspect ratio planes would slow down less in consecutive maneuvers.  This effect was apparent even with the high power to weight ratio that they had.
 
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Jun 27th, 2011 at 4:34pm

thymekiller   Offline
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Seems to me that planes with long thin wings fly faster than ones with short , large chord wings. 
I think the thinner ones are High aspect?  Don't know the definition of aspect except with vs length
Anybody?.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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