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Can you name this plane? (Read 247841 times)
Reply #1259 - Jul 25th, 2017 at 2:33pm

Sky9pilot   Online
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My bad...let's run with Kiwi's...
This reminds me of the Short Seamew
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #1258 - Jul 24th, 2017 at 5:51pm

Kiwi   Offline
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While we are waiting for Tom's contribution here is another ugly one for you all.
Nev
« Last Edit: Jul 25th, 2017 at 10:38pm by Kiwi »  

download.jpg (6 KB | 10 )
download.jpg

Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with Fancy Watches
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Reply #1257 - Jul 16th, 2017 at 7:16pm

Kiwi   Offline
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Thats it.

The Saro A.33 was built to the same Air Ministry Specification (R.2/33) as the Short Sunderland - calling for a long-range reconnaissance and patrol flying-boat. The contract for one prototype (K4773) was placed in 1934-35 and construction started late in 1936. The A.33 was completed in September 1938 and the first taxi-ing trials were carried out on 10th, 11th and 12th October. On 14th October the A.33 was airborne for the first time, at an all-up-weight of 31,000 lb. After some half a dozen flights, K4773 was seriously damaged through "porpoising" at high-speed in the Solent. As the result of a heavy hull/water impact, the fabric-covered, all-metal wing failed in torsion at a position in line with the inner starboard Perseus. The starboard wing then twisted about the single main spar and the starboard inner airscrew ripped into the hull and sponson, while detached structure damaged the tail assembly. As the damage was above the water-line, the A.33 did not sink and it was towed back to the East Cowes slipway.
This unique British example of the sponson flying-boat was not repaired
The wing failed after the aircraft hit the wake of a Southampton ferry while on a take-off run, the A.33 began to porpoise severely,
porpoising was a problem with the aircraft, the A.33 leapt into the air and came down out of control in a stalled condition. At impact
the wing failed in torsion at a point inline with the starboard inner engine which caused the starboard leading edge to pivot around
the single-spar driving the propeller into the fuselage and sponson, missing designer Henry Knowler by inches.
 

Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with Fancy Watches
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Reply #1256 - Jul 16th, 2017 at 5:25pm

Sky9pilot   Online
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Tough picture to tell exact specifications but I believe it's the Saunders-Roe A.33
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #1255 - Jul 16th, 2017 at 4:57pm

Kiwi   Offline
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Perhaps I need to slow down to give others a shot?
 

2094.jpg (34 KB | 11 )
2094.jpg

Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with Fancy Watches
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Reply #1254 - Jul 16th, 2017 at 4:04pm

Sky9pilot   Online
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Yep it's the spartan cruiser!  Well done. Smiley
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #1253 - Jul 16th, 2017 at 10:07am

bigrip74   Offline
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WOW! Smiley kiwi, I was still looking for a junkers.
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #1252 - Jul 16th, 2017 at 4:19am

Kiwi   Offline
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Spartan Cruiser?
 

Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with Fancy Watches
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Reply #1251 - Jul 15th, 2017 at 5:53pm

Sky9pilot   Online
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Ok, how about this one?
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #1250 - Jul 15th, 2017 at 3:50pm

Kiwi   Offline
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Thats the one, looking forward to the next challenge.
 

Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with Fancy Watches
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Reply #1249 - Jul 15th, 2017 at 3:14pm

pb_guy   Offline
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Good catch. I couldn't find it listed under any aircraft in the RAF, so I was puzzled that they had the roundels. Apparently there is a model plan of it - Peanut Scale! -  by Fillion http://outerzone.co.uk/plan_details.asp?ID=1436
ian
 
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Reply #1248 - Jul 15th, 2017 at 11:00am

Sky9pilot   Online
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De Havilland D.H.67/Gloster AS31 Survey

When the Aircraft Operating Company acting on behalf of the Ordnance Survey requested a replacement fr their D.H.9's they approached De Havilland. The requirement was for an all metal aircraft that could operate from land and on floats and could maintain a level flight at 9,000 ft fully loaded on one engine. De Havilland designed the D.H.67, but as a company they were far too busy with production of the Hercules and the Moth so passed the project over to Gloster as A.S.31 Survey. It made it's first flight in June 1929 and was handed over to the Air Operating Company on 25th January 1930. It was used to survey Rhodesia and later South Africa. It was later sold to the South African Air Force and used for aerial surveys until it was broken up at Waterkloof in December 1942. One other model was built for the Air Ministry and used by the R.A.E. at Farnborough until 1936.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #1247 - Jul 15th, 2017 at 12:53am

Kiwi   Offline
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First flew June 1929, only two were built, one remained in service until 1936, the other was sold in March 1935 and was broken up in 1942
« Last Edit: Jul 15th, 2017 at 1:55am by Kiwi »  

Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with Fancy Watches
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Reply #1246 - Jul 14th, 2017 at 11:25pm

pb_guy   Offline
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So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

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This one is a problem. I don't believe that it is WWI at all. Possibly 1920's? Have a hint for us?
ian
 
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Reply #1245 - Jul 11th, 2017 at 9:22pm

Kiwi   Offline
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pb_guy wrote on Jul 11th, 2017 at 8:47am:
It does have a fair resemblance to the Sikorsky S-29-A?
ian

Given the markings on it,  most unlikely Smiley
 

Pilots without Mechanics are just Pedestrians with Fancy Watches
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