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The Stinson 105 tutorial for beginners (Read 17172 times)
Reply #31 - Nov 23rd, 2016 at 4:18pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
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Cicero,
Making your own balsa stripper is always fun option.  There are inexpensive adjustable balsa strippers available...here's a link to our Gadgets section for making stick and tissue construction easier: Click Here
Master Airscrew Balsa Stripper can be purchased here: Click Here Tower Hobbies

Not all plans have formers and extra parts on a print sheet.  You'll usually find somewhere on the plans the outlines for ribs and other parts are shown in the drawings to conserve paper space.  Check out the plans closely.  Sometimes the parts were on printed balsa sheet and weren't included in the plans.  I usually use my three in one copier/printer/scanner to make a copy of the print sheet for later use in replacing broken parts etc.  or for a later build of another model. 

Usually the plan will print out full size in poster print setting on your printer.  This will "Tile" the plan onto multiple sheet that can be trimmed on two edges to tape the plan together giving the full size plan.  You don't want to use the "fit to sheet" option on your plan or it will reduce the size of the plan too much. 

If you want it larger there is an option on some printers to increase the % of print you desire. This will allow enlargement and/or reduction of print size. 

The Stinson was built from plans from the Plans Gallery on HPA site.  I don't recall off the top of my head re: a print balsa sheet. 

If you're interested in building from plans (sometime called building from scratch) you'll find many plans available here, on HPA and Outerzone and several other plan sites for free plans... some magazines have the rights to the plans that were presented in their magazines and still have the plans forsale available.  If you find one you want to build get your plan, start a thread and you'll find more help available than you'll know what to do with! Grin Wink
Tom
« Last Edit: Apr 10th, 2017 at 5:46pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #30 - Nov 22nd, 2016 at 9:43pm

pb_guy   Offline
Senior Member
So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 620
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Hi Cicero. The parts were likely printed on a 1/16" sheet of balsa that you had to cut up. Thus there are no ribs/formers on the plan. You can approximate the sizes and shapes of pieces, but unless you have some drafting experience, it would be better to go with a plan that does have complete templates for every part. As for making stringers, I assume you mean: how do you make square stock, like 1/16" x 1/16". Answer; make a balsa stripper. The basic idea is to use a piece of a razor blade epoxied on top of a piece that is the thickness that you wish to strip. Make the supports just slightly further apart than the stock being stripped. Angle the razor blade at 30 to 40 °.
ian
 

microstrip.gif (3 KB | 22 )
microstrip.gif
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Reply #29 - Nov 22nd, 2016 at 8:53pm

Cicero   Offline

Melbourne, Australia

Posts: 10
 
-mini bump-
Hey, I was looking to get into building from scratch, and was wondering- does it matter what size you print the plans, or the size of the paper? And also, some plans don't come with templates for the parts, so what can be done in this instance (e.g, this plan http://www.stickandtissue.com/yabbfiles/Attachments/AlliedSport.pdf) the plan seems to reference part numbers, but I see no template for the parts. I'd also like to ask what is the best way to go about making stringers. Sorry for my ignorance, and thanks in advance
 

I enjoy graphic design, graphite drawings and recently, building with balsa!
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Reply #28 - Nov 8th, 2016 at 12:18am

Prang   Offline

Twin Jetex motors for
JATO. That could work...
UK

Posts: 3
 
In my (limited) experience, models that look this nice are best kept just for looking at. Certainly, if I had built a model as attractive as this, I'd find it hard to entrust it to the questionable mercies of my local flying site, where any passing dog might think it was a thrown stick, and cheerfully 'retrieve it' for me.

Scale models, at this small scale, are drag buckets (those struts...) and tend to have a heavy tail. As far as I know that is just about inescapable. If intended for flight I would have been tempted to scale the plans up, in search of a sweet spot. It isn't twice as much work to build twice as big...

Then again, if I scaled it up I'd be tempted to motorise it, with lightweight radio gear, just to keep it out of the trees... and that would be cheating!
 
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Reply #27 - Apr 24th, 2015 at 1:12pm

bigrip74   Offline
Global Moderator
What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 4555
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Hello John, and welcome to S&T. Do you have any photos of the Stinson in flight to share?

bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #26 - Apr 24th, 2015 at 11:25am

John Murphy   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Virginia, USA

Posts: 2
 
Correction:  I moved the motor peg forward one bay, not two (I should have looked at the model!).

John
 
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Reply #25 - Apr 24th, 2015 at 10:55am

John Murphy   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Virginia, USA

Posts: 2
 
I just joined Stick and Tissue today and was delighted to see the Stinson 105 tutorial. I built two examples from the plans and wish I had seen the tutorial first!  On the second version, I moved the rear peg forward two bays to improve c/g, used a Regal adjustable front end, and made the slot for the stab wider at the front to allow use of a shim for trimming (I glued the stab in only at the trailing edge). I use 1/8" rubber for outdoor flights and .100" or .105" for indoors.  I am amazed that the model flies so well with the "tiny" scale stab.
 
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Reply #24 - Jan 28th, 2014 at 1:10pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
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Just a second thought on the covering process with tissue.  I mentioned using a razor to trim around the components after the tissue has been applied and shrunk.  Please note that sometimes the trimmed tissue is not completely trimmed right next to the balsa framework.  This can leave straggly edges.  Usually there's enough gluestick still on the edge to stick down the ragged edge.  I've found that saliva works really well in  reactivating the gluestick and sticking down the straggly, ragged edges.  I go over all the joints in this manner.  If saliva is too much for you, you can dip you finger in isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol) and smooth the edges.  The alcohol reactivates the gluestick also.  But please be sparing in using the alcohol. Too much wets the tissue too much and causes it to tear.  A little goes along way here!  This leaves a nice smooth joint that can you can shrink again if needed, with a light spritz of alcohol. I usually buy a couple bottles at the Dollar Store from time to time.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #23 - Jan 26th, 2014 at 5:27pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
*****
 
Wrapped things up today.  Finished the windows with the cellophane wrapping.  Cut a complete panel for all the side windows using the plans as a pattern.  I cut it approximately 1/16 inch oversized and used white glue to place the window panes.  This glue dries clear and shows the detail below.
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  Once the side windows were completed, I added the wing struts. The white tissue seems to be almost transparent on the solid balsa parts.  I don't know why the gluestick makes the tissue do this.  The struts are covered in the tissue on all sides.  I just cut a rectangle big enough to cover both struts on one side with approximately 1/8 border on the outside edges.  I then used the glue stick directly on the tissue as it laid on a piece of copy/printer paper.  Once the glue was applied I laid the struts on the tissue and split the tissue between the struts.  I then proceeded to wrap the tissue around the struts trimming the tissue so it didn't overlap the tissue from the other side of the strut.  Basically one piece wrapped completely around the strut.  Much easier to do than to type out the process.  I then used a pin to prick small holes thru the tissue to the balsa where the struts attach. Then I used thin cyano to attach the struts.
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I found an old prop in the prop drawer, 5.5" diameter.  I think the usual formula for props is around 1/3 the wingspan of the model.  So this one is a bit oversized. I may have to make a replacement or cut this one down later.
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Here's some pictures of the finished model.
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Till thing warm up here, I'll be tossing her on the bed and see how she glides. Then we'll go from there.
So we'll call this a build and will update the flying later.
Tom
« Last Edit: Jan 26th, 2014 at 6:38pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #22 - Jan 25th, 2014 at 5:58pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
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Bit more work done this afternoon...panel lines and windshield.  I use Aleene's Fast Grab Tackey Glue from Wally World (Walmart) It's very similar to canopy glue and dries clear.  Although I've found that in this colder climate it takes a bit more time to dry, and hold as it does in warmer climates.
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Here's a couple pictures of the windshield being held in place with hairclips and clothespin.  You'll notice I left the top panel between the wing roots uncovered to allow access to the windshield for clamping it down.  Also the side windows are left to last. 
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Had to hold the windshield in front of the heater to get the glue to start setting up.  Once the windshield dries I'll apply the side windows, I'll be using a clear cellophane used to wrap a package or from donut boxes etc.  Save this material because it comes in very handy for modeling.  Once all the work on the fuselage is completed I'll add the wingstruts.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #21 - Jan 25th, 2014 at 2:44pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
*****
 
Time for confessions...do as I say and not as I do.  In my hurry to mockup the model I forgot to do the panel lines while the wings were off the fuselage etc.  Really makes using the Fine tip Sharpie panel lines easier!!! Embarrassed Cry Undecided

So now that I've confessed, here's some pictures of the markings cut from printer paper from a picture from the net.  I'd usually print this on tissue and then cut out and mount, got lazy! Roll Eyes Tongue.  On most models I would print on tissue.  I made the side stripe from red tissue cut with straight edge and applied with glue stick on the back of the stripe.  I lined it up first and then pressed in place with gentle pressure with my finger tip. 

I started to do the panel lines but the fingers were a bit shakey, too much coffee this morning. It was cold!  Shocked Grin Wink

Here's some shots of the markings....
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #20 - Jan 23rd, 2014 at 9:03pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
*****
 
Got to sand the spats and cover them with tissue today...
Here's one sanded and one still to sand.  I used some rough grit and then emery boards to finish up the sanding.  The fine emery board is approximately 300 grit. Gives a nice smooth finish.  I cover the spats with tissue and gluestick.  I double covered the spats because they looked like they weren't covered with the first layer. 
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Once covered I mounted the wheels with music wire instead of straight pins.  Had the wire, couldn't fine the pins after the move!! Embarrassed Roll Eyes Huh
I cut spacers from acetate to place on each side of the wheels inside the spats.  Not fun but keeps the wheels rolling and from binding inside the spats.  I used a hole punch and some clear acetate from a packing box.
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I also finished the nose and prop button.  I've found these adjustable prop buttons from A2Z.  Once assembled they allow adjustment from the backside with two sizes of plastic wrenches included in the nose button.  There is an additions backing plate but it's too large for this size model.
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Once the spats were finished and wheels mounted it was time to mount on the struts.  I used some thick cyano acrylate glue (super glue) to secure the music wire on the backside of the main struts.  this will be sanded smooth tomorrow and covered with tissue.
Here's how she looks with prop button, spats and gear...
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Still need to finish the wing struts and main gear strut braces and the windows and windshield.  Then the markings...That's what make the plane come alive!!
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #19 - Jan 22nd, 2014 at 7:02pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
*****
 
Now to what I call the "Fiddly Bits", landing gear (struts gear/wing,main wheels, tail/nose wheel) and any rigging.

I was able to use my olfa circle cutter to cut the laminations in the wheel spats for clearing the wheels before adding the outside laminations.
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Once the inner lamination were cut out, I then glued the outer laminations on the inner laminations, closing the spats.  I then clamped them together with large emery files on the outside to keep them from being crushed by the clamps.  I was a bit disappointed with the glue not setting up as fast as usual.  Must be the cold up here in the Pacific Northwest! Tongue Undecided So no sanding of the spats. 
On to the wheels...
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Using the Olfa circle cutter I cut discs for the wheels (four discs total) and laminated them cross grain. I used super glue for the additional stiffness it provides in the inner lamination and not having to wait another day to finish the wheels. Once the glue was set I used a nail file/emery board to round the edges of the discs. Being this is just a dime scale airplane I didn't spend a large amount of time on the wheels.  On larger models and more detailed builds I would turn them on a dremel tool or variable speed hand drill.  But that's for another build.  Here's a link to some fancy wheels done very well! reply #76 http://www.hippocketaeronautics.com/hpa_forum/index.php?topic=14072.75

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Here's my wheels, I used broad tip Sharpie permanent pen black for the tires and on the tail wheel I used a silver felt marker to simulate the rear tail strut.  I used the circle cutter for cutting out circles for the wheel hubs from copy paper.
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While waiting on  the spats to dry thoroughly I moved on to the main gear struts.  These were cut using the paper pattern from the plan and gluesticked to the balsa 1/16 sheet . Just remember there's a right one and a left one and the top of the strut is different front and back.  I covered the strut with tissue and sanded an angle on the top where it mounts to the lower longeron. I used super glue (cyano acrylic) to glue on the struts. I made sure to use a pin to prick some holes thru the tissue into the balsa longeron so the glue will have something to bite on to when the strut is glued to the longeron.
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Now to wait on the spats for the glue to set up!  Then the axles through the spats wheels and mount to the main strut. Then add the cross braces.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #18 - Jan 21st, 2014 at 8:49pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
*****
 
With the wing panels I start on the bottom of the wing again applying gluestick liberally on all the outer edges and bottom of the leading and trailing edges and wing tip and root.  I don't put it on the rib bottoms on this small of a model.  Larger models I will apply it to the rib bottoms as well. 
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I make relief cuts along the tip to allow the tissue to lay down easier and the root corners.
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Once the tissue is wrapped around the edges, I trim the excess off with the single edge razor as with the fuselage.  Again be careful to allow it to wrap around the outside edges of the wing.
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Once the bottom is done I turn the panel over and apply the gluestick to the top of he wing and I do apply it to the rib tops as well as the outside edges over the tissue that is wrapped over from the bottom.
Once both wing panels are covered (I covered the wing panels with dry tissue.) I then spritzed them with the isopropyl alcohol on both sides and pinned them to the board to dry with a little assistance with the hairdryer.
The first attempt at drying didn't go well and there were some wrinkles.  So I respritzed the tops of the panels and used the dryer and a bit more heat in the dryer.  Wrinkles almost completely gone! Grin Wink
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From the wing panels to the vertical Stab...
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Once both sides covered it was spritzed and pinned to the board like the wing panels.
The horizontal stab was done just like the vertical stab.  I blew it and forgot to take pics of that process.
I can't resist mockups, so with all the components covered I pinned them together and took a few pictures.
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Now to the fiddly bits, landing gear, struts etc. Those next...
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #17 - Jan 21st, 2014 at 8:06pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 7651
*****
 
Tissue application starting with the fuselage....

I must clarify that frequently I don't apply domestic tissue wet because of it's lack of strength.  Especially the tissue that I've purchased from The Dollar Store and other craft stores. It just tends to fall apart in your hands or when you pull on it to remove wrinkles.  So I usually apply it dry and pull out the wrinkles as I go working from one end to the other of the component. (fuselage or wing)

Hallmark Cards has some very good domestic tissue I've used their black and their purple.  Nice grain and strength. 

Here we go with the fuselage.  I start on the bottom so that all the overlaps of tissue is facing down.  The seams are less visible later.  I use the regular white glue stick and I put it on the balsa wood liberally.  (A lot) because I want this to stick the tissue down and especially when the tissue is applied wet.  I did apply this tissue wet and it was very easy to tear it.  I used one strip to cover the bottom.  Make sure the grain of the tissue runs across the width of the fuselage, not the length. This will aid in the shrinking of the tissue to remove the wrinkles.
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As you will see, the tissue went on ok but tore in a couple of places.  This is because of the looser grain than some other tissue.  It was applied wet and then I used a hair dryer to dry the tissue after it was securely stuck down.
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My fix was to double cover the bottom nose area from the former under the cabin to the nose with a second sheet of tissue.  This was done by cutting a sheet of tissue the appropriate size allowing some hang over on the outer longeron. I applied glue stick on the back of the tissue and applied it directly to the dry tissue very carefully avoiding pushing too heavily as I smoothed it in place.
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One tear needed a patch over the second layer.  I cut an oval patch, you want to avoid corners in a patch they don't lay down and they seem to show more than rounded edges. Can you see the patch?
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Now we move to the sides of the fuselage.  I cut a strip from the tissue sheet after making sure the side of the fuselage will be covered with enough overlap, approximately 1/2 inch each way. The grain needs to run from top to the bottom. (my preference to tighten the tissue and eliminate wrinkles vertically)
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I was able to use the other half of this strip for the other side of the fuselage. Once the side is applied I dried it with the hairdryer and then used a single edge razor to trim the excess tissue away from the fuselage.  This take time and trial and error to perfect.  It's different for each one.  I know that some wait for the tissue to dry completely and using fine sand paper sand the edge gently while pulling on the excess tissue. I prefer the single edge razor. Now because you've applied the gluestick liberally your razor will begin to collect the excess glue.  You'll need to clean your razor with alcohol because it dries on the razor dulling it and tearing the tissue.  I use my spritzer bottle sprayed on the paper towel to clean the razor. 
Be very careful! and don't cut yourself cleaning the razor!!!

Now on to the wings...

« Last Edit: Feb 1st, 2014 at 10:47pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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