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If you've never built a model before. (Read 1568 times)
Reply #8 - Sep 15th, 2018 at 8:12am

staubkorb   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
Germany

Posts: 1285
****
 
Same ratios, or whatever "works" for you.  Acetone, from any source will work just fine but I prefer to get mine from auto paint outlets - fewer impurities and stronger.

UHU Hart is VERY strong and FAST drying!  Very difficult to sand when used straight out of the tube.  I DO prefer it over any of the other solvent based glues (when thinned).
 

WWWoFF
Wonderful Wacky World of Free Flight
(with a bit of rc thrown in for giggles)

Comparing Spammers to a pile of organic waste is an insult to the organic waste!
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Reply #7 - Sep 13th, 2018 at 11:58am

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 9844
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I've never used the UHU tube cement so can't really make a recommendation on that.  Anyone else use the UHU tube cement and dilute it?
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #6 - Sep 12th, 2018 at 6:57pm

Aerophile   Offline

Ringmaster Master
North Carolina

Posts: 13
 
Sky9pilot, thank you for the advice.  I have a large supply of Duco and would like to use it up.  One other question, do you use this ratio for the UHU tube cement as well?
Amen to your signature.
Rick😎
 
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Reply #5 - Sep 12th, 2018 at 5:26pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 9844
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Rick,
I use the generic acetone in the quart can that was purchased at Home Depot or Lowes, don't remember which. 

I generally thin my Duco/Acetone 50/50 for use in my balsa wood construction.  I use the double glue technique...this is where glue is places on both parts to be glued and left to set for a minute or so.  Then additional drop of glue applied to one piece and the two are joined together and pinned or held in place with magnets till dry.  This seems to work really well, but the joints need to be very flush fitting.  It doesn't fill gaps so the joints need to fit very tight. 

Otherwise just a great all around glue.
Sky9pilot
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #4 - Sep 12th, 2018 at 5:15pm

Aerophile   Offline

Ringmaster Master
North Carolina

Posts: 13
 
I am interested in something mentioned here and else where about one of my fav types of glue....DUCO.  I have built S&T as a youth and used the then good ole Testors Balsa Cement.
I have used SIGment for CL.  Now this might get a chuckle, but DUCO is one of my go to f/Card modeling.  Please enlighten as to how to use f/balsa.  I have tubes of as well as UHU thats very much like the DUCO.  Love this stuff.  Acetone, what type?
Thanks for any tips.
Rick😎
 
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Reply #3 - Jul 2nd, 2018 at 9:51am

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 9844
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Balsawood is the major wood used for Stick and Tissue construction. Most modelers use the 4 to 6 pound balsa (often called "Contest Balsa" which most balsa suppliers will send you upon request.   You'll find the wood description in more detail Click Here
Some very thin aircraft ply is used as well.  1/64", 1/32" and 1/16" sheet.  For noseblock facing and former facing. This is a harder surface for removable noseblocks so the softer balsa isn't worn down by the removal of the nose block for winding motors and other high stress areas of a model.  Hope this was helpful.

Most hobby shop and other specialty stores like Michaels that have balsawood available but it's usually harder and heavier in the 9 lb/sq in range.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #2 - Jul 2nd, 2018 at 9:45am

pb_guy   Offline
Senior Member
So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 1172
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Hi Michael. Whenever wood is mentioned in connection with models, unless otherwise specified, it is always balsa. But not all balsa is created equal. The way that the wood is cut and its density will affect its strength and weight. The best way to get your feet wet with building is with a kit. All the necessary materials for construction are provided, except for glue and paint. However, the model built from the kit might not fly as well as you might expect.
ian
 
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Reply #1 - Jul 2nd, 2018 at 1:34am

MichaelJ   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!

Posts: 3
 
I am absolutely a beginner to the aircraft model building. Here you have provided a detailed list of items needed to build a stick and tissue model. Thanks for that. Wood is the basic material used to build the stick and tissue model. Can you give information about which type of wood will be most suitable to build the model?
 

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Mar 2nd, 2016 at 11:31am

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 9844
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This section is to help you in discovering the "how to's" of stick and tissue model building.  From building a kit you can purchase to building from a plan (scratch building).  We'll give you suggestions on tools needed, building boards, and various processes of getting a successful Free Flight model in the air! Check out the Spitfire and Stinson tutorials for some basics.

You'll need some tools to build your model so here's a list:
Just wanted to list the minimum of tools you'll need to get started in the modeling experience.
Tool:
Scissors for cutting out patterns
Single edge razor or #11 Xacto knife
Glue - White Elmers glue will do, or Titebond Carpenters glue, or Duco glue(I usually thin 50/50 with acetone)
Tooth picks for glue application
Wax paper or Plastic wrap to cover plans so parts don't stick to the plans.
Pliers to bend any wire needed for landing gear
Spray bottle to spritz water or Isopropyl Alcohol onto the tissue (a hairspray pump bottle works well, check the Dollar Store if your wife/Mom/significant other, doesn't already have one you can use).
Straight pins to pin parts to the building board
A straight edge ruler (metal preferred)
Some sand paper medium grade and/or emery boards for sanding parts
Glue stick for attaching tissue or use diluted white glue (50/50 water to glue)

Stay tuned for some practical tutorials and some videos that are in the works.
Sky9pilot
« Last Edit: Mar 2nd, 2016 at 5:54pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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