Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Stick and Tissue Logo
 
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegister  
 
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
Building a Wright Flyer Engine (Read 4902 times)
Reply #25 - Mar 3rd, 2017 at 12:36pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
The propeller shaft housing and its supports were fabricated from Evergreen plastic tubing.  The ends were soaked in boiling water and pinched with a pair of needle nosed pliers to flatten out the ends.  A file was used to round out the ends.  A slot was cut using an X-Acto blade # 11 into the tubing to make room for a small flat plastic tab used to hold everything together. After the plastic tubing were glued together, they were painted overall gray.  After the paint dried, a pin vise & small drill bit was used to make some holes for regular pins to be glued in place to simulate the rivet heads.  I purposely left the pin heads unpainted to help it "pop out."  Then as a sort of "coup de grace" small rings were glued to the ends of the shaft.  I made one "left" and one "right" side propeller shafts with the pin heads sticking on the outside for show.  As with the engine, the same necklace chains were used for the drive system.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #24 - Mar 12th, 2017 at 11:43pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 8596
*****
 
Off-Topic replies have been moved to this Topic.
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #23 - Mar 3rd, 2017 at 12:25pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
The sub-assembly was then painted gray.  If you look closely at the second picture, you can easily see that the main support tube is in front with its curved reinforcement on the bottom.  The curved reinforcement is NOT attached to the back tubing containing the drive chains.  The curved tubing is still attached to the main support tubing which, in this photo, is in front.   It's this illusion that has created so much confusion.  Notice too that the short piece of red tape is now the flat metal strip used as reinforcement.  Next, the whole assembly was carefully installed to the axle housing of the engine and the propeller shaft housing to the airframe.  Logged lots of hours (days?) just staring at various pictures, drawings, blueprints and photos, weeding out the misleading and confusing ones until I finally got that "Eureka Moment!"
« Last Edit: Mar 3rd, 2017 at 7:33pm by Skyediamonds »  
IP Logged
 
Reply #22 - Mar 3rd, 2017 at 11:42am

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
Now that we've established the foundation for the drive system which consist of just one main support tube (for each side) -Sorry if I keep repeating this part, its really the heart of the whole system.  Let's build up the drive chain.  If you review my previous posting of my drawing, you'll also notice I included two short extra pieces of tubing.  These two short pieces will be used to hold the rest of the drive chain tubular system.  Sounds fragile?  Well, yeah it is.  I used epoxy instead of glue for added strength at this stage.  Now, I cut a pair of extra long tubes that will contain the chains within.  Looking at the last two pictures, you can easily see how they're being "framed up" with small extra pieces of tubing.  It's also at this stage, that I will admit I trial-fitted, cut, trial fitted, sanded a bit, trial fitted again until everything came within tolerance.  On the last photo, the drive chain system is sort of "upside down" laid flat with the main support tube on top being supported by the two small pieces.  Notice too, the short red tape?  This will be the flat metal reinforcement strip used on the Wright's drive system.  This will show up in my next posting. 
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #21 - Mar 3rd, 2017 at 11:10am

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
Tom and Bill, I sincerely thank you both.  As fellow modelers and moderators, your compliments carry much weight.  I've seen your works, previous postings and observations of our fellow members and you know what to look for and what is involved.  To be honest, I must've stared at the drawings, blueprints, and various photos and publications for hours until my eyes started to cross.  The Smithsonian has also a scale model of their full sized plane, but believe it or not, its not as accurate as this one I fabricated from Guillow's kit. -Gary
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #20 - Mar 3rd, 2017 at 11:04am

bigrip74   Offline
Global Moderator
What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 5073
****
 
Sky9pilot wrote on Mar 3rd, 2017 at 12:06am:
WoW...I've never seen a Wright flyer model so detailed.  Looks fabulous! 
Tom

"DITTO" What Tom stated, the only Flyer this detailed is in the Smithsonian.
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
IP Logged
 
Reply #19 - Mar 3rd, 2017 at 12:06am

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 8596
*****
 
WoW...I've never seen a Wright flyer model so detailed.  Looks fabulous! 
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #18 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 11:29pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
Let's break down the drive system.  It's really very simple.  I'm going to focus on the left side as that seems to be the most "complex."  The main focus is just one support tube.  It's from just this one main support tube that everything else is fabricated around.  I admit my drawings aren't the best, but they'll show the basic steps into building up the drive system.  Now, from my drawing, can you spot the differences between the "professional artist's rendering" and the actual photo from my previous posting?  Also, look at where the chain is supposedly wrapped around the engine axle gears.  The artist's rendering shows the axle gear to be far wider in diameter than what the actual engine is shown on the photo.  This is, but just one of a few examples of the misinformation and confusion surrounding the Wright Flyer.  Here, in the last picture, I jumped ahead just a bit and super-imposed the main tube over the Guillow's kit wooden version of the drive system while holding and extra member of one of the cross-tubes for the drive chain for photo illustration.  I should point out that this singular support tube (one for each side) is attached to the axle housing of the engine and the other end is attached to the tubular housing of the propeller shaft.  This is the only means of attachment for these two support tubes to the airframe.
« Last Edit: Mar 3rd, 2017 at 7:29pm by Skyediamonds »  
IP Logged
 
Reply #17 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 11:04pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
Now I thought perhaps you would enjoy seeing an artist' rendering of the drive chain from a "knowledgeable source" along with a photo of the actual drive chain system of the Wright Flyer.  Can you spot the differences? 
« Last Edit: Mar 3rd, 2017 at 7:26pm by Skyediamonds »  
IP Logged
 
Reply #16 - Mar 2nd, 2017 at 10:59pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
Good day everyone.  Aside from the engine, one of the major contentious issues I think that faces most modelers when building the Wright Flyer, is the challenge of fabricating the seemingly complex drive chains and their tubular structures.  I thought I would also share with you that this area is fraught with misinformation and confusion even from supposedly "informed sources."  As on the completed Wright engine, let's start out with a few pictures of the completed project and we'll go from there.
« Last Edit: Mar 3rd, 2017 at 7:25pm by Skyediamonds »  
IP Logged
 
Reply #15 - Jan 16th, 2017 at 7:42pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
To the finish!  The first picture shows the original Wright Bros' engine with it's carburetor on top.  Most people don't realize that the mechanic improvised the carburetor by using an old tomato can!  We can see the fuel line also snaking on top of the engine and up into the carburetor.  For the "tomato can" I used a soda straw from a local fast food eatery.  I knew they would come in handy someday. The straw was then placed over a wooden dowel for support.  While on the wooden support, I used a small pin vise to drill a hole for the fuel line to enter.  After that, I glued a small ring (purchased at a local arts and crafts store) to the end of the straw to form a "lip."  This "carburetor" was then painted silver and glued to the top of the engine block.  Finally, the fuel line was cut from the same copper wire used for the oil line.  I left the copper wire unpainted for that "bling" look of contrast from the silver engine and glued the wire along the engine block leading up to and inside the straw.   We finally come to the original picture of the model engine, and come full circle.  Hope you enjoyed the show.  Skye
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #14 - Jan 16th, 2017 at 7:21pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
Today, we'll come full circle and finish the engine.  Just a couple of more steps to add a bit of "finesse" for a little more eye-popping detailing.  As we all know, when it comes to the Wright Flyer, people will definitely focus on the engine.  In the first view,  compared to the picture of the real engine, we noticed the absence of the oil line.  The next picture shows just a small piece of copper wire about the appropriate sized diameter and length with a some small slices of transparent tape to simulate the connecting joints wrapped around the wire, and the whole assembly is then wrapped around the engine block.  This next step requires us to purchase a small set of gears available through most hobby outlets; and of course, the all-important chains.  The chains are available through arts & crafts stores and even Wal Mart has them in the jewelry department.  They come in a variety of sizes and colors.  Here, I just happen to be holding the brass-colored ones, but they also come in metallic silver, black, gold, etc.  I used the silver colored ones on the engine.  The gears were simply glued to a large piece of copper wire and the glued to the engine block along with a small fabricated "slack adjuster" attached between the two.  Then the chains were cut to the approx. length and simply wrapped around the gears starting at the *Bottom.*  I emphasized the word,  *bottom" because its the least visible area where the ends of the chain meets and nobody will notice any discrepancies.  Roll Eyes  As you can see here, it's really turning out to be a jewel in itself!  We're almost finished.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #13 - Jan 16th, 2017 at 2:10pm

Skyediamonds   Online
Senior Member
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 1297
****
 
On the real Wright Bros' engine, it was supposed to produce 20 horsepower.  It was designed and built by a mechanic named Taylor specifically for the Wright Flyer when other engine manufacturers either didn't have the engine/weight/power ratio, or they simply refused on the grounds if the plane should crash, it might reflect badly on their reputation.  They had only .44 gal. capacity fuel tank.  The Wright Bros' figured that would be enough for a test flight.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #12 - Jan 16th, 2017 at 10:25am

bigrip74   Offline
Global Moderator
What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 5073
****
 
Skyediamonds, great job on a beautiful engine Smiley. How many horse power? Wink


Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
IP Logged
 
Reply #11 - Jan 15th, 2017 at 10:57pm

heywooood   Offline
Full Member
it's a Mystery
san diego

Posts: 230
***
 
Terrific job on that engine!
 

"you made that from a box full of sticks?...What is WRONG with you!!"...Mrs. Heywooood
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print