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Cutting to Inside Curves (Read 292 times)
Reply #18 - Nov 11th, 2017 at 8:37am

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 227
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Hi Bob - I don't cut up my plans either. I have been collecting plans for about 25 years and there are a lot of them, more than I will be able to build in this lifetime and maybe the next. I just copied the parts that would suit my new found skill and thank you again for that. Thanks to Richard (Last Woodsman) I now have a vendor that would copy and make PDFs of my plans and am on the quest to get them all done. This allows me not only to keep my plan collection on my remote hard drive but now I can enlarge to any scale I want and build Peanuts to Jumbo, wish I had found this a long time back.
Mike
 
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Reply #17 - Nov 10th, 2017 at 9:39am

bigrip74   Offline
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

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Mike I print my plans on my printer then tape them together. I also so use the printer to either print more pages or just to copy those parts so I do not cut up the plans.

Glad to hear that Richard and I were of help Wink

Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #16 - Nov 10th, 2017 at 8:18am

New Builder   Offline
Full Member
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 227
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Quote:
I tried your method of cutting through the paper pattern and find it works great

Bigrip - Your tip works so well I've used it for cutting under cambered wing ribs, curved formers, wheel pants, almost anywhere I could think of. This has made my work so much easier. I would post some pictures of the build but I went into a lot of my plans and picked parts that seemed difficult. This plane would like Johnny Cash's Cadillac song, some parts from everywhere, maybe interesting but not something I would show any time soon.

Richard - I use your method for cutting around the outside of formers, cutting close then sanding while the paper is glued on. Also found that if I do the parts one at a time, the paper comes off nearly clean with a little sanding to get any remaining glued paper off. I also notch the first former at the nose while the paper is still on and leave the rest for later in the build.

Must say again, thanks to all who came to my rescue on this topic. Just like we say to all new members, ask and you shall receive, and boy do we.
Mike
 
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Reply #15 - Nov 8th, 2017 at 6:14pm

LASTWOODSMAN   Offline
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REAL PLANES HAD ROUND
ENGINES AND TWO WINGS
Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 863
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Hi Mike.  Here's my two cents.  I cut the inside curves of a   1/16"  balsa part on my not too "self-healilng" anymore, "Cutting Mat".   I sort of block up the part solid, with other bigger   1/16"   scrap balsa pieces around the sides of the part, to support the steel ruler  (I cut them to shape to fit roughly, a little bit, to hold the part), then I  get out the   12"   steel ruler, and I cut along in tiny little   1-2mm   increments, by just pressing straight down on the angled tip of the #11 Exacto blade, point first, and after cutting each little increment, I always slightly move the steel ruler each time - which can be done quickly with practise, and then I line up the next little increment with the steel ruler, and press down on the knife for the next increment cut, over and over.  You can get pretty fast at this.   When done, the part is not cut all of the way through, so I then lightly trace the cut slot through carefully, a few times with the exacto knife, by using the steel ruler.  It results in a very fine, ever so slightly, evenly jagged edge, leaving very little left to sand, by using sandpaper around a  1"   diameter dowel.  And I always, as 'terryman' said, cut away from the grain, and not in towards the grain, cut away from the grain towards the "safe" side away from the part.  You get the hang of that pretty quick also when you cut out a set of ribs from a "Printwood" kit parts sheet of balsa wood.
     One hundred #11 Exacto blades costs $25 =   25 cents per blade - CHEAP!  I go through at least 3 blades per model.
LWM
Richard
 

OH, I HAVE SLIPPED THE SURLY BONDS OF EARTH ... UP, UP THE LONG DELIRIOUS BURNING BLUE ... SUNWARD I'VE CLIMBED AND JOINED THE TUMBLING MIRTH OF SUN-SPLIT CLOUDS ...
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Reply #14 - Nov 8th, 2017 at 10:19am

staubkorb   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Germany

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I use Scotch brand "Removable Stick" (3M product).  Another releasable glue is POST-IT glue - the same as on the stickers by the same name, but in a bottle or tube.

One thing to be award of, is that cutting thru paper does a great job of dulling blades, so keep a hone handy.  If you don't have a hone, the bottom ring of your stone/porcelain coffee cup makes a fine substitute.
 

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Reply #13 - Nov 7th, 2017 at 5:25pm

bigrip74   Offline
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

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OK! Mike you now have to post some photos of that build please. Grin

Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #12 - Nov 7th, 2017 at 2:51pm

New Builder   Offline
Full Member
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 227
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Bigrip - I tried your method of cutting through the paper pattern and find it works great, the paper does a good job of keeping the wood together. I left the pattern on a bit too long and used a touch of alcohol to soften the glue stick. Thanks to all again for the tips.
Mike
 
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Reply #11 - Nov 7th, 2017 at 2:43pm

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 227
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Quote:
Maybe someone will chime in with the correct "grit"

Terry - I have been using an "EZE-LAP diamond hone I got from Lee Valley. The grit is labeled "Super Fine" and is 1200 grit (pn - 70M02.30). I use it to touch up my #11 xacto and scalpel blades and works fine, however it does, over time, change the blade from hollow ground to flat ground. I change the blade when it seems I'm honing instead of cutting. I also retrieved my cutting mat and have it at hand however I'm finding the self-healing quality a bit dubious.
Mike
 
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Reply #10 - Nov 7th, 2017 at 6:42am

New Builder   Offline
Full Member
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 227
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Thanks to all for jumping in on this topic. Seems I'm not the only one to face this problem. The theme thru all this is patience and something I'm getting better with but still a work in progress. I'm going to give a go at all the tips here and am very happy for all the help proving once again that we have the best community of model builders any where. Thank you to all and on the path to better work.
 
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Reply #9 - Nov 6th, 2017 at 9:35pm

bigrip74   Offline
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 4909
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Terry, it is nice to hear from you and your tips are what Ive been following my self.

Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #8 - Nov 6th, 2017 at 9:14pm

terryman   Offline
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I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Los Gatos, CA

Posts: 852
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In addition to all the advice already given, the following applies to cutting any wood with a knife:

Keep the blade sharp! I use Exacto #11.  I use a steel frequently to straighten the edge and oiled Arkansas stone when it needs it.  Replace with a knew blade just before you think it's not worth sharpening again  SmileyQuestioning. Others on the forum have mention diamond hones for sharpening which I'm anxious to try some time. Maybe someone will chime in with the correct "grit".

Use a cutting matt to help prevent dulling the blades tip.

I've never heard others on this one but try to cut in a direction so when the blade does follow the grain it is away from the piece being cut. 

Terry
 
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Reply #7 - Nov 6th, 2017 at 4:04pm

bigrip74   Offline
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 4909
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Mike, there is not any numbered way to cut out parts. The point was to let the blade cut not your hand, patience is the key.
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #6 - Nov 6th, 2017 at 3:51pm

MKelly   Offline
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Helotes, TX

Posts: 216
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I cut formers pretty much like Bob has shown, except that I prefer to cut out the inside before cutting the former from the sheet.  I break fewer formers that way...

Mike
 
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Reply #5 - Nov 6th, 2017 at 3:27pm

bigrip74   Offline
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 4909
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Mike, here are the photos of how I cut balsa formers. Hope this helps.
THESE ARE JUST TEST WOOD AND FORMER


1. the test former pattern cut from sheet.
...

2. the former pattern and some "B" grain medium to hard wood. Grain facing north to south.
...

3. former pattern face down and the glue stick (any glue stick will do the trick)
...

4. glue applied to back side of former (you will need to test how much glue to apply on scrap wood to see how much it will take to keep the pattern on the wood and not actually glue it to the wood).
...

5. pattern pressed onto the wood facing north to south with the grain.
...

6. in the shot I cut the former from the wood sheet.
...

7. as if you are drawing the inside of the former like Pete stated, just follow the line of the inside of the former (NOT HARD LET THE BLADE CUT PAPER ONLY). Now follow the line for several passes with each pass let the blade cut a little more with gradual pressure. It is easiest with the grain and cross grain is tough, but let the blade do the cutting.
...

8. After several passes (there is no set number) the center of the former should fall out of the wood.
...

 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #4 - Nov 6th, 2017 at 1:01pm

bigrip74   Offline
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 4909
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Mike, I looked for a photo of how I cut out formers, cut did not find any. So Ill take some then post for you.

Pete is correct about cutting tools and how to just lightly cut with the knife for several times to cut down through the wood. I put in a new #11 blade each time (costly but better than bad cut repairs)

1. I print the plans parts out,
2. cut them fairly close to the line
3. then glue stick them to the wood.
4. Wait for about 5 minutes or until dry.
5. New sharp blade, I follow the outline very lightly as if I were drawing. Then a little deeper with each pass.

What grain wood are you using? And in which direction is the grain when cutting?

Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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