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Wright Bros' Flyer (Read 921 times)
Reply #44 - Feb 11th, 2018 at 11:08am

heywooood   Offline
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it's a Mystery
san diego

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this is an example of precision in modeling. Research, artistry, execution. Beautiful homage to the Wright Brothers and their machine
 

"you made that from a box full of sticks?...What is WRONG with you!!"...Mrs. Heywooood
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Reply #43 - Feb 11th, 2018 at 8:31am

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

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Gary - I can only imagine the hours you spent reading, thinking and planning this build. The build, as well as the rigging, shows your usual great care in the process and I saw the same in your SE5. Certainly gives me pause to do some deeper research into my builds. As we've seen in the rubber power section, there is some great research in the planes being built there. More to come, hopefully.
New Builder
Mike
 
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Reply #42 - Feb 11th, 2018 at 1:19am

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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I liked the paragraph on their treatment of props as well...not just fans but wings in themselves providing lifting power.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #41 - Feb 11th, 2018 at 1:12am

John Webster   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Painesville, Ohio

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One of the ways in which the Wrights were far ahead of the other aerial experimenters of the time was in the structural design of their aircraft. The flyers were designed to withstand a 5G load. The Wrights were alone in realizing that the airplane had the ability to impose on itself loads that could destroy it.

Their friend Chanute was an accomplished bridge designer and probably recommended books on the subject to them but a look at his designs makes it clear that he was unaware of the forces that could be generated.
 

When you begin to fly you are issued two bags, one full of luck and an empty one for experience.&&The object is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck.
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Reply #40 - Feb 10th, 2018 at 11:05pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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Found this article on the  Wright Bros and their flyers, thought y'all might be interested in it: Click Here
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #39 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 6:32pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

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Wright Flyer:
 
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Reply #38 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 6:31pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer:  Rudder was assembled and rigged separately, then it was installed with the rigging from the bell cranks.  Next came the propellers and they were then painted with a lighter shade of gray to simulate the tipped fabric. 
 
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Reply #37 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 6:20pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer:  The forward elevators were then installed and dressed up with roller underneath for the rails. 
 
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Reply #36 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 6:18pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer:  Up until now, we've left off a couple of items so that we would be free to rig the main airframe without knocking something off, or restricting access.  At this point, the front elevators were assembled and covered.  The controls were separately rigged ahead of time so as to minimize any chance of bumping into the main frame.  Picture # 138 shows I used thin strips of paper painted silver to simulate the brackets used to hold the elevator frame together. As they say: "Devil's in the details."
 
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Reply #35 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 6:01pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer:  The crossed over wires were then rigged.  The model is really taking shape.  Until now, I never knew sewing could be fun.
 
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Reply #34 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 5:51pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer: After the wing warping comes the longitudinal rigging between the front and rear struts.  Now's the time to rig this part before it's all "closed in" with the crossed rigging that we all see in all those pictures.  I used a needle that was bent to allow me to thread through the struts and the curved portion of the needle helped me to avoid accidentally sticking through the covering.  It should be noted that the outer most struts were not rigged longitudinally to allow flexibility in the twisting of the wings.
 
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Reply #33 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 5:42pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer:  Wow.  Does the real Flyer have all those cables twisted and threaded through those pulleys and bell cranks?  The underside of the top wing have those parallel cables?  Judging from the photos of the full sized Flyer, it would appear that it does. How does the model compare so far?  I must've stared transfixed at these photos and more, for a long time.   
« Last Edit: Jan 7th, 2018 at 7:35pm by Skyediamonds »  
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Reply #32 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 5:19pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer: Next, comes the lower wing warping rigging.  Maybe it's just me, but this is actually the fun part.  We can see that the rigging is starting to look good and everything is coming together.  Lots of planning prior to covering went into this build to ensure that there would be a wooden block or some means of support being in place for the pulleys and bell cranks as well as the wing struts.  The photo # 23 shows the model upside down, only because I was attaching the lower rigging to the underside of the top wing.  So this reveals the model being flipped upside down and back as the rigging progresses.  The next photos show the hook ups of the bell cranks and the pilot's cradle.  A good close up reveals the small tubing allowing the cables to run near the foot rest and the crossed over at the pilot's cradle.  For those who wonder:  yes, the right lower wing's cable actually ran underneath the engine, crossed over and connected to the pilot's cradle.
 
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Reply #31 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 5:12pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Wright Flyer:  Alrighty.  Whew, I must've revised that last posting about a dozen times to get the wording right.  If anyone has any questions or comments, please let me know.  The first picture shows just about all of the accessories have been installed, save for the three rear struts, fuel tank and the propellers.  As with most rigging (or modeling for that matter) I decided to work from the inside to the outside.  It was also decided to start with the simplest of rigging and move to the more detailed.  Thus, the underside of the top wing warping was rigged first.  The first set of pictures show the rigging of the underside.  Notice the parallel cables running back and forth, one for the left and right wings.
 
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Reply #30 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 4:11pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

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Wright Flyer: What I'm about to write may be a bit long, but it will bring into sharp focus everything pertaining to the rigging of both the model and the full sized Flyer.  As in my previous postings, I left out three of the rear wing struts to allow access to the inner workings of the rigging and the installation of various accessories.  Rather than simply attaching a bunch of threads to various struts and parts of the model, to properly set up the rigging on the Flyer as it truly is meant to be, I discovered that it was important to understand how it functions.  The first order of rigging starts with the wing-warping mechanism.  The first picture shows my own drawing of the whole wing-warping mechanism that I referenced when setting up the rigging.  Many people did not know that the wing-warping involved rigging both top and bottom wings.  The second picture shows the breakdown of this set up, starting with the lower wing.  This helped me to get a good visual of the warping arrangement.  The second drawing is pretty self-explanatory except for the reason of connecting the cables to the rudder.  The Wright Bros' research revealed that in order to initiate a coordinated turn (bank), they needed a vertical rudder to help offset "adverse yaw."  This term is just a wee bit outside the scope of my posting, however suffice to say "adverse yaw" only comes into play whenever the plane's controls are moved from their neutralized position.  Say, if the plane is already in an established turn and the controls are back to neutral, the adverse yaw disappears.  If rudder was still to be  employed after the turn has been established, then the plane starts to slip.  Thus, even the rudder returns to its neutral position after the turn has been established.  Does this make sense?

It's the use of the rudder that sets the Wright Bros' apart from the rest of the pioneers of flight.  Their research led them to hook up the rudder through cables and bellcranks to the wing-warping system such that the rudder "automatically" deflected in the proper direction to the bank of the turn; then returned either to neutral when the wing-warping was neutralized or to the opposite direction should the pilot initiate the cradle and cable system in that particular direction.  It was this arrangement that set the Wright Bros' apart from the rest of the pioneers, including Samuel Langley, the professor whose own flying machine crashed into the Potomac River after being launched off of a floating barge.  We are able to see this system on Beechcraft Bonanzas and Barons almost 75 years later.  A true testimonial to the Wright Bros' geniuses.

The third drawing illustrates the rigging underneath the top wing.  This rigging is reactive to, or supportive of, the lower wing's rigging.  Anytime the rigging of the lower wing is pulled (or moved), the top wing's rigging will help react to it by warping the top wing in the same direction.  What is left out in the third drawing is that the wing struts will come into play here, and help pull down the top wing when the cable tension is released by the movement of the pilot's cradle.  What the third drawing should have said: "Lengthening of (underside of top wing) cable results in (lack) of tension from lower cables and the (wing struts take over) pulling downward.
« Last Edit: Jan 8th, 2018 at 12:34pm by Skyediamonds »  
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