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WACO YMF-5 30" Jim Young/ Manzano. (Read 3533 times)
Reply #38 - Jan 14th, 2018 at 7:37pm

Craig 3   Online
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I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
West Virginia, USA

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Now for the woodwork part- I did some improvisation here- the plan said "cover with 1/32" balsa" and left me to my own devices. It's what my mentor Bill calls a "builder's kit," and a prototype short kit at that. Oh- and at this point you should have either your modified wing ribs with the eyelets, or a set of gauge blocks with holes in the location of your future wing rib eyelets, prepared. A chunk of quarter-inch balsa with two sharpie-marks into which you can shove the hooks will work fine. You just need them to be precisely spaced.

Step one is to flatten any lumpiness on the solder joints with a fine file or sanding stick. It shouldn't take much, and do it under good light. When you see the first glimmer of copper, stop. You're done with that side.

Now, go to the stash and select the softest 1/32" sheet you have and strip off enough for the covers. Make it a scosche  oversize for finishing. In the case of this one, they needed to finish out at 1/4" wide, so I stripped it to 5/16".

Cut two identical boards to a length that will just fit between the hooks on one leg. Lay one piece on the board, carefully center the leg on it, and burnish the leg into the wood. I used the lid of an upside-down Testors jar for an implement. You may want to do a test piece- the object is to make an impression into the balsa, not shear it in two (again, don't ask...)

OK, now make another one just like that, only impressing the other side of the leg. Since you did the easy side first, you'll notice that you'll have to do some propping here- you can do it over a suitably thick scrap of balsa cut to fit between the hooks, or just shove the hooks into the block. Be sure to put the cover under it first if you use the second system.

Now, burnish again. Make a cup of coffee. Using PVA, paint the two strips thoroughly, on the mating sides. Wait a couple of minutes, and you'll see the strips start to curl a bit, away from the side you just glued. This indicates that the moisture of the glue has further softened the balsa.

Be careful to index the solder-joint ends of the strips over the solder joints, and laminate the wire between the two strips. Make sure the strips are carefully aligned with one another and the wire core is centered. Now, massage the two two strips together, and, whilst drinking coffee, watch a you-tube video of an MKelly trimming flight or two- all the while working back and forth until the glue grabs well. Squeeze hard, especially at the solder joint.

Do the two legs first, the cut and fit the diagonal. and glue it into place. Now pop the whole shebang into your ribs, or gauge blocks, whichever you're using. I know we frown on glue fillets here, but in this case you have my permission- at the diagonal joints. Let them cure long enough to lock the spacing precisely into shape, and voila!- you have a set of interplane struts that will pop right into place and properly locate your upper wing. And, they will, with MINIMAL work, look like scale oval aerodynamic tubing- the one in this picture has had NO sanding to shape. You can trim the ends, add any scale-detail faux clevises or turnbuckles you like, and when you mount them, just secure the hooks into the eyelets with a drop of glue.

On a FF build, this could be adapted to very fine wire or even thread to replace the music wire, or maybe even a bent stationery staple at each end.
 

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Reply #37 - Jan 14th, 2018 at 7:00pm

Craig 3   Online
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I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
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Posts: 710
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I don't know about the rest of you, but as for myself, I approach building struts and mounting upper wings on bipes with a certain amount of trepidation. This one has an interesting system- the construction as presented would naturally be a little heavy for a Rubber FF build, but most of it could be adapted. It would be the berries, and a real time-and-frustration saver, for a static build.

The appropriate wing ribs in the short kit were made of 1/16" ply and include  eyelets into which hooks at the strut ends are locked. The "working" parts of the struts are formed of 1/32" music wire, CAREFULLY bent to shape over the plans, joined into a unit by finely wrapped copper wire, then soldered together.

I'll stress that, at each step in the process, the assembly must be checked against the plan and corrected before progressing.

The music wire may look clean- it isn't. Sand it thoroughly in the area to be joined. You'll need a decent iron that will bring the music wire up to temp for a good "hot" joint- while the fine copper wire will provide some strength, it is more there for alignment and the join of the music wire is the solid part. Use fine acid-core solder or paste flux as you prefer.

Once you have the music wire sanded, wipe it down with alcohol. Pull the copper wire through your alky moistened towel a few times. Wipe the fried chicken leavin's off your fingers while you're at it. Both hands Smiley Now, commence to fly-tying.

If you used, say, 120 grit to sand the music wire and wrap the copper (i used frog-hair-gauge wire stripped from an obsolete printer cord I liberated from  "that" drawer), you'll be surprised how snugly it tightens down. When you have one joint wrapped, check it one last time agains the plan and solder it. That way, you won't have to worry about moving it while you do the other leg.

I'll throw this in now- as you do this, be sure to make a mirror image assembly for the second set. Don't ask ...

You're going for a really clean, minimally loaded, solder joint. The reason will be apparent in the next set of pics.
 

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Reply #36 - Jan 11th, 2018 at 1:06pm

Huey v77   Offline
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I hate P51's, live east
of Cleveland Ohio.
Orwell, Ohio

Posts: 182
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Craig, it's warm enough to venture out to the garage(55).The prop I'm using on the Stearman is from APC #LP08038SF 8x3.8 SF Slow-Flyer, it acts like a climb prop, if you know what means. Like shifting into a low gear, not for speed. It's 8" in dia. with a 3.8" pitch. Good for a brushless motor, and a plane with lots of drag.

Mark
 
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Reply #35 - Jan 10th, 2018 at 7:45am

MKelly   Offline
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Helotes, TX

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I like it!
 
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Reply #34 - Jan 9th, 2018 at 8:26pm

Craig 3   Online
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Here's a wingtip for Mike Smiley
 

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Reply #33 - Jan 7th, 2018 at 12:50pm

Craig 3   Online
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West Virginia, USA

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Well, it's taken the better part of the weekend, but I got half the lower wing framed up. It's a pretty delicate piece of work and needs to be precise and true because the aileron torque tubes travel in 1/8" holes in the TE portion of the inner ribs, right behind the rear spar.  I had to unpin it to do the other side, as it has a one-piece main spar and each panel builds flat on the board- the outer ribs have building tabs. It seemed like a good time to see if it fit the fuselage. It does.
 

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Reply #32 - Jan 6th, 2018 at 7:19pm

MKelly   Offline
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Helotes, TX

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Very nice woodwork Craig!  This is going to be a beautiful model.
 
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Reply #31 - Jan 6th, 2018 at 12:18pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Great looking fuselage.  Way to see the contours in the coffee creamer jar for the fuselage.  Very creative.  This is going to be one great looking model!!!
Tom Smiley
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #30 - Jan 6th, 2018 at 9:04am

Craig 3   Online
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I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
West Virginia, USA

Posts: 710
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Getting the fuselage pretty well whipped into shape. Sheeted with 4lb 1/16" stock- 10 pieces total molded wet over my coffee whitener container and spliced together after kiln/drying over the furnace register.  This thing is one beautiful compound curve- nary a straight line in it. I'll cut the cockpit hole last.

Now to start on the wings while I wait for the electrical bits to show up. Then I get to figure that stuff out:)
 

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Reply #29 - Jan 2nd, 2018 at 3:01pm

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

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Another option is Blue Stuff and is available thru Amazon. It is a moldable product that will harden and then you can cast all your blisters one after another and they will all be identical and since nothing sticks to it and after done, recover the product for another time.
Mike
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #28 - Jan 2nd, 2018 at 11:37am

Sky9pilot   Offline
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When faced with that many duplicate blisters/fairing I will usually carve a mold and then plunge mold as many as I need from plastic picnic plates I get at the Dollar Store.  I've found the plates in red, black & white.  I then trim them with a razor blade to the proper size and I usually make some extra in case I make a trimming error.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #27 - Jan 2nd, 2018 at 7:00am

Craig 3   Online
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I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
West Virginia, USA

Posts: 710
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It's 2 degrees F here. I'm not a big fan of cold. There's finally something soft on the ground and the rubber is frozen stiff.

Jim Young suggested using an appropriate sized stick of preshaped TE and rounding the tip to a blister shape, slicing it off, and repeating. I might try that. I hand carved each one for my Monocoupe and it got kind of tedious.
« Last Edit: Jan 2nd, 2018 at 11:30am by Craig 3 »  

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Reply #26 - Jan 1st, 2018 at 9:31pm

Huey v77   Offline
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of Cleveland Ohio.
Orwell, Ohio

Posts: 182
***
 
Happy New Year Craig, don't know about you but it's too D$&n cold up here! With the problem of the rocker cover blisters, I communicated with Park Flyer Plastics. They have verious size cowls. I'm going to use one for my 40" Gee Bee and it needs blisters. He suggested using their wing tip lens. Manicured to fit the cowl. I'm going to try it when I get that far.
 
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Reply #25 - Jan 1st, 2018 at 4:26pm

Craig 3   Online
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I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
West Virginia, USA

Posts: 710
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Happy New Year to you, too, Richard!

Welp, I got the stringers on and got it off the crutch. That's in interesting way to build one- it stayed pretty square!

I'm stuck until some parts come in- I can't sheet the front end until I get some aluminum tubing buried in it for landing gear and cabane strut mounts, and pretty soon I'm going to have to start figuring how and where to mount the servos and radio gear. I'm on uncharted ground here, for me!

I think I'll start molding some 1/16" sheet for the fuselage top. I should probably clean the building table and the surrounding ten feet of balsa fragments, too, before diving back in!
« Last Edit: Jan 2nd, 2018 at 8:54am by Craig 3 »  

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Reply #24 - Jan 1st, 2018 at 10:07am

LASTWOODSMAN   Offline
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Windsor, Ontario, Canada

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Happy New Year Craig !   
Very interesting
build you have going there! Smiley Thanks for all the pics and explanations - the crutch, the slide in tray, the hinges, your laminations - all new to me.  I made my own 1-2-3 blocks a long time ago, but I can't FIND them ...  Undecided
LWM
Richard
 

OH, I HAVE SLIPPED THE SURLY BONDS OF EARTH ... UP, UP THE LONG DELIRIOUS BURNING BLUE ... SUNWARD I'VE CLIMBED AND JOINED THE TUMBLING MIRTH OF SUN-SPLIT CLOUDS ...
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