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How to build model airplanes >> Current Rubber Powered Builds by S&T members >> Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
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Message started by Dan on Sep 7th, 2019 at 4:21am

Title: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 7th, 2019 at 4:21am
Though it may not be the ideal kit for someone who's never completed a model, I will soon be starting the build of a Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk. As an unskilled builder, I already have a question. The fuselage is constructed with bulkheads and longitudinal formers. Stick balsa is then placed between the nose and canopy, as well as between the canopy and the tail. What is the best way to attach the sticks?

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by pb_guy on Sep 7th, 2019 at 9:56am
There is a sort of quick video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPJN8esRvaA
It isn't really a build guide, but shows some progress along the way. The kit instructions should be fairly straight forward. We can explain the steps you might find confusing.
ian

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 7th, 2019 at 10:41am
You might find the Glossary of Terms helpful in describing your building procedures:Click Here.  With the Chipmunk your kit has sheet fuselage sides that the formers are attached to.  Then the stringers (sticks) are added to the formers after they are attached to the fuselage sides.  With this kind of construction I'd recommend starting with the formers that are in the middle of the fuselage and then pull the ends together as the remaining formers are attached.  Just a suggestion...

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 7th, 2019 at 11:38am
Sky9pilot: If I understand that procedure correctly, I would get a couple-few central formers in place and squared up, and put the taper in as I work toward front and rear? Makes more sense than the procedure described in the plans!

Thank you for the glossary. I have added it to my growing list of handy reference material.

Ian: I viewed the video. It was helpful, primarily for showing the shape of the fuselage. However, it didn't answer my question about the stringers. At 0:55 in, it looks like one of the wings is on a scale. Am I correct?

As regards the fuselage stringers, it seems an easy enough process. It is the order of steps that I'm unsure of. Should I cut, glue into place, and sand? Or should I glue into place, cut and sand?

I'm glad I haven't glued anything together yet!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 7th, 2019 at 12:11pm
Stringer placement varies with each modeler... I usually will stick the stringer in place to get an approximate length and then cut it to fit the area just measured with a bit left over (like around the cockpit area) then after the glue has dried trim it or sand it flush with the former at the opening.  I usually leave the sanding till the fuselage is complete and sand the whole fuselage at once starting with 220 grit and then finish sanding with 400 or 600 grit.  You want the surface really smooth before adding the tissue...as one of the new modelers said, "Applying the tissue was like trying to put the tissue on a cactus!" or something like that.  The smoother the better! Hope this makes sense.  Our fellow modelers may have other suggestions so feel free to jump in here fellas...there's never just one way...

Yes, the wing panel was on a scale.  Lots of modelers will weigh components because they have a target weight they hope to achieve with their build.  As Colin Chapman of Lotus fame said, "Simplify then add lightness!"
Sky9pilot

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 7th, 2019 at 8:00pm
I decided that this thread needed some pictures, so I got a little work done, even if it was just mocking up the rudder.

I figured this was a good thing to do, as I wasn't certain that R-2 was cut properly. Getting it laid out helped me see that it was indeed cut properly. Two repairs to R-2 will be necessary because I figured the parts would break away cleanly. From here on out, I'll use a blade to remove parts!

I also had to change order of assembly. My original plan was to build the fuselage first. That changed when I discovered that if I cut out the patterns for notching the formers, part of the plan for the right wing will be gone! I may make a copy of those patterns later, as I'd like to keep the plans intact. The fuselage will now be the last assembly I glue together.

I'll pick up a few additional supplies tomorrow and get to gluing!
Chipmunk_Rudder_Mock-Up.jpg (85 KB | 36 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 7th, 2019 at 8:24pm
I would recommend sanding the back of the sheet to remove die cut (lovingly called "die crunched") parts. If after sanding the back of the sheet the parts still won't fall out, a little assistance from a razor blade will help.

When you're ready to glue, make sure each joint fits tightly or you'll have a very weak joint that will likely break when covered with tissue. 

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by pb_guy on Sep 7th, 2019 at 9:21pm
I recommend that you never cut your plan at all. You might want to build another, or you might have to rebuild a part. Use your printer to make a copy and cut out pieces of the copy. Don't worry about the stringers until after the fuselage is built and the sides joined together at the back. Then you will get some info on how to do it right.

  An electronic postal scale good to +_0.01 g is an excellent investment. You can weigh your wood to determine density, and the finished parts when weighed will give an idea of potential performance.
ian

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 8th, 2019 at 4:18am
I am glad I gathered knowledge before I started gluing! Armed with that knowledge, I have decided to start construction of the horizontal stabilizer first; hopefully I will be able to remove its laser-cut parts cleanly. When I go to FedEx Office tomorrow, I will also make a copy of the patterns for the formers and "stiff paper" parts. I will also add a postal scale and--eventually--a printer and working computer to my tools and supplies collection.

It is great to have found a forum where a rookie gets a lot of help and no negativity. Many, many thanks to both Sky9pilot and Ian for their generous advice and help before I even began construction!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 8th, 2019 at 9:12am
Welcome to the forum, Dan! You won't find a better bunch of folks to enjoy this hobby with! There are sub-forums to cover any aspect of building a model, and if you can't find an answer to a specific question, just ask here!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by New Builder on Sep 8th, 2019 at 12:43pm

Quote:
It is great to have found a forum where a rookie gets a lot of help and no negativity

Dan - Quite right this is the place, lots of encouragement and friendship. Negativity only slows us down in this great hobby and life gets in the way often enough to take care of that, so on to your build.

There has been some discussion regarding stringers but no pics so decided to add a couple of them. Everybody has their own method of attaching stringers and eventually your method will come through. While waiting for that, I've included two photos of a stringer application on my Culver Dart on the turtle deck. I work much like Tom except that I use a knotted string and put it in the first stringer location and stretch it back to the end then put my knife along the string at the second location and make a small mark, then sand the notch and work your way to the end. The string is handy because it can be moved around until it is straight end to end or curved as you need. My sanding tool is only a piece of 1/16th basswood about an inch long and super glued a piece of 220 grit sand paper to the long edge. When the glue is cured I cut the sandpaper to the faces of the piece of wood and you have a notching tool. I sand the faces of the sanding tool as some of the sandpaper may be sticking out and make the notch a little too wide. Hopefully the pics will be helpful and the one from the front view shows the notches already in place.
Mike
Oops_001.jpg (146 KB | 25 )
Partial_Assembly_001.jpg (133 KB | 19 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Kerak on Sep 8th, 2019 at 1:02pm
Hey Dan!  You know what they say about advice....ha.  Here's mine...simple but effective...BE PATIENT!  Take your time...look it all over for a while...and...there isn't a modeling disaster that can't be rescued...usually!  We're all here to commiserate and encourage. ;) [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

Neal

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 8th, 2019 at 1:55pm
Thanks to Alfakilo, Mike, and Neal for their kind words and encouragement!

With all the supplies required for constructing the sub-assemblies procured, I got to work...and was quickly stopped. The attached photo shows parts S-2 pinned in place and part R-2 in the lower left corner, waiting for its glue to dry. A third piece of R-2 was left behind, but it was so small and fiddly that I probably won't bother with it.

I still have much to learn, so I'll ask questions before frustration sets in. Three questions have arisen:

1. Am I better off cutting the strips to required length before gluing?
2. I tried to pin a 1/16" square strip in place. It split. I took a scrap piece, pinned it, and got another split. Turning the scrap piece and pinning it resulted in another split. Is this normal, can it be mitigated, or does one need not pin such pieces in place?
3. I'm using regular ol' Elmer's glue. How much dry time should I allow?
Chipmunk_Sorta_Started.jpg (66 KB | 40 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Rekitus Maximus on Sep 8th, 2019 at 2:26pm
I expect other will give answers also.

I let stringers poke out a bit long where I can.
this is with the expectation that I can sand them down
to meet plan curves and openings.

victor

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 8th, 2019 at 2:40pm
Most will not try to stick a pin thru 1/16. Instead, they will use 2 pins crossed over the 1/16 strip. Or, use a pin clamp to hold the part down. Or some use magnets.

I shop for the thinnest possible pins to minimize splitting. Check the sewing section in Wal-Mart. I find that T-pins are a bit too big for small model wood.

I'll let a glue like Elmers "dry" for several hours. On those S-2 end pieces, consider notching them to give the 1/16 piece a better hold.

I do cut the 1/16 pieces to fit before gluing. Take care to make a clean squared up cut. Some folks double glue this step. Leading and trailing edge pieces can be glued and then sanded to shape.

Pics show pin clamps available from Pecks. I like these a lot. Use them with grip pins from Pecks.

https://www.wind-it-up.com/collections/tools/products/pp698

https://www.wind-it-up.com/collections/tools/products/mw587


PinClampsA_1024x1024_2x.jpg (10 KB | 31 )
grip_pins2_180x.jpg (4 KB | 35 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 8th, 2019 at 4:02pm
Alfakilo: thank you again for the help! I don't know why the double-pin didn't occur to me.

Victor: that was exactly the method I planned on using. Thanks for your help!

I now have the horizontal stabilizer all glued up! I did as alfakilo suggested and put a small notch in each S-2 piece. The photo shows the better of two notches. Apologies for the globs of glue that are all too conspicuous. And perhaps I went a little overboard with the pins; by my count, there are 44.

Another question must be asked. Sky9pilot mentioned that I want these parts to fit tightly. If they aren't as tight as they should be, what balsa filler is recommended?

I've had a productive day. Time to pack up the other kit parts, find a cat-proof place for my building board, and have some dinner!
Chipmunk_Part_S-2_Notched.jpg (61 KB | 32 )
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Drying.jpg (80 KB | 37 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Rekitus Maximus on Sep 8th, 2019 at 5:01pm
that thar is a beautiful stabilizer.
no sarcasim. well done.
except?  are you going to place the S-1 piece?

You can save some weight I'd suppose...
buuuut it is tough to cover an open space like that.

victor

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 8th, 2019 at 6:14pm

Rekitus Maximus wrote on Sep 8th, 2019 at 5:01pm:
are you going to place the S-1 piece?

If you hadn't pointed that out, I wouldn't have noticed it until I got to the next assembly! I also noticed that I forgot the S-3 pieces and the central ribs. These omissions have been corrected.

Thank you for the encouragement. I believe I can be successful in, and thoroughly enjoy, this hobby! We'll see how well I really did when it comes time to remove the now-finished assembly! (I tend to overdo adhesives.)
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Reworked.jpg (86 KB | 21 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Rekitus Maximus on Sep 8th, 2019 at 6:47pm
Hi Dan,

your tailfeather looks good.

as long as your glue is sandable don't worry it too much.

I have a P-51 stab that I sanded a bit too thin
(I plan to re-make it) so it is possible to over sand.
I was trying to add lightness.

one of the guys I met at an RC club was always trying to build lighter. 
he flew pattern-planes and they would pop apart and toss stabs and rudders. 
with the usual following crunch. I can't say he ever learned to use enough glue or balsa.

so enough to get the job done and no more may be a good target.

fair warning: I can build a plane that looks ok and glides straight.  my rubber powered flights leave something to be desired... so far.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 8th, 2019 at 7:27pm
My main worry about the glue is that I used too much and the stabilizer will stick to the wax paper. That happened with the R-2 piece I tried to repair. I will be cutting a patch for that piece from a scrap of the sheet it was punched out of.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Rekitus Maximus on Sep 8th, 2019 at 8:03pm
everyone finds ways to get things done to their satisfaction.

I like elmers glue. I do not use it on balsa airframes because
it tends to ball up when sanding.

I have a relative who does not let me share my acetone
glues and solvents with her child...

so I recommend the tight-bond type glues
(the yellow-ish wood glues)  I think the elmers brand has a version.

I like the feel of the 527 glue I can find in stores like walmart
it holds well and can be dissolved for those oh so common re-kitting events ...

And it may be easier to cut new wood and make the parts over.

I had not noticed that the water clean up glues stick to waxed paper... 
even if it does... you can sand it off, right?

Btw  I like the chipmunk, both guillows and real.

victor




Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by MKelly on Sep 8th, 2019 at 9:55pm
Good start on the Chipmunk Dan.  Stew Meyers has published articles in the Flying Aces Club newsletter discussing how to improve the Guillows 900-series kits including the Chipmunk - PM me an e-mail address and I'll send you a PDF of it.  The article has pictures, text and drawings showing how to make the model more robust and flightworthy without adding a lot of weight - if nothing else it'll be worth a read.

As far as glues go for frame construction I like Titebond II, applied sparingly and with any excess squeeze-out wiped away with a toothpick or bamboo skewer.  I glue up over wax paper and don't have any trouble with the frames sticking to it.  I use Duco cement to glue covered and doped assemblies together.  Lots of choices for adhesives out there, experiment and find the one(s) that work best for you.

I strongly recommend joining the Flying Aces Club (FAC)  - you'll get a bimonthly newsletter full of tips, plans, and contest reports that are sure to get the creative juices flowing.  You can take a look at back issues of the newsletter on the web at:  http://flyingacesclub.com/wp/about-the-fac/fac-news-back-issues/.  Start with the highest numbered back issues to get an idea of what the current newsletter format looks like.  On the FAC site you can also see what events and squadrons are in your area - go to one when you get the chance, you'll meet some great folks and see a wide variety of building and flying styles.  Folks share their tips and techniques freely, and using just a fraction of what I've learned from them has dramatically improved how my models fly.

Anyhow, enjoy your build and the excellent community here on Stick and Tissue - looking forward to watching your Chipmunk come together.

Cheers,

Mike

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 9th, 2019 at 4:40am
I believe the Elmer's glue is a little on the thin side. For my next project, I will seek out a glue that is a little more viscous, to better counteract the effects of gravity. Any wax paper that is stuck to the stabilizer will just be sanded away.

Mike, I will send you a PM with my e-mail address. I also discovered that the Flying Aces Club has a squadron that isn't too far from me.

Victor, I'm really liking the Chipmunk, too!

Edit: I have removed the stabilizer from the building board. One section gave me a little grief (I'd cut a leading-edge rib with the wax paper over the plans, allowing a little glue to seep through), but it's holding together okay. Still need to remove the stabilizer from the wax paper, but that has to wait till later...I have to head to work soon.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 9th, 2019 at 8:17am
Dan, I have better luck with plastic kitchen wrap instead of wax paper. I use CA glues and they tend to stick to wax paper more than plastic. In either case, a major issue is the glue seeping through pin holes in the wax paper or plastic wrap. Usually, a little careful prying will free the part.

Most of us probably have a number of glue types depending on what we are doing. Elmers is an aliphatic resin, often called 'white glue', and there are many types to be found in hardware and hobby stores (Elmers, SIG-Bond, Titebond, etc). One that I use a lot is Aleens found in Wal-Mart, a good tacky glue that dries clear and sands well.

There are still old fashioned glues from back in the day. Ambroid is gone but Sigment, Duco, or Testors are still readily available. These are all solvent in acetone allowing us to reset mistakes.

CA glues are very popular and come in a various thicknesses. The quick set up time allows us to build framework very fast, but a note of caution. CA doesn't sand easily and its easy to sand the wood away rather than the glue. Some folks object to the acid odor of most of these CA glues. There are CA debonders that undo mistakes, and there are CA accelerators that speed up the curing times for the thicker types of CA. If you haven't used thin CA, be very careful of keeping fingers away from the gluing area as the thin CA will wick through balsa and instantly glue your fingers to the wood.

Glue sticks are popular for sticking tissue on to the framing. UHU is excellent, and Elmers is good too.


Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by pb_guy on Sep 9th, 2019 at 11:26am
One glue you should have on hand for sure is the Aleene's Tacky glue. Not at all expensive, and it is the only glue that works (at least for me) for gluing the plastic canopy to the finished fuselage.
ian

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Kerak on Sep 9th, 2019 at 11:40am
Dan...and anyone else interested...a few days ago I ran across my copy of PEANUT POWER! by Bill Hannan.  Had it for years...but it seems to migrate on its own around the house.

I'm certain it's out of print now...but if one can procure a copy...it's a very enjoyable reference source not only for peanut scale construction, but stick n' tissue in general.  While there are many reference sources available, this one in particular has been very happy for me over the years...worth searching for your own copy...will answer innumerable questions.  ;)

Hey folks...recall those wonderful model magazines that used to be on the newsstand...terrific inspiration and teaching tools.  Of course...that's what we're all about now on the SnT site, especially for those of us who aren't fortunate enough to have a magazine stack six feet high.  [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

Neal
PEANUT_POWER_by_Bill_Hannan.jpg (81 KB | 18 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 9th, 2019 at 1:22pm
$40 on Amazon!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 9th, 2019 at 1:26pm

pb_guy wrote on Sep 9th, 2019 at 11:26am:
One glue you should have on hand for sure is the Aleene's Tacky glue. Not at all expensive, and it is the only glue that works (at least for me) for gluing the plastic canopy to the finished fuselage.
ian


I'm a big fan of Aleens. Especially like the Turbo version, quick drying and clear. I use it to glue card stock and non-load bearing balsa.

turbo-tacky-glue.jpeg (6 KB | 20 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 9th, 2019 at 6:16pm
Wow...all those replies while I was out of the house! I will give the Aleen's glue a try. CA glue, not so much. I have gotten my thumb and forefinger stuck together with CA glue, and immediately went for my girlfriend's nail-polish remover. I will also replace the wax paper with cling wrap.

Peanut Power looks like a great read. I will have to find a copy eventually.

I probably won't get any building done today, but I was able to make copies of the plans (for former and wing rib notching patterns and a template for cutting a new R-2 piece). I also picked up the final tool I needed for constructing the wood pieces: a small metal ruler.

Again, profuse thanks to all for the help and suggestions!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 10th, 2019 at 7:40pm
Despite being sore from a couple of strenuous days at work (I have probably moved close to three tons of goods around), I got a little work done on the Chipmunk. It was almost all preparatory, but I now realize the value of having a metal ruler handy. Soon I'll have to upgrade to a larger one. The strips for the top spars were intentionally left rather long; I'll trim them as the wings start coming together and I have a better idea of the required length.

I also freed the horizontal stabilizer from the wax paper. It actually came off without too much grief. S-1 does not fit too well (as described in the article that MKelly graciously sent me). Obviously, some sanding will be needed, both to shape the stabilizer properly and attain a uniform height. I've discovered there is a degree of variance in the size of the 1/16" strips. Some filling will probably be necessary, especially around the leading edge of S-1 (on the left side in the photo).

If all goes well, I will start notching the wing ribs tomorrow.
Chipmunk_Wing_Sticks_Laid_Out.jpg (131 KB | 20 )
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Awaiting_Sanding.jpg (118 KB | 23 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 10th, 2019 at 9:38pm
Looks good! Now is the time to start thinking about how you are going to attach the wing. Is it to be built as one piece or two sides?

IMO, the S-1 joint is a poor design, a weak area that could have been easily done differently. I would have extended the two leading edges to butt up to each other and then trimmed S-1 so that it backed that butt joint. No difference in weight and much stronger.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 10th, 2019 at 11:25pm
Ditto what AK said...looking very good. 
Here's a pic of your stab and I tried to illustrate what Alphakilo was saying and suggest a couple other areas with the gussets at the central trailing edge.  If you don't have some emery boards (finger nail files) make a trip to the nearest Dollar Store and buy a packet of them.  They have one that has a bunch of different sizes and grits.  I suggest getting one of those.  If you have a pair of old scissors you can trim the ends of them to narrow them to sand in tight areas.  DO NOT USE YOUR WIFE'S GOOD SCISSORS, TRUST ME!!! Don't ask how I know!!! :-[ :o ;)
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Awaiting_Sanding_2.jpg (197 KB | 19 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 11th, 2019 at 4:43am
Yet again, thank you for the suggestions! I will rework the leading edge and fabricate a new S-1 piece. The two S-3 pieces will be a little easier to rework.

As regards the wings, I will build them in two separate pieces. I've already cut the spars and leading/trailing edges with that setup in mind, and I figure (though I could be wrong) that getting the proper dihedral will be easier that way. Compared to putting the wings back on a Piper Aztec, that should be a walk in the park!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 11th, 2019 at 8:01pm
A little more progress was made tonight...I started notching the wing ribs. I had previously made a copy of the patterns, so I started with W-1 and W-2. I cut each pattern from the paper with a hobby knife and lined them up. As those patterns were in an area that a fold passed through, I guided off the leading edge. With everything lined up, I cut the notches and did a quick test fit.

I also tried to make a new R-2 piece using a square of balsa from one of the die-crunched sheets. My efforts were not successful. Tomorrow or Friday will see me making more copies of the plans and picking up a piece of balsa big enough to craft new R-2 and S-1 pieces.
Chipmunk_W-1_And_Pattern.jpg (85 KB | 24 )
Chipmunk_W-1_Notched.jpg (73 KB | 24 )
Chipmunk_Wing_Parts_Test_Fit.jpg (98 KB | 19 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 11th, 2019 at 9:41pm
Dan, what we cut with makes a huge difference at times. Until I joined this forum, I made do with the typical Xacto #11 and never thought much about it.

But, as I have learned, that trusty #11 may not be the best tool depending on what is being cut. I've added two other cutting tools to my work bench...scalpel blades and single edge safety razor blades. These are pretty inexpensive on Amazon allowing me to not try and make do with a dull edge. Here are examples:

https://www.amazon.com/Single-Industrial-Replacement-Scraper-Canopus/dp/B073N7X6GJ/ref=pd_rhf_dp_s_pop_multi_srecs_sabr_0_4/134-5590443-4644468?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B073N7X6GJ&pd_rd_r=5a9a11ae-97ce-4a54-9c1f-e1d92c9852e9&pd_rd_w=kkFw0&pd_rd_wg=xd9C4&pf_rd_p=a1791a68-4145-4831-831a-1672308caeb5&pf_rd_r=65TN0ES2Z6TAVPMVQG4Q&psc=1&refRID=65TN0ES2Z6TAVPMVQG4Q

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0079LWFQK/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01MPX3JTI/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The safety razor is a good chopper, the #10 scalpel is very good at trimming tissue, and the #11 scalpel is a good all-purpose tool similar to the Xacto #11.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Rekitus Maximus on Sep 11th, 2019 at 10:54pm
some one makes a model aztec?
nm I'll go google...

I found the exact dihedral is not a problem
getting the first ribs to the SAME angle is more of the issue...

my first rib of each wing bowed in after I got the wings covered.
that also didn't help...
I told my self to add a couple xtra stringers from rib1 to rib 2
on the next build...

a better solution might be to cover with less stretching.
like damp after gluing on the tissue instead of wet tissue covering.

victor

victor

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 11th, 2019 at 11:24pm
As for a cutting utensil you can also us a couple pairs of pliers and snap the single edge razor at an angle for releasing the parts from the die cut sheets or other fine work.  Depending on how you break it...it can be mounted in the xacto handle also.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 12th, 2019 at 3:24am
The scalpel definitely would not have crossed my mind had alfakilo not mentioned it. I also have plenty of razor blades on hand, both single and double-edge...should have been using those from the get-go.

As for a model Aztec, I don't know of one. This was a real aircraft, made of metal. Re-installing its wings (that's the phrase I should have used) required several student mechanics maneuvering the wing into position and another student mechanic in the fuselage bolting the wing in place. On that very warm day, I was inside the fuselage.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 12th, 2019 at 8:28am
This forum and the one at hipppocketaeronautics.com are loaded with help. In addition here are some links and locations where you can find all the goodies folks talk about:

https://volareproducts.com/

https://sigmfg.com/

https://www.wind-it-up.com/

https://easybuiltmodels.com/parts.htm

http://www.bhplans.com/

Locally, visit Wal-Mart, Home Depot or Lowes, Hobby Lobby, Michaels, Harbor Freight, Dollar Stores in addition to your local hobby shop (if you are lucky enough to have one!).

Most models have windows or canopies, so start saving plastic such as milk jugs, food containers, etc to have a stash to go to.

Tom mentioned those highly useful sanding sticks. Also, consider a set of cheap files that come in handy for a wide variety of building tasks. Since we are only using them on balsa, they don't have to be fancy!! For example, from Harbor Freight:




Files.jpg (31 KB | 22 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 12th, 2019 at 6:59pm
Lots of neat items on offer! Sooner or later I will build up a fairly comprehensive model-building toolkit, hopefully without straying from the old-school, low-cost approach I prefer.I

I will pick up some of the dollar store emery boards tomorrow. Work on the Chipmunk will resume soon. As regards cutting out the replacement R-2 and S-1 parts: is there a tool that is well-suited for this purpose and should be easy for me to obtain by means other than online ordering? Or will the #11 blade or a razor blade work well enough?

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Kerak on Sep 12th, 2019 at 9:54pm
Hi Dan...all those gizmos and such...all fine items that really help...and you're correct...these models have been built for many years now...with some pretty basic tools.  You'll do alright to just collect things as you go.  Don't forget to pick up a 200 ton hydraulic press...bandsaw, metal lathe...etc. [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

Speaking of tools...sharp is the key word.  All things go well when working with a SHARP tool.  You can replace dull blades...but that gets expensive.  So...with that in mind...think about learning to keep those blades sharp.  You can get on youtube for some suggestions and help in that area.  The simplest sharpener is actually a small sheet of fine sandpaper.  No kidding!  :)  Of course...there are lots of sharpeners available.  And...clean your blades often...they seem to collect glue, etc.  ;)  These are easy suggestions...that help greatly to enjoy the adventure.  [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

Your Chipmunk is a great model to start with...a well designed kit.  You're on the right tract...track...tack...pathe.  [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

Neal

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 12th, 2019 at 9:55pm
Either blade should do the job. It isn't a matter of what works or not, only a matter of what tends to make the job easier. And much of that boils down to personal preference.

I found that despite my many years of model building, I was unaware of a number of things. Folks here went out of their way to expand my store of knowledge and I am the first to credit them with making this hobby one heck of a lot more enjoyable and productive for me. If you have the same experience, then we are all happy campers!!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by New Builder on Sep 13th, 2019 at 12:08pm
Dan - AK and Neal are right, most any sharp blade will work. For cutting the inside curves on replacement parts, cut them first as cutting the outside curve first may break the part. Also, be careful changing that scalpel blade, I use pliers as it does not have much area to grab onto and it is incredibly sharp. Now, for something I've never heard any commentary on, disposing of used blades. While they are not sharp enough for our use they are still mighty sharp and capable of inflicting damage, someone down the disposal line has to handle the waste that blade is in and if it does make it to landfill, the animal population may happen on to it. I wrap my blades in several layers of blue tape before disposing of them.
Mike

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 13th, 2019 at 12:55pm
Agreed, Mike. I use pliers also and put the old blade into the packet that the new blade came in.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 13th, 2019 at 5:10pm
Proper blade disposal is something that does not get enough attention! I have a couple of blade banks left over from my days of wet-shaving. When I'm done with a blade, I drop it into the slot, and it's safely away from my pets (and any wild animals that may encounter them after the trash is removed from my property) and the disposal workers' fingers.

Mike, thanks for the tip on cutting curves! I will make sure to cut the inside curve of R-2 first, then the straight lines, and finally the outside curve. I'm taking a break from construction until tomorrow, but I did get a sheet of balsa so I can cut the replacement parts.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by pb_guy on Sep 13th, 2019 at 9:50pm
My wife is a diabetic, so we have a 'sharps' container for blade disposal. However, just about every bathroom in a store has a 'sharps' disposal bin, so you can use those for blade disposal if it bothers you to dump it in the regular garbage.
ian

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 14th, 2019 at 1:07pm
Today was the day I got all excited about making the final notches in the wing ribs and building a wing! So I thought, anyway. When making a notch in the second W-6 rib, I broke it. Now I need to fabricate another piece. My idea was to trace around the good W-6 with a pencil and then cut around the lines to form a replacement. However, there may well be a better option. Tips, tricks, hints, suggestions, advice...all are welcomed and appreciated.

I didn't stop progress on the Chipmunk, though. The horizontal stabilizer got a little rework done. I cut out S-1 and the two S-3 pieces, as well as the stringer that fit into the notch in S-1. The longitudinal stringer that was joined to the S-3 pieces looked a little crooked, so I made a new one. I also did as alfakilo suggested and ran a square strip where the leading edge of S-1 once was. The two S-3 pieces will be put back into place later.

There are a couple of ways I could deal with S-1. One is reworking the existing piece or cutting a new one out of sheet balsa. The other is making the leading edge setup similar to the trailing edge, with triangular gussets on either side of the stringer. What do the more experienced builders think?

Finally, the fragility of the wing ribs made me reluctant to dump them back into the kit box. Fortunately, I came up with a solution; I originally had this idea in mind for small sections of stick balsa that may still be useful. I put them in cases that originally held disposable vaping devices. The lids can come off pretty easily, so I wrapped rubber bands around them in case an impish cat got hold of them.
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Rework_Started.jpg (114 KB | 27 )
Parts_And_Scrap_Cases.jpg (94 KB | 28 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 14th, 2019 at 4:34pm
Dan...you might want to reread AK's suggestion...on the leading edges of the horizontal stab.

alfakilo wrote on Sep 10th, 2019 at 9:38pm:
Looks good! Now is the time to start thinking about how you are going to attach the wing. Is it to be built as one piece or two sides?
IMO, the S-1 joint is a poor design, a weak area that could have been easily done differently. I would have extended the two leading edges to butt up to each other and then trimmed S-1 so that it backed that butt joint. No difference in weight and much stronger.


I have several boxes of scrap balsa.  You never know when a piece in the boxes will be just the fit for a repair or part for a new build or replace a damaged kit part.  Stringers in one box, circles in another (spinners laminations/or wheels) , other scrap pieces in another box.  Old shoe boxes make great storage boxes... ;D ;)

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 14th, 2019 at 4:55pm
I see it now...remove the leading edge pieces entirely and cut two new ones that will butt up against one another, much like the trailing edge. I'll fix that tomorrow.

At the rate I'm going, I'll have a shoebox full of little bits of balsa in no time flat! Those little bits will come in handy when it comes time to fabricate the braces for the fuselage formers.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 14th, 2019 at 5:00pm
If you have a fireplace...the small scraps that you'd toss are great for kindling to get a fire started... ;D ;) 8-)  Most modelers throw away very little :o :D ;)

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 14th, 2019 at 5:08pm

Sky9pilot wrote on Sep 14th, 2019 at 5:00pm:
If you have a fireplace...the small scraps that you'd toss are great for kindling to get a fire started.

I do have a fireplace, as I'd suspect most homes built in the 1920s did. We don't use it, as it was previously converted to gas and I'm unsure if any work will be needed to safely burn wood again.

One aspect of the fuselage former braces puzzles me a tad. The plans call for braces on the front only. Would bracing them at the rear be an okay idea, or just unnecessary weight and effort?

Edit: I just noticed that I managed to damage fuselage former C. Added it to the list of parts to make. I'm really glad I bought that sheet of balsa, and I will definitely be more careful with my next build!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 14th, 2019 at 11:08pm

Quote:

One aspect of the fuselage former braces puzzles me a tad. The plans call for braces on the front only. Would bracing them at the rear be an okay idea, or just unnecessary weight and effort?

Uncertain just what braces you are referring to...didn't see them called for on the plans side view of the fuselage.  Usually adding more than what the plan calls for (unless it's a redesign of that part of the plan) just adds weight.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 15th, 2019 at 12:05pm

Sky9pilot wrote on Sep 14th, 2019 at 11:08pm:

Quote:

One aspect of the fuselage former braces puzzles me a tad. The plans call for braces on the front only. Would bracing them at the rear be an okay idea, or just unnecessary weight and effort?

Uncertain just what braces you are referring to...didn't see them called for on the plans side view of the fuselage.

Trotting out an old cliché, a picture (in this case, of a copy of the plans) is worth a thousand words.

Rework on the horizontal stabilizer continues. I made two efforts at cutting a new S-3 piece after excessively sanding one of the die-crunched ones. Another try at it might be necessary, as the side touching the trailing edge seems a little short. But there's much less daylight passing between the S-3 pieces and the square strips, so I'm happy enough...for now. I'll brainstorm a good plan for replacing S-1 later. Later today, I might make another attempt at cutting a new R-2 piece.
Chipmunk_Former_Plans.jpg (106 KB | 30 )
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Again.jpg (104 KB | 31 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 15th, 2019 at 1:17pm
Dan, your redo of the stab looks good.

About those braces, perhaps these are the 1/16" small strips that the plan shows being glued to the formers (dashed lines). Typically, the grain runs up and down in formers making them easy to break when squeezing the fuselage from the sides. Usually, a simple piece of stringer glued 90 degrees to the grain is all that is needed to provide enough stiffness to minimize this problem and at very little increase in weight. If the formers are cut from 1/32" sheet, then the problem is greater, especially if the wood is soft.

In your pic, the braces for formers E and F seem to indicate that the braces do not extend across the whole former. OK, that's because the rubber motor goes thru there. However, I am dubious about the effectiveness of those small braces. For me, I would omit these and, instead, glue a brace across the top and bottom as close to the opening as possible. Having formers break when working on the fuselage is a common problem and anything that I can do to minimize this is good for me. Here's what I mean:
Chipmunk_Former_Bracing.jpg (85 KB | 38 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 15th, 2019 at 2:47pm
The grain on the Chipmunk's formers does run vertically. Makes sense that the braces are put on them! When it comes time to get the fuselage together, I will definitely make them as long and as close to the openings as possible. Having a former break on me would be frustrating, especially since I already have to make a replacement former C.

And thank you, alfakilo, for your kind words. I'm happy to hear that, for a first-time build, my results are st least decent!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Kittyfritters on Sep 15th, 2019 at 8:10pm
That's why the formers in my Simplified Model kits are made of cross laminated balsa.  That way I can lay them out on the sheet for minimum waste when laser cutting without needing to consider the direction of the grain and they don't need additional bracing.

KF

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by MKelly on Sep 15th, 2019 at 9:35pm
Dan,

The marked-up picture AK provided matches Stew Meyers suggestion in his article almost exactly - braces top and bottom across the formers.  Highly recommend this - I've suffered several former crushes on my Typhoon (which didn't have the bracing).

The revised stab looks much better, but don't sweat getting every joint perfect on your first model.  You'll learn and your skills will improve with every one you build, and you'll learn a lot about what works and what doesn't work as you cover and fly your early builds.

Cheers,

Mike

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 16th, 2019 at 4:37am
KF: you make kits? If so, I'd be interested in getting my hands on one.

Mike: I have a copy of the Meyers article saved on my tablet, but not my phone. I'll need to save it on my phone as well. Not every modification suggested will make it into my build, but the braces will.

As regards perfection, I'm more concerned with achieving "pretty good" right now. Were I to adapt the Sir Henry Royce method, I'd crash-land on the funny farm! Another member's signature (I don't recall who) contains a quote from Salavador Dali that relates to perfection.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Kittyfritters on Sep 16th, 2019 at 11:14pm

Dan wrote on Sep 16th, 2019 at 4:37am:
KF: you make kits? If so, I'd be interested in getting my hands on one...


No problem,  http://hjlmodels.com/


KF
(Howard Littman)

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 17th, 2019 at 8:08pm
KF: your NoCal models look pretty good. I'll order one in the not-too-distant future.

Today was a day of brainstorming. I was scarcely able to maintain focus at work, as I was thinking about how to finish off the Chipmunk's horizontal stabilizer. After dinner, I took measurements and did some further brainstorming, then did a quick chore and got going. I eventually decided to trace along the better of S-1's trailing edges, outline the notch, trace the other side, and finally trace the leading edges. When cutting the notch, the new part broke, so I extended the stringer all the way to the leading edge. After test-fitting, I did some sanding...and broke the new gusset. The new stringer was already in place, so I'll make new gussets tomorrow. New gussets and some sanding should have the horizontal stabilizer ready to cover!

I also made a replacement R-2 piece. It is head and shoulders above my previous effort. A set of jeweler's files will need to be purchased before I'm ready to put the vertical stabilizer together. The sheet balsa I bought at my local hobby shop seems to be quite fragile!
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Almost_Done.jpg (103 KB | 34 )
Chipmunk_New_R-2_Piece.jpg (74 KB | 28 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 18th, 2019 at 11:21am
Dan...you can just add gussets to the center leading edges and central 1/16" sq root rib, like you did at the trailing edge.  You're not tied to place the original part there. 

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 18th, 2019 at 6:51pm

Sky9pilot wrote on Sep 18th, 2019 at 11:21am:
Dan...you can just add gussets to the center leading edges and central 1/16" sq root rib, like you did at the trailing edge.

That's the route I took. After I made some usable gussets, I took some photos to show how I did it using S-1 as a template. I traced the better edge and the notch, then turned S-1 over and traced the other line. I traced the leading edges of the stabilizer and made the cuts.

Gluing on the horizontal stabilizer is now done! Once the glue has dried overnight, the stabilizer should need nothing more than sanding (both to shape the corners properly and get a super-smooth finish) before it is ready to cover.

Edit: now that the horizontal stabilizer is nearing completion, I must give consideration to the rest of the airframe. I will have to pick up a sheet of 1/20" balsa so I can make a new wing rib. However, I must seek help with the fuselage and vertical stabilizer. If the notches in the fuselage sides are cut for 1/16," am I better off making formers from 1/16" sheet or using the "Dutchman" method mentioned in the Meyers article? For the vertical stabilizer, am I better off making replacements for the die-crunched pieces out of 1/16" or sanding the sticks flush?
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Gluing_Done.jpg (107 KB | 57 )
Gusset_Making_Part_1.jpg (75 KB | 34 )
Gusset_Making_Part_2.jpg (59 KB | 33 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 18th, 2019 at 10:34pm
Just a little pointer re: the gussets.  the grain of the balsa is suppose to run along the line of  the longest side of the triangle.  This is where the strength of the gusset comes from.  Just for future reference.  You shouldn't need to replace any gusset that aren't like the above suggestion.
Sky9pilot

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 19th, 2019 at 12:03pm
Nicely done! That should do just fine!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 19th, 2019 at 6:11pm
Sky9pilot's advice about the gussets made me consider making new gussets. However, as it was intended for future reference, I decided not to. Instead, I sanded the corners to what should be their final form. It took much less time than I thought it would. The horizontal stab shouldn't need much more than a little filler, final sanding, covering, and installation on the fuselage.

Thanks again to all who have offered help, advice, suggestions, and positive feedback. I am glad to have found this board!
Chipmunk_Horizontal_Stab_Shaped.jpg (88 KB | 45 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 21st, 2019 at 10:40am
I just finished cutting a new wing rib. The rib in question, W-6, is a bit of a weak point; there isn't much room to work with when cutting the notch for the bottom spar. I have also found another hurdle to overcome: Guillow's apparently didn't update the plans with 1/20" between the outlines for the wing ribs. Trying to get all those wing ribs perfectly centered between the lines would drive me up the wall! My plan is to shift all the ribs slightly toward the wing tip or the wing root. Is one way any better than the other?

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 21st, 2019 at 2:26pm
Dan,
Have you made any sanding tools for notches, fitting ribs to leading edges, trailing edges etc.  With diecut/die-crunched parts you'll find sanding parts to fit the locations on the plan are a real help.  I wouldn't shift the ribs in or out...rather sand the ribs to fit where noted on the plan.  This is where the fingernail files/emery boards come in handy. 
I use a hard piece of 1/16" balsa and glue it to a piece of 220 or rougher grit of sand paper.  Once the glue has dried I trim the sandpaper to the 1/16" balsa and even sand the sandpaper flush to the 1/16" balsa.  This becomes my "notcher".  I don't cut notches anymore...I sand in the notch.  This tool makes a perfect fitting notch for 1/16" sq stringers etc.  A sanding tool is one of your greatest assets in Stick and Tissue model building!
Sky9pilot

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 21st, 2019 at 2:42pm
I have not made such a tool, but I definitely will! The balsa I have now is rather soft, so I'll source out a new piece when I return to the hobby shop.

As regards the wing ribs, they would only be moved 0.0125 inches...just enough to make them easier to align. Trying to perfectly center them, with a space of 0.00625 inches per side, would drive me nuts! Of course, if that amount is miniscule enough that it isn't worth worrying about, I'll get cracking on the Chipmunk's wings!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 21st, 2019 at 4:12pm
I'm sorry...how do you measure that amount of movement????  My bionic eye doesn't calculate to that many decimal places!!! :D ;D ;)
That's not enough to worry about!

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 21st, 2019 at 4:30pm

Sky9pilot wrote on Sep 21st, 2019 at 4:12pm:
I'm sorry...how do you measure that amount of movement????

Quite honestly, I don't know. I'm more worried about eating my pizza and test-fitting the Chipmunk's wings!

Edit: I did a little test-fit, and I'm glad I didn't spread any glue! Either the ribs are too long or there was an issue with their trailing edges (a notch that didn't get cut at the factory or I neglected to cut). Back to brainstorming a solution...

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by pb_guy on Sep 21st, 2019 at 11:37pm
The ribs are probably left a little long on purpose. Remember what the carpenter said? "I've cut it twice and its still too short!" Match the front of the ribs to the Leading Edge (LE) and cut off, or better yet sand, the excess at the Trailing Edge (TE).
ian

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 22nd, 2019 at 12:02pm

pb_guy wrote on Sep 21st, 2019 at 11:37pm:
Remember what the carpenter said? "I've cut it twice and its still too short!"

He should have been taught to measure twice and cut once...remind me to never hire that guy!

All joking aside, I believe you're right about the ribs being intentionally left a little long. I will do a test fit later today to confirm.

Edit: instead of a test fit (which is what I did yesterday), I checked the wing ribs under a bright light. None showed any evidence that they were intended to be notched for spar clearance at the TE during manufacture. The plans did not show notches at the TEs, either. I have a little bit of sanding to do...

Edit number two: I have decided to construct an entirely new vertical stabilizer structure from 1/16" stock. I have given some thought to replacing the four die-crunched pieces with a single-piece structure. Is that a bad idea?

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 24th, 2019 at 7:22pm
A little update on the Chipmunk: I inspected the ribs and found that some of their notches were not done very well. Therefore, I will be making a dozen new ribs and going to great pains to get each pair identical. If anyone has suggestions or advice on how to make than happen, I would be most grateful. A piece of balsa suitable for making the notching tool Tom described will be a Friday purchase.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Sky9pilot on Sep 24th, 2019 at 8:07pm
There are many ways to make ribs...here's one that you can use.  Make templates of the ribs (root rib and tip rib).  Sandwich balsa planks long enough and high enough to cover the templates.  Then pin or drill holes through them and bolt them together with long bolts in two places.  Once bolted/pinned together carve the planks close to the templates and then finish by sanding down to the templates.  Once the shape of the ribs has been completed you can notch all the ribs with a sanding tool for the spars as needed.

Here's a link to Airfield Models site on making constant chord ribs: Click Here
Below are a few pics from their site...
download_004.jpg (7 KB | 23 )
06.jpg (19 KB | 17 )
04.jpg (22 KB | 19 )

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by alfakilo on Sep 25th, 2019 at 9:09am
When making copies of a part such as a rib, remember to use the original master to make the other copies. Using a copy to make another copy often results in the parts getting progressively larger because we inadvertently cut on or over the pencil/pen line instead of inside it.

Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Sep 25th, 2019 at 5:09pm
Thanks to both Tom and alfakilo for the advice. I'll make a copy of the wing rib templates on the plans and make some new ribs. Hopefully I can make some progress on the Chipmunk this weekend. I am also considering modeling it for static display purposes...good thing I have yet to start on the fuselage!


Title: Re: Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk
Post by Dan on Oct 9th, 2019 at 7:53am
No further progress has been made on the Chipmunk, but I have done some planning. Though it may seem like an insane amount of work, I am going to scratchbuild a replacement for every die-crunched part. After all that work, I would likely be upset if it were to crash, so it is definitely going to be a static display model. I even have a color scheme planned out for it, but I'll get a few covering jobs under my belt before I attempt it.

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