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Tether Flying for S&T models (Read 265065 times)
Reply #77 - Jun 26th, 2012 at 9:49pm

simpleflyer   Offline
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Yep, a pair of them were foraging for their supper Smiley
 
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Reply #76 - Jun 26th, 2012 at 9:44pm

simpleflyer   Offline
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One vertical stick was broken and the two upper longerons were cracked in a few places.

The two pix show a couple of our 'simpleflyer' repair jigs.  The first one is the longeron cracks being glued and reinforce.  In the second one, the vertical stick is being replaced.  Looks like a furry friend outside at the
A
in upper left corner.
 
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Reply #75 - Jun 26th, 2012 at 9:31pm

simpleflyer   Offline
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Thank you for your comment, Tom.

Quote:
..comet dime Fairchild 24 a while back..destroyed it but it looks like your Stinson...


Coincidentally, after posting the Stinson pix, it suffered some hangar rash when the swing pole fell on the rear fuselage.

At first, we thought we would need to build a new fuselage.  After looking at the damage more closely, it appeared to be repairable without much effort.
 
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Reply #74 - Jun 25th, 2012 at 7:34pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Great stuff simpleflyer Smiley

Love the whole fleet...just did a comet dime Fairchild 24 a while back...grandsons destroyed it but it looks like your Stinson...I bet it would be a great flyer as well....

Lots to try when I get back to Texas.

Keep up the great work and thanks for sharing the great flying photos...

Tom
« Last Edit: Jun 27th, 2012 at 6:53pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #73 - Jun 25th, 2012 at 1:03am

simpleflyer   Offline
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A month ago we were able to capture this flight picture.  Note the small furry observer below and to the  rear of the Stinson  Shocked

A closer view of our visiting friend.

About a week later, it was joined by a sidekick. Wink
 
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Reply #72 - Jun 25th, 2012 at 12:49am

simpleflyer   Offline
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As we experimented with a variety models for tether control flying, the Stinson 108 was tried.  In spite of its small size it has turned out to be a good flyer.

Here are a few of our favorite flight shots.  The last one in the series was taken yesterday.
 

03-06-11.jpg (51 KB | )
03-06-11.jpg
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Reply #71 - Jun 25th, 2012 at 12:21am

simpleflyer   Offline
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The third model pictured in the previous post is a Stinson 108.  It was a 10 cent Comet kit marketed around 1950 and had a wingspan of 12 inches.  As a youngster, it was one of the first models that we built.

When we returned to model building after retiring, it was our return to stick and tissue models.  Mostly, it was an exercise in nostalgia.  At first, it remained a static model to remind me of some happy times from long ago.
 
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Reply #70 - Jun 25th, 2012 at 12:04am

simpleflyer   Offline
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In the previous page of this thread is a group picture of small and simple to fly tether control models.  The cropped view of that picture below show three scale models of 12 inch or less wingspan.

The Ryan ST at the top is the Comet nickel version of about 11 inches wingspan.  It was modified to have sheet balsa fuselage sides and tail surfaces.

The P-51  on the left is about 13 inches wingspan and designed by Herb Weiss.  It was designed as a stick and tissue model with sheet balsa tail surfaces. We modified it by  changing the fuselage side to sheet balsa as shown in the picture.  It is a good flyer for its small size.



 
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Reply #69 - Jun 7th, 2012 at 11:18pm

simpleflyer   Offline
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Quote:
Tom takes care of that most of the time.


Thank you, Tom, for the top of the page comment..

If you have a bit of spare time and a little bit of unused workspace and flying space at work, Eric, go for it.  This kind of flying and building can be done almost anywhere.
 
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Reply #68 - Jun 7th, 2012 at 5:43am

thymekiller   Offline
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Quote:
Just noticed your comment on the title page about the tether models.  Thanks,


If you mean the news caption at the top of the page, Tom takes care of that most of the time.

Soon as I get some stuff cleared off the table, I am going to try tether flying. Looks like fun and I think I can do it at work.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #67 - Jun 7th, 2012 at 1:41am

simpleflyer   Offline
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The straight wing and well thought out design by Northrop is evident in the models fine flying qualities.
 
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Reply #66 - Jun 7th, 2012 at 1:32am

simpleflyer   Offline
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Another small tether model is this F-89.  Also built in the Guillows  'Zip' glider format.  As a teenager, we had the opportunity to see these at England AFB, a large an impressive aircraft.
 
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Reply #65 - Jun 7th, 2012 at 1:21am

simpleflyer   Offline
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Despite is tiny 8 inch wingspan is flies well on a tether line.
 

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Reply #64 - Jun 7th, 2012 at 1:18am

simpleflyer   Offline
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Another tiny swinger was a conversion of this scratch built 'Zip' nocal model of the Navion.  Our first airplane ride was in a Navion in the mid 1950s.
 
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Reply #63 - Jun 7th, 2012 at 1:07am

simpleflyer   Offline
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Eric, Just noticed your comment on the title page about the tether models.  Thanks,

A couple of comments on the Turbo Commander model on the previous page.  We became acquainted with the subject aircraft during the 1970s.  Below is a pic of it in 1981, a beautiful and fine flying aircraft.  Also a pic of the pilots.  On the right is Jerry the chief pilot and on the left is Tom the co-pilot.  Tom had flown Hueys in Viet Nam a few years prior and had some amazing experiences to relate.  Both were excellent pilots and generous gentlemen.  They took me for a few rides in N100TT when the opportunity presented itself and no one was looking Wink  On a maintenance check flight, Jerry allowed me a few moments of stick time.  A memory that I tresure to this day.

Al
 
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