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Radial Engine from foam (Read 3670 times)
Reply #2 - Oct 19th, 2011 at 3:25pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10743
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C.L. ...

I was very helpful in balancing the Helldiver...

To increase the weight I did add a balsa disc on the back and cut out around the cylinders...

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #1 - Oct 19th, 2011 at 7:43am

C.L. Chennault   Offline
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I love YaBB!
Springfield MO.

Posts: 759
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Looks great.  Thanks for sharing that Tom.  I hope to do that someday with a Guillows Stearman.   
Did the motor balance your plane or did you need to add ballast?   

That Guillows Stearman just keeps moving up on the list.
 

What does THIS button do?.........
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Oct 18th, 2011 at 9:53pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10743
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Hi All,

JohnO has set the mark pretty high...

For those looking for a lighter engine for a freeflight model this may give you a little inspiration...Remember this can have as much or as little detail as you are willing to add.  

On most short nose biplanes some nose weight is usually added.  So the detail added can be something that adds appeal and looks to your plane....

Here's the foam engine representing the 420 hp (313 kW) Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp radial piston engine...
I don't have individual parts pictures of this build...OOPS...my slipup when I built the F9c Helldiver...but you will see what I've done...
I used a balsa disc cut from 1/4 balsa as the noseblock/plug with a brass tube as the prop bearing.  
The prop/bearing tube was trimmed later when the engine was finished...  You can see the balsa noseblock at the back...
...
This front shot shows the foam crankcase and cylinders.  The cylinders were formed by cutting strips of foam and then rounding them into rods like dowls of the proper diameter for the cylinders.  Once rounded they were wrapped with thread to simulate the cooling fins with white glue to hold the thread.  Once the cylinders had dried thoroughly, they were split in half representing the front of the cylinders.  These were added to the shaped crankcase with foam safe Cyano...
...
The cowl ring was made from a foam ring cut with a circle cutter and shaped with 400 grit then 600 grit sandpaper... The foam was sealed with thinned white glue and sanded smooth.  Acrylic paint was used to paint the details of the black and green...
...
The pushrod tubes were simulated with balsa strips painted silver with Testor's Enamel paint for plastic models.  This same paint was dry brushed on the thread to hilight the cooling fins in the cylinders.  Much more detail could have been added ....exhaust collection ring, sparkplugs and wires etc...

If you haven't already read JohnO's engine build thread you can gain a lot of detail info there...

I haven't tried it yet.  But you might also try using a thread cutter to cut the cooling fins on the foam cylinders...I would suggest a large nut with coarse threads to do the cutting of the threads....

Here's the engine in place on the Helldiver behind a prop and cooling cowl......

Good luck and don't be afraid to experiment.

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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