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So it's your first Model - Building 101 Spit Mk 1 (Read 63651 times)
Reply #14 - Jul 28th, 2012 at 12:47pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Hope things aren't getting too boring ... Here's the noseblock and prop button and that whole assembly being constructed...

Noseblock is finished sanded to the final shape with the emeryboard and then finished with 320 grit wet or dry sandpaper.  This gives a nice smooth finish to the balsa for applying the tissue. Here's the pics of the finished nose block...

From here I moved on to the prop button, made of black plastic.  I modified this because I didn't want the amount of "standoff" it would cause the prop with the nipple portion left on the front of the prop button.  I shaved this off with the single edge razor leaving a nice smooth flat area for the glass bead bearing to ride on.

I then proceeded to use the pin hole in the ply nose plate as a guide for a drill bit of appropriate size, just under the prop button's diameter.  I wanted a snug fit in the nose block to eliminate any slop when I'm ready to glue it into the nose block. 

This pic show the backside of the nose block and locating balsa strips per the plans.  The components of the prop assembly are shown in both pics...

Here's a couple of pictures of the Prop and nose block assembly put together.  I will eventually bend the prop shaft to work in the free wheeling notch of the prop and cover that with a spinner...

And here's what the assembly looks like on the nose of the fuselage... I will use some sandpaper and a dowel to clearance the former at the rear of the prop shaft so the motor will clear....

Now to get ready to cover.....
Here's a picture of the stuff (technical term for tissue, scissors, gluestick, scheme guides, various razor blades)...

Be sure you cleanup the building area and get rid of all the sanding dust and small pieces of balsa.  To get a nice tissue covering, you need to have a clean and clear work area.  If not you'll get sanding dust, clumps of balsa and other things caught in the glue when you lay the framework down to pick up the tissue for placement....don't ask how I know this Shocked Huh Embarrassed Cry  It's much easier to start with a clean area than to scrape off glue and gunk you've collected in the glue before applying the tissue.  Work neat and clean from the start....

Well next time we will talk about laying out the tissue to cut for the various placements on the wings and fuselage.  Your wings and empennage (horizontal and vertical stabs/rudder) will be the easiest to cover.  When you cover the wings do the bottom first so the top covering can wrap over the edge of the bottom covering thereby making a nice secure seam that won't pull apart...

Till next time....
Tom
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 9:58pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #13 - Jul 25th, 2012 at 8:44pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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Hi Ya'll,

Well no tissue yet....almost broke the wing just touching it so decided to brace it with 1/16 sq balsa sticks. 
I fly outdoors so felt safe adding the bracing...

Following the wing braces, I decided to work on the noseblock.  I used the balsa block from the kit  to make the nose block.  I cut a circle of 1/64 ply (I may have called it 1/32 ply in the pics) It is 1/64 ply for a thrust plate.  This aids in sanding the nose block.  You'll notice it is just roughed in at present still needing finish sanding and tapering in the chin to the thrust plate.  Here's the pics ...

Did things a bit different tonight and labeled the pictures in Photoshop... tried to label the components of the structure to explain what the parts are...

I shall finish the nose block and then move on to the tissue...I added a stringer down the ventral fuselage for a tissue anchor.  The scheme I am doing has one half black the other side "Sky" divided down the centerline of the fuselage...

All done for now...more tomorrow...

Tom
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 9:49pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #12 - Jul 25th, 2012 at 3:17pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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I've added two additional dorsal stringers, one on each side of the top fuselage and am now researching the camo scheme for the MkI Spitfire... http://www.ipmsstockholm.org/magazine/1997/11/stuff_eng_detail_spitfire1.htm

For your first model it's not critical to have a scheme that matches a real aircraft unless you will plan on competeting with it at some contest. This is one difference between "Scale" and "Sport" models.  Scale aircraft are a scaled down version of a real aircraft, hense the term "scale"; whereas "Sport" models can range from looking similar to a real aircraft to some fantasy or minimal flying machine such as the FAC phantom flash: check out Marc's here: http://www.stickandtissue.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1341967579

Lots of modellers enjoy the friendly competition that various clubs offer... FAC (Flying Aces Club) sponsors competitions as well as the western region WestFAC also...these clubs hold competitions and the comaraderie and shared knowledge experienced by participants far outweighs the nominal membership fees...http://www.aeroaces.com/flyingaces.htm  and a video of the club...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EpghGssjVw

Lots of the modellers on the various sites will build scale models of a plane they have seen or know personally thereby using pictures to establish markings that match the real plane.  For competition there is a documentation packet that the competitors make to verify their work for judging the model.  This will come later but usually contains a 3-view of the aircraft, pictures of the aircraft and if the pictures are black and white some written description of the color scheme that has been printed somewhere in a book or on line that can verify the color scheme.  We can talk more about this later... You may want to view some of the other build threads on this site to see what I'm talking about in regards to color schemes...

Well I hadn't planned on this diversion here...so back to the Spitfire Mk I .  I'm planning on doing this aircraft in the first picture below...

I'll post more later as I progress with the tissue.

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #11 - Jul 23rd, 2012 at 8:35am

thymekiller   Offline
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Missouri

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Sorry I did not reply last night, ran out of time.

Excellent use of jigs and homemade tools. It's really great how you show that one or two squares is not enough for a box fuse. I learned that the hard way.  The more, the merrier!

Nice work!!!  Thanks Tom!  Coming along nicely.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #10 - Jul 22nd, 2012 at 6:49pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Well....it seems that when I get wings done, fuselage box done and vertical tail done I have to mockup the parts... here's what it looks like...

side view of mockup...bottom formers were not clamped (oops-forgot last night) so there will be some re-work on the ventral formers. 

I used our fearless leader's suggestions in the Gadget section of this site to make some 1/16 clamps to hold the dorsal formers.  These were made from some scrap balsa sheet of 1/16" .  To show that there are several ways to do this I also used two 1/8" strips held together with small spring loaded clothes pins to hold the #6 dorsal former in place.  I used my balsa stripper to cut the 1/16 slots in the balsa sheet.  I just trimmed one edge straight.  Some of the opposite sides were angled and make things look crooked.  I did find out that not all of my cross members were not exactly aligned with each other upper and lower.  So I didn't always clamp the former to the upper and lower cross members. 
Here's a couple of pics...

This is progressing very well.  I think this will be a really light construction.  I'll weigh it later.  For our newbies a scale is not an absolute necessity but as you progress, it becomes in very handy and mine is a very inexpensive model that weighs to the .1 gram from Harbor Freight Tools. 

I shall be stripping some 1/32 X 1/16 stringers for the fuselage to be applied tomorrow...

Till then happy landings,

Tom
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 9:42pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #9 - Jul 21st, 2012 at 8:46pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Thanks Tim and Thyme...

Today I started the box central fuselage construction.  This is done with the fuselage sides upside down on the building board. 

First I cut two each of the cross members from 1/16 sq balsa sticks.  With the fuselage side upside down we must remember that in reference to the pictures.  What will look like the top of the fuselage is actually the bottom because the actual top longeron is flat and allows the fuselage to be built squarely in the upside down position.  (hope this is not too confusing) 

With this stated the left side of the fuselage is pinned down and using squares (the machinist squares and you'll notice I made 4 additional squares from 3/16 scrap balsa...  I used the  machinist square to cut this balsa and tried to keep each cut vertical.  To assure that the end that will be used as a 90 degree angle are all machine cut edges from the manufacture)  I glued these pieces together making a long inverted "T" which allows me to pin the squares to the building board and hold pieces tight.  This is just one way to do this...check out the thread on gadgets to assist building on this site... http://www.stickandtissue.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1337630800

Back to the fuselage... left side pinned down using the squares to keep the side following the contours of the plan top view...

With the left side of the fuselage in place the top cross members are glued to the left side top edge matching the vertical upright.  When these have been glued to the left side the glue is applied on the right end of the top cross members and the right side of the fuselage is pinned in place using the other squares to hold it in place.  The squares hold the sides pretty square and pins hold the top longerons flat against the building board.  Because the fuselage sides don't angle in at the top or bottom the 90 degree squares hold things straight and allow the bottom cross members to be placed with some tension between the sides of the fuselage. Take your time and if you have a pair of tweesers they will help in holding the small cross member while you place them...remember to align them with the top cross members and side verticals.

If you cut your cross members the same size (very important for a square/straight fuselage) everything will be snug when you glue the bottom cross members in place.  Remember a little glue goes along way.  Lots of glue doesn't add strength...only weight.  If the joint needs reinforcing sometimes I dilute the white glue with water or rubbing alcohol and brush the joints with this solution to strengthen the joint a bit more.  Or I will add a gusset on each side of the joint from 1/32 light balsa with the grain running parallel with the long side of the gusset.

You'll see in this close up, the squares are holding the sides tightly in place allowing the bottom cross members to be put in place.

Here's an overhead view of the fuselage cross members in place and left to dry.  The squares holding things square till the glue sets.

You will notice in the closeup of the nose area the two formers "9" and "10" are place under the nose starting to give shape to the nose area.  The plans only call for a single stringer at the center of the formers to the wing saddle area.  I'm planning on stripping some 1/32X1/16 stringers  that will be place on the 1/16 edge and sanded to a taper towards the tail of the fuselage ala Koutny style to give the fuselage a bit more rounded shape.  I know that with these small models it's important to keep weight down but I like to keep the rounded shape from drooping between formers.

Letting things dry and will add the top formers tomorrow with the stringers....till then happy landings Grin Wink

Tom
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 9:08pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #8 - Jul 20th, 2012 at 9:20am

Tim the Inspector   Offline
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Hey Tom, I lIke the mods you're doing as you go.  IMO this makes any airplane worlds more reliable and more likely to fly for anybody.  Of course, I probably feel this way because you're making exactly the same changes I would.

-Tim
 
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Reply #7 - Jul 20th, 2012 at 9:01am

thymekiller   Offline
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Nice!  I really like the way you made the main wing into 1 piece.
Pretty clever with the wing saddles.  That makes everything easier and, I think, stronger.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #6 - Jul 19th, 2012 at 9:13pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Well that takes care of the fuselage sides and the main wing panels made into a one piece wing.  I just want to show how the horizontal stab panels (rear/tail wing and elevator) were joined  into one piece.

I took the fuselage top view and place a piece of the scrap balsa under it over hanging the fuselage from the leading edge of the horizontal stab to the trailing edge of the fuselage.  I used a pin to poke holes at the leading edge of the stab on the plan along each side of the fuselage and at the tail end to mark the balsa.  I then cut this pie shaped piece out with straight edge and xacto knife.  When I lined this pie piece shape up with the panels I noticed that the pie piece was too long so I marked the leading edge where the elevator would be and trimmed the pie piece to fit.  I then pinned the horizontal stab panels down and aligned the center pie piece with glue and pinned them tightly together...

I will modify the tail area over the horizontal stab with stringers over the formers on the top of the fuselage. I will explain this procedure when we get to that stage of building.

The wing definitely is beginning to look like a Spitfire...can't wait to see this one in the air...

Marc...hope this is being helpful. Cheesy Wink

Till next time...

Tom
« Last Edit: Dec 31st, 2017 at 4:58pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #5 - Jul 19th, 2012 at 8:53pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10675
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BUILDING THE FUSELAGE


I recommend starting on the fuselage by pinning along the top longeron (the top long stick from nose to tail that builds up the side top rail).  Once the pins are in place, the 1/16 sq longeron is placed against the pins.

I like to build the sides from the top down.  I pin down the top longeron and then cut two of each uprights (the 1/16 sq sticks that connect the top longeron to the bottom longeron). You can see them placed above the top longeron on the plans.  You'll also notice a deviation from the plans on the fuselage sides.  I have made wing saddles that will be built into the fuselage sides from the long piece of extra balsa from the print sheet.
Wing saddles...
I used the copy of the print sheet to cut out a #1 wing rib(root rib) to make the 1/16 wing saddles.  I traced the rib on the balsa and added 1/8 inch to the trailing edge of the rib to allow for the trailing edge and 1/32 to the leading edge of the rib for the wing leading edge.  This was tapered to follow the rib outline.  I then allow 1/16 inch over the top of the rib to form the saddle.  This will be built into the fuselage side keeping the stations of the upright in the same places.  Here's the saddles cutout...

Now to continue the first side build up.  I place the upright against the top longeron and aligned the saddle piece to fit the bottom edge and then added the bottom two piece longerons in place against the uprights and pinned the longerons tight against the uprights.
notice how the saddle fits into the side of the fuselage...

Since we are talking about wing saddles....I prefer one piece wings as noted above.  I took the plans and aligned straight edges across the plans leading edges and trailing edges markings on each side of the fuselage top view. I then used some of the 1/8X1/16 inch stick to form the fuselage wing cross members.  I then made 1/16 gussets at each junction of wing rib and cross members both front and back...

Top view showing gussets a bit better...

Before these pieces are glued together I propped up the wingtips 1 5/8" to raise the wingtips to the bottom of the canopy.  The plans only call for 5/8" dihedral (this is the angle of the wing from root to tip with the root rib sitting flat on the building board and the tip of the wing off the building board).

I pinned the root ribs down and propped up the wing in the proper dihedral (most seasoned builders recommend the wing tips to be even with or a bit over he bottom of the canopy for more successful low wing aircraft flight). I then glued the cross members to the ribs and glued the gussets and filed the slots for the spar brace across the center section (1/16 sq stick).  This center section will now match the wing saddle when the two sides are glued together with cross braces from 1/16 sq balsa sticks. 

The two sides will make a central box like structure.  The top and bottom formers will be add to this box structure, which will give the rubber motor an unobstructed run from the nose to the anchor at the tail of the plane.

Now the second side is to be built over the first side...I took some more plastic wrap and laid it over the first side against the pins that lined the outside of the upper longeron. Then built the second side over the first side in the same manner gluing to the top longeron and placing the bottom longerons and wing saddle against the uprights with glue, and pinned the bottom longerons tightly against the uprights. Here's the two sides pinned down together....

continued next post...
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 9:04pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #4 - Jul 18th, 2012 at 3:13pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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On one of the above wing panel pics you'll notice what looks like water droplets which is actually a spritz of the rubbing alcohol from the bottle pictured above. I do this to take the tension out of the balsa that has been bent to match the leading and trailing edge of the plan.  This will allow the balsa to relax and hopefully avoid warping of the structure later when the tissue is applied...

In this picture you can see the wing structure with the rib tips hanging over the leading edge... this will be later cleaned up with the fingernail file/emery board.  I've done a little cleanup in the following picture...

This picture show the horizontal stab panel pinned to the building board and drying...

Here's the completed wing panel and stab panel following some sanding...

Now here's where I'm going to explain how I will modify the plans and build process...  I personally find attaching separate wing panels to the fuselage a somewhat difficult and unsatisfactory process.  With the separate wing panels it is difficult to get the dihedral to evenly match and mount on the fuselage evenly.  I have always preferred a one piece wing where dihedral can be set by pinning the wing to the building board at the center section and propping up the outer panels to the proper dihedral height and allowing the wings to set. Then mounting the wing to the fuselage after it has been covered. 
(This is just my personal preferrence and is not meant to reflect on the quality of the Easy Built Kit in any way. I find this kit and wood quality to be excellent!)

I have gone on to build the other wing panel and stab panel according to the plan as the two previous panels have been built.  The vertical fin/rudder is built in the same manner as the horizontal stab.

Till the next installment...Building the fuselage...

I would be happy to answer any questions this build has raised, so feel free to post any questions during this build.

Tom
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 8:53pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #3 - Jul 18th, 2012 at 2:33pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10675
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Starting the build...

After a confuser snafu yesterday...the computer crashed...was able to get it to operate again but lost all the files... Thank God I had a few files still on the camera card...

Before we can get started building we must cut apart the printed wood sheet.  I encourage you to use a new xacto blade #11 and to be careful to cut just outside the printed line.  As the old adage says: "measure twice cut once!"  If you cut too close to the line you can't put it back on the part easily.  Note I say you can't put it back easily.  You can glue the wood back together but depending on the part cut off it may be  easy or it may not be as easily done.  So take your time and work slowly....

One other suggestions don't try to cut through the wood on the first stroke. I've found several light strokes with the knife will cut out the part without splitting the wood...especially around the curved pieces.

Also note the extra wood at the edge of the sheet...I cut this away with a straight edge (steel ruler) to use later if additional stringers, gussets or a broken piece will need to be made....

Here's the pics of the pieces all cut out...
the print wood is cut out and sanded to line
all extra pieces of wood saved for parts or gussets etc....

Well, after reading the building instructions and the note that the long pieces for the wings and spars should be done first I decided to following the instructions.... Embarrassed Smiley

With all the parts cut out of the printed sheet I would like to point out one way to cut the notches out for the spar.  With these few ribs I use a single edge razor to cut the vertical sides of the notch and the pointed tip of the xacto blade to cut the bottom or horizontal edge of the notch....The top of the rib being the curved part of the rib.  I have covered one edge of the double edged razor with masking tape.  I prefer the double edged razor blade because of it's thinness.  But this should be done by an adult and with adult supervision with these razor blades...

Here's the beginning of the wing panel construction, left wing panel... the leading edge 1/16 sq is in place and you can see the pins placed to the contour of the trailing edge.  The trailing edge was soaked in hot water for approximately 15 minutes to allow the balsa to become pliable...
Trailing edge in place...

Now to glue the ribs in place...I'm using white glue like a beginner would probably use for his first model.  This is a very acceptable glue to use and many modeler's continue to use it.  I recommend placing a small puddle of glue on a piece of scrap paper or cardboard and using a toothpick or similar object to add glue to the pieces of balsa to be glued together. I'm using a bamboo skewer which is a bit larger for my preference...

Here's a rib with glue applied by the skewer...if you can't see the glue that's kinda the point...don't use too much glue a little goes a long way to glue things together with S&T models...

Here's a view of the rib glued to the leading edge...

As the ribs are glued in place I used a small square (90 degree rt triangle) made from some scrap balsa...because this is a small wing panel I didn't use the machinist squares I showed in one of the above pictures.  Once the rib was located and squared up I pinned it in place and then added the spar to keep the ribs vertical.  The only rib that wasn't kept vertical was the #1(root rib).  The angle was set by measuring  the suggested angle of the plan.  I want to modify this plan construction a bit...I'll explain my changes and their reasons in the next installment...here's a pic of the completed wing panel...
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 8:45pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #2 - Jul 17th, 2012 at 8:33am

thymekiller   Offline
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Missouri

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Excellent Tom!!!
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #1 - Jul 16th, 2012 at 9:32pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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To finish out this initial post I had to do it in two parts....

Here's the plans pinned to the board covered with plastic wrap...

I'll be starting this build tomorrow step by step.  I will review the build instructions but not necessarily follow the build instructions to the tee...

Like I said I don't like building fuselages as well as I do wings...so I'll build it first....even if the instructions call for the wings to be built first....

Till tomorrow...

Tom
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 8:36pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Jul 16th, 2012 at 9:09pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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My apologies for the time the pictures were missing.  Photobucket changed their free policy and block all the previously posted pictures.  I didn't pay for the new membership...this was a real debacle on their part!  Please excuse me if some of the reposted pictures are a bit out of order.


Hi ya'll....Here's an attempt to help the beginner in building a Stick and Tissue kit.  As you see I'm calling it Building 101....

I would recommend to every one to start with a sport model if you are new to Stick and Tissue modeling for Rubber Power.  Just so you'll know, you will probably have more success getting a sport model to fly as a first model rather than a scale or semi-scale model.

I know that lots of people start out with a scale model because that's what they've seen and especially a WWII plane, either a Mustang, Spitfire, Hurricane, Me/Bf 109, FW 190 or Japanese A6M2 Zero...

I happened to have in my stash a Spitfire Mk 1 from Easy Built... so we will be building a kit of the Spitfire Mk1.
Here's the kits details...

You'll need a building board of some type...a table that's flat works well with a board over it for protection of the table.  On the top of my building board I have a celotex ceiling tile (2'X4).  I've cut my tile into a 4'X7" strip.  If you have room for a whole tile that's great or cut it to your available size/space.
Here's my work bench and a closeup of the tile showing it's been used several time with lots of pin holes...

Once you have your kit...you will need the following things for a sucessful build...

You'll see some machinist squares I have acquired a while back but some easy squares can be made and I'll explain this later...
I've listed the items on the picture but for clarification:
Glue: Elmer's wood glue or white glue will work fine.  Another glue is Duco Cement which I use and I thin it with Acetone 50/50 in a bottle with a very thin needle like tube for application.  This bottle can be found at several online models supply houses.  Check out the thread on this site for supplies etc.

In the supplies picture you also see; sissors, hobby knife/xacto knife #11 blade etc., finger nail files/emery boards (a large package of assorted files can be found at the Dollar Store)..., a metal ruler 12" or longer (handy for trimming balsa strips etc.), straight pins/T-pins for pinning the balsa to the plans for construction,  optional tools are needle nose plyers and some wire cutters... single edge razors (I recommend that adults use these and not let the kids handle these without adult supervision!)
Under the kit box in the third picture you see plastic wrap.  I use this but wax paper will work also and some people use cooking parchment paper that bakers use to keep bakegoods from sticking to the pan.  A bit opaque (hard to see thru for my old eyes) .

Another tool I recomment is an old hair spray bottle (pump type) that my wife emptied...I rinsed it with water and fill it with rubbing alcohol/isopropol alcohol. This is usually already diluted with water. You can get this from Dollar Store also.   This will be used later to shrink the tissue.

Here's what the kit box looks like on opening it up...

Here's all the parts laid out to show what the kit provides.  The rolled paper is the tissue and the plans rolled together.  The instruction sheet is visible in the open box and at the right of the spread out components...

Here's a picture of the printed wood sheet...I recommend you make a copy of this wooden sheet. If you ever have to make repairs you'll have a pattern available to cut out a new part...

Here's a pic of the plan.... I didn't make any copies of this but I recommend a copy be made of this plan also even if you have to make it in several sections...because it seem my glue or something else always spills on the plan and makes it hard to read or impossible to read... I usually build from the copy and pin the kit plan on the wall over the building board. Tends to be quite helpful.
« Last Edit: Aug 2nd, 2017 at 8:56pm by Sky9pilot »  

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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