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Spirit of St. Louis (Read 27454 times)
Reply #63 - Mar 23rd, 2017 at 7:21am

New Builder   Offline
Senior Member
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 953
****
 
Quote:
That's a great question re: the yellowish tent on the cowl of the Spirit in the Smithsonian!  Anyone out there know the answer to this one?

I know this is an older post and was looking for help with my engine for my Gee Bee R1. Just saw a Smithsonian channel cut on the Spirit Of St. Louis and they commented on the color. They were cleaning the airplane and the lettering began coming off so they stopped and varnished the cowl. It remained clear for about a year then began turning yellow as it is today.
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #62 - Feb 4th, 2016 at 8:37am

guamflyer   Offline

Slope Fast - Soar Deep
Guam.USA

Posts: 38
 
really great build..Always thought about building one..When I had lived in Maui, I made it a point to visit Charles Lindberg's grave to pay my respects..awesome pilot and incredible plane

                    guamflyer " ken "
 
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Reply #61 - May 28th, 2013 at 12:29pm

Warhawk   Offline

Stick & Tissue
Moses Lake, WA

Posts: 18
 
jhuck-80,

Looked twice at your name!

I got a bit more done this weekend, although not a lot.  I started hollowing out the cowling around the engine, and I rebuilt the fuselage frame.  For some dumb reason, I couldn't get the nose to line up where it squeezes in at the front.  The second time, I built the nose frame sides first, sanded in the angle where they meet the side frame, and glued it in place after chocking up the front to the correct angle (remember to make a left and a right).  Then I joined the sides as before, with the area under the wing making the right-angle box, and adding the crosspieces after that.

I should probably get to covering the wing and tail pieces.  It'll be the first time I've covered totally in black (works better with spraying silver - removes a lot of the see-through appearance without adding a lot more paint).

A couple of other things to contemplate - building the cylinders off the plane, and gluing them in place after the painting to reduce the fingerprinting stuff I'm likely to do if there is very much to do after it's painted.  I guess I need to look for some cheap cotton gloves to handle it. . .
The second thing is the struts/landing gear.  A chance to really run up the weight, if I'm not careful. . .
A plus is not having any real windows, so there's not any acetate needed!

Justin
 

Justin
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Reply #60 - May 21st, 2013 at 12:48pm

jhuck-80   Offline
Junior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Baltimore MD

Posts: 94
**
 
This thread is full of my favorite "stuff" from these websites.  The pictures of the finished aircraft are great, and my interest is in making as good a model as possible, but what I really enjoy is the building itself.  As a result, I love going through the build threads where someone really shows exactly what they are doing and explains it.

Also, the nature of this type of modeling is that it takes a lot of improvisation when building, and I love seeing the interesting ways that people get the job done.  Thanks!
 
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Reply #59 - May 21st, 2013 at 8:39am

mitch j   Offline
Senior Member
growing old-no choice,growing
up-optional
Renmark SA Australia

Posts: 388
****
 
G'day Warhawk;
Your engine looks to be coming on fine mate- I can see why the drill press is so handy for getting everything straight. I am looking forward ( I think ) to starting the motor on my Albatros. Looking forward to more pics! (P.S. I heard on the radio that today is the anniversary of Charlie & the Spirit landing in Paris!)

Cheers mate!
 
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Reply #58 - May 20th, 2013 at 3:46pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10656
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I have one of Micro Marc's wish books that I peruse on a regular basis.  I'll have to make me one of those centering tools as well.  Thanks again for the tools pics and info.  Great ideas.

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #57 - May 20th, 2013 at 8:55am

Warhawk   Offline

Stick & Tissue
Moses Lake, WA

Posts: 18
 
Thanks,  I did have one hole that had some balsa that hung on.  The bit was pretty new, and still sharp, which helps.  I also drilled VERY slowly, a big advantage with a drill press - it holds things in alignment as you drill slow.

I think I've sized my jig large enough to accommodate future motor cowling needs - if not, I think I could add to it.  Likely problem would be to keep the chuck from striking the back of the jig, but larger cowlings would mean larger holes, and those bits tend to be long enough I don't think it'll be a problem.

I should probably mention that I love Micro Mark.  They market all sorts of tools, and I leaf through to see what tools I should try to make.  For instance, they have a "center finder" for dowels - it's simply a "V" grooved piece of steel with a piece on top bisecting the "V".  You mark a diameter, turn the dowel and mark another diameter, and the center is where the lines meet.  I made one out of 1/8" hard balsa that works well.  I often use hard, heavy balsa to make my "tools".

Justin
 

Justin
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Reply #56 - May 20th, 2013 at 12:44am

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 3223
*****
 
Looks very nice! Thanks for the pics and explanation. I like the setup and the way you indexed the cylinders.
Clever of you to pilot first. I have trouble with balsa breaking out at the opening of the hole and I never would have gotten the holes in such a nice line with a hand drill.

Excellent use of a jig. Thanks for showing us. 

 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #55 - May 19th, 2013 at 10:49pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10656
*****
 
Nice job.  Well done.  Can't wait to see how she progress from here.

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #54 - May 19th, 2013 at 10:37pm

Warhawk   Offline

Stick & Tissue
Moses Lake, WA

Posts: 18
 
A bit of work done.  I've got the cowling drilled for the cylinders, and I'm posting some pics of the progress.

First, the jig.  It's simply a base with a vertical plywood plate on the end (I used a 3"x3" metal angle plate to assure the plate was aligned).  It simply clamps onto my drill press adjustable height table.  I aligned it by lowering the drill, turning the bit so I could see the point align with the mark on the cowling.

Then I "clamped" the cowling onto a 1/8" brass tube glued into the vertical plate, and added a vertical line on the plate to align the cowling with.

I drilled first with a 1/8" bit, then switched to a 7/32" bit - the same size as the fins on the bottom of the cylinders, and commenced drilling.

After drilling, I inserted the cylinders, and they look at least decent in place.  I haven't glued anything yet - I'll hollow out the cowling, dope, tissue and paint before I glue in the cylinders.  I also still need to build the valve assemblies. . .

 

Justin
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Reply #53 - May 16th, 2013 at 12:26pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10656
*****
 
Life has a way of intruding on our hobby time.   Wink 

No priorities are important and this is just a hobby so as time and schedule allow we work on our miniature aircraft.

We look forward to seeing your jigs.  Always learn new things when we see how a fellow modeler deals with challenges of a build. 

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #52 - May 16th, 2013 at 12:14am

Warhawk   Offline

Stick & Tissue
Moses Lake, WA

Posts: 18
 
I've got a benchtop drill press, and it's much better than trying  to use the Dremel tool thing - it just didn't hold the Dremel vertical enough during the lowering of the bit.  It ended up making oval holes in balsa.  Ok for harder woods, though.  Moot, when I bought the real drill press.

I figure that the jig should be good for all the radials, as long as I've built it big enough.  I'm having to make a model-specific jig for the front fuselage structure, though.  the sides bend in too much to have built them into the sides, so I'm adding on the structure, which requires 3-D alignment.  Since I struggle with 2-D alignments, I NEED jigs!

I'll send pics (assuming it works OK) as soon as I get a chance to actually drill.  Between year-end work at the school where I teach, and my own courses I'm taking, and yardwork and home repairs, I've been even slower than usual.  Everything's marked out, I just need to see about doing the drilling.

Justin
 

Justin
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Reply #51 - May 15th, 2013 at 8:37pm

thymekiller   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Missouri

Posts: 3223
*****
 
Alot of my jigs are also specific to the model at hand.  That's just how it has to be for most models, as far as I know. I have always thought that building the tooling necessary to build the plane was half the fun.   Cool

Would love a pic of the drilling process. There's a drill press in my future. They are very versatile. Probly a tabletop model.
 

",,,The road goes on forever, and the party never ends..."
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Reply #50 - May 11th, 2013 at 9:59am

Warhawk   Offline

Stick & Tissue
Moses Lake, WA

Posts: 18
 
Agreed.  It used to be, I was just interested in finishing the model to the point I could fly it, and my solutions tended toward the one-off type - just get something that worked on that model.  Moe recently, I've tried to think more about the process, and develop methods I like to solve problems for many models - building jigs and tools as I go, and learning from the build.  For instance, I learned on this build that small engine cylinders just don't look right if the fin rings are made from balsa - even 1/64" is too thick.  They must come from card stock.

Have a lot of yard work to accomplish today, so it looks like another day with little progress, but maybe I can finish up the engine cowling section, and the front of the fuselage skeleton - that difficult, nothing's straight section between the wing leading edge and the engine compartment.  I made a couple of jigs, but they're likely specific to this model, so I didn't make anything very fancy or durable - more like temporary cross bars.

Justin
 

Justin
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Reply #49 - May 9th, 2013 at 3:50pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10656
*****
 
Sounds like you've worked it out well.  Part of the fun of modeling.  Figuring out how we are going to make something happen in the modeling process. 

I look forward to your successful solution to the motor on the Spirit!  Smiley

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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