Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Stick and Tissue Logo
 
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegister  
 
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
Dorastonian- Bostonian Fw-190D (Read 9019 times)
Reply #18 - Oct 24th, 2014 at 9:48pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Tried to trim and glide the Dorastonian two days ago.  The original cowling, even though sanded and cut away to lighten was not enough.  It required way too much weight on the tail to balance so I'll be making the second prototype with the modified cowling to see how it goes!  I'm really bummed that I made the cowling so heavy!  I'll start over with a complete build because I crushed the left wing panel leading edge! I'll see what can be salvaged from the first prototype!

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #17 - Aug 22nd, 2014 at 7:23pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Got the panel lines on the canopy with grey tissue.  So I'll call this Bostonian complete!

The Dorastonian 190-D9...
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #16 - Aug 21st, 2014 at 2:51pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Finally got the plug finished for the canopy and was able to plunge mould the canopy from some plastic cookie top container from the bakery dept of the local supermarket.  Worked pretty well.

Here's some pics of it being installed with Aleene's Tacky Glue.  (This glue is pretty good for canopies because it's fairly thick and holds the plastic well and dries clear.)

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #15 - Aug 17th, 2014 at 8:33pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Thanks KF for the insights...that the fun of this hobby!  Lots of new things to learn and use.  I'll look into the ink, I'd heard about them and will check them out next trip to Michael's or similar craft store.

There are a lot of amazing WWII camo schemes. 

Well got some more work done on the Dorastonian... panel lines and markings.  Still have the exhaust and intake scoop on the right front side, gear and canopy to do.

Got out the dremmel tool and wacked out the backside of the built up cowl which really lightened thing a lot. Was very necessary and will reflect the change in the revised plan.  I do like the way it looking not to see if it will fly.

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #14 - Aug 17th, 2014 at 4:54pm

Kittyfritters   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
California

Posts: 618
****
 
If you go to and art supply store you will find they have acrylic ink for air brushes.  It's a bit more expensive than the acrylic paint, but is already prepared for air brushing.  The ink is much lighter than the paint, and is available in opaque, translucent, day-glo, and metallic colors.

I have several years of experience with airbrushing acrylics.  I prefer the ink, but have used the paint successfully. The craft store acrylics are meant for brushing and have very coarse solids in their pigments.  They can be thinned successfully, using water, surface tension reducer (airbrush medium), and, sometimes, a little rubbing alcohol.  They seem to work better using an external mix airbrush at a somewhat higher pressure (30 p.s.i.). 

With my internal mix airbrushes I have had much better results using Testor's Acryl or the Tamaya colors. They come brushing consistency, but have finer pigments and require much less thinning to airbrush.  If you are working on a real scale model you will find the Testor's and Tamaya colors are more authentic.

I do use Krylon before spraying colors.  Krylon #1305 is an acrylic and is completely compatible with the paint and ink.  The trick is to mist it on the tissue and not get a too heavy coat.  The acrylics carry a very heavy load of water so the tissue will sag even though it has been fixed with the Krylon.  When the paint or ink dries, the tissue will be just as tight as before.  This makes it very important that you let each color thoroughly dry before spraying the next color.  This is extremely important if you freehand a camo job.  If there is any dampness in the previous color the slight sag will pick up the over spray from the next color and when it all dries there will be painted on wrinkles even though the tissue is tight as a drum head.

I have used airbrushing frisket sheets as masking, but Orv Olm suggested that I use domestic tissue sprayed with a couple of coats of Krylon and stuck down with repositionable glue stick and it works quite well.  Some other modellers have told me that they have had excellent results using the new Frog Tape for delicate surfaces.

Hope this helps.


 

Qua sublata omnia praecepta legis
IP Logged
 
Reply #13 - Aug 17th, 2014 at 1:32pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Colonel....You're too much!!!! LOL   Cheesy Wink Smiley

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #12 - Aug 17th, 2014 at 12:24pm

Colonel Manfred von Holstein   Offline
Senior Member
Indianapolis, IN

Posts: 283
****
 
Tom, I've read a bit in Don Ross' book about Bostonians. Modeling the long nose fw190D instead of the more common A was a smart move with the squished layout of a Bostonian. Your model is downright long and sleek compared to a Gee Bee. I've several plans for classic models like FA Moths, Aeroncas, Citabrias, and the P51 you mentioned that were modified into Bostonians. It's given me an idea for a model called the Boston Senator. The plan is an old family secret that you tissue-cover with dirty money and shrink with a mixture of Scotch and the murky waters surrounding Chappaquiddick Island. For a small 'campaign contribution' I'll share the plan with you. Wink
 

3 rules of Free Flight: Keep it light, don't build heavy, and it shouldn't weigh much.
IP Logged
 
Reply #11 - Aug 17th, 2014 at 11:53am

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Bob,

Thanks,  I'm really surprised using these craft acrylics with the airbrush.  These paints come very thick in a squeeze bottle as shown below.  You can get them at Michael's, JoAnn's Fabric/Craft stores, or Wally World (Walmart).  They run about $1.50 each.  I haven't gotten the Airbrush medium that is suppose to make it flow smoother and clog less.  I've been mixing the paints I have on hand and they are not the same maker.  This is not the best.  I recommend using the same manufacturer for all the paint.  Like painting a car, use the same product line for consistency!

With it thinned so that you can spray it through the airbrush, it doesn't add hardly any weight.  Just don't slather it on.  Just enough to cover.  It works better spraying on the tissue before using any Krylon. Krylon tends to make the paint bead up like water on waxed car. Because you're spraying it on the tissue, the tissue will sag and look like it does when you spritz it to shrink it.  That's ok because it'll shrink back up.  Hang in there and let it dry completely.  I plan on using the Krylon crystal clear over coat after the markings and panel lines are added.  Fogged on very lightly or the panel lines will run. Don't ask how I know this! Embarrassed Tongue Cheesy

I have a Pasche H airbrush.  It's not internal mix. But does a nice job.  You just have to practice on the adjustment of the air pressure, I keep it right around 20 psi, and then adjust the spray of paint till I get the results I like on a piece of foam board.  I keep something to clean the tip frequently because it tends to dry and clog quickly.  The airbrush medium is suppose to help eliminate this.

I'd give it a shot on the Maryland.

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #10 - Aug 17th, 2014 at 10:16am

bigrip74   Offline
Administrator
What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 6043
*****
 
Tom: nice job with EGG 190, how is the canopy coming? I am still divided on what to do on the camo for my Maryland and your spray on camo may help me out, how much weight does it add?

Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
IP Logged
 
Reply #9 - Aug 17th, 2014 at 12:20am

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Terry...yes the troughs were soda straw glued in after roughing with sand paper to help them stick.  Then used a razor blade to trim them to the balsa.  But be careful the blade can run amuck and bite into the balsa stringers if you're not careful.  Don't ask me how I know... Embarrassed Cry Roll Eyes Cheesy

Colonel...thanks for the kind words.  I was inspired by Roman Groener on SFA and HPA with his Bostang.  You can see mine on this board in the Tuskeegee Airmen scheme.  He really inspired me to try my hand.  I'll be trying another one of some other WWII bird not sure what just yet, maybe Japanese or British... so many planes so little time and money! Grin Wink  It's the Bostonian rules that cause the cartoonish looks.  Fuselage must enclose a virtual box 1.5X2X3 inch rectangle shape.  Limit to 16 inch wingspan. Fuselage length limited to 13 inches front of nose button to the back of the rudder.  This really make them take on some fun looking shapes!

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #8 - Aug 16th, 2014 at 10:58pm

Colonel Manfred von Holstein   Offline
Senior Member
Indianapolis, IN

Posts: 283
****
 
I'm fascinated by people like you that can design new models. The whimsical cartoonish nature of this has a charm all of its own. I can't help but think that all the popular and famous models were first just an idea in someone's head,  then ink on paper,  pins on a building board,  and balsa in the sky.  Very impressive.
 

3 rules of Free Flight: Keep it light, don't build heavy, and it shouldn't weigh much.
IP Logged
 
Reply #7 - Aug 16th, 2014 at 10:41pm

terryman   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Los Gatos, CA

Posts: 865
****
 
I was trying to figure out why the gun troughs were originally red.  Were they made from a soda straw?  What a great idea.

Terry
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #6 - Aug 16th, 2014 at 8:43pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Thanks Terry...
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #5 - Aug 16th, 2014 at 8:00pm

terryman   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Los Gatos, CA

Posts: 865
****
 
Tom,

The 190 is cute as a button and looks serious about flying with the adjustable stab. Hope you will give it a toss when finished. There's also the hyper fast looking Lorenz contraction thing going on even while it's standing still! Smiley Smiley.

Terry
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #4 - Aug 16th, 2014 at 6:59pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10914
*****
 
Dorastonian in camo and starting of markings. Here's the latest progress. I'm beginning to enjoy using this acrylic craft paint.  Hardly any weight and looks pretty good.  Still going to get some airbrush medium, suppose to help in flow and keep the needle from clogging.

Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print