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Fast way to build stick fuselages & tools to make (Read 2573 times)
Reply #13 - Oct 29th, 2019 at 10:18am

alfakilo   Offline
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From Mike's Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/Excel-Blades-Swivel-Rotating-American/dp/B0006O5JF6/ref=s...

The small blade swivels as the knife is drawn around a curve. Makes it easier to cut out tissue decals.
 
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Reply #12 - Oct 29th, 2019 at 8:57am

New Builder   Offline
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I switched to Excel blades and they seem to be of much better quality than some of the others. The 3/8" #17 chisel blade is my go to for cutting stock for stringers and they are shaped as shown in the above pic with a bevel on one side of the blade. Amazon carries them and I enter "excel craft blades.
Click here: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=excel+craft+blades&ref=nb_sb_noss_2
Mike
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #11 - Oct 29th, 2019 at 7:18am

alfakilo   Offline
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Picked up some safety razors and will give them a try. Blade thickness seems to be a definite concern when cutting verticals for Peanut or Dimer models since small errors show up as pieces that don't fit very well.

The Xacto chisel blades pretty much remove that error but I'm not sure that they are sharp enough for making cuts without crushing the wood.
 

Blade_error.jpg (11 KB | 7 )
Blade_error.jpg
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Reply #10 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 4:07pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Thanks Ian...
I just couldn't get to drawing just what you drew and it explains it perfectly! Smiley
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #9 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 12:47pm

alfakilo   Offline
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I'll try that too.

Thanks very much for the help, Ian!!
 
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Reply #8 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 12:08pm

pb_guy   Offline
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I would use the double-edge razor blades over the thick stuff. However, I find that the blades used in the disposable razors are very sharp, and possibly even thinner. But be really really careful taking them apart or you will slice yourself up! I use a Craft blade to cut off the melted stubs on the backside of the holder and then pry the plastic apart with the same blade.
ian
 
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Reply #7 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 11:55am

alfakilo   Offline
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Got it! Me too on the smaller wood. What do you use for the blade? I usually use a new single edge razor but am thinking of trying a double edge to get a thinner blade.
 
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Reply #6 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 11:15am

pb_guy   Offline
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Yes, marks. But the marks are actually cuts that mark the location where the final cut is to be completed. Since I cut smaller wood, it would be marked and cut at the same time.
ian
 
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Reply #5 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 8:28am

alfakilo   Offline
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pb_guy wrote on Oct 27th, 2019 at 11:00pm:
The real trick to all of it is raising the sides vertically so that the cuts can be made on the wood in situ.
ian


Did you mean that the marks can be made in situ? The article seems to say that the verticals are then removed and the cuts are made on the cutting block.

In any case, I've always been lousy at getting the verticals to fit well, so I'm very interested in any technique to help with that.
 
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Reply #4 - Oct 27th, 2019 at 11:00pm

pb_guy   Offline
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The U-shaped piece is to add stiffness to the cutting blade so that it won't buckle. You could use a craft razor for the final cut if you wanted. The real trick to all of it is raising the sides vertically so that the cuts can be made on the wood in situ.
ian
 
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Reply #3 - Oct 27th, 2019 at 9:25pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Thanks, that's better! I think I misled myself in thinking that the label on the stick indicated which end was which. Apparently not so.

Not sure I understand the purpose of the U-shaped cutout on the cutter end. Xacto makes a #18 chisel blade that looks to be an effective marker and perhaps a cutter as well.
 
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Reply #2 - Oct 27th, 2019 at 4:40pm

pb_guy   Offline
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So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

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Hopefully, this diagram will help. The marked piece is put on anything that you want to cut on. Any board will do.
BTW, Word will also save a file as a PDF, so you don't have to have Word to read it later.
 
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Reply #1 - Oct 27th, 2019 at 10:35am

alfakilo   Offline
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I've tended to avoid box fuselages in the past since I've found cutting the vertical supports to be difficult to get right.

This article is very interesting but I'm having trouble visualizing what he's saying.

1. The marker. I understand the need to get the correct angle for the vertical top and bottom cut, but I don't understand the tool he's describing. Can anyone explain it?

2. The cutting block. I think he's describing a small cutting surface where the wood grain is 'up' or vertical, the idea being that when cutting the stick, this 'softer' surface minimizes wear on the blade. Is this correct?
 

marker.jpg (22 KB | 5 )
marker.jpg
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Mar 11th, 2015 at 12:49pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Here's a tutorial on building stick fuselages and how to make tools to make it faster and easier.  It's similar if not the same author of the video "Lavoie Method" only this is a printable tutorial I've captured on MSWord.  I have not been able to find the author and contact him for permission so if this violates any copyright or he does not want this posted please contact administration and it will be removed at our earliest opportunity. Thanks you...Admin
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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