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Guillow's S.E. 5 super detailing (Read 23052 times)
Reply #55 - Feb 6th, 2017 at 12:35am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Good day.  For those of us who witnessed, it was one heck of a Super Bowl today.  Thought I'd get back to the "beginning" of the build by starting at the front end. Prior to the start of any detailing, means research as much as reasonably as possible.  One of the many prominent features of the S.E. 5 is the broad, flat, in-your-face, radiator.  As with just about many other features of the S.E. 5, nothing is consistent or the same.  There are slight variations between radiators as the drawings and photos will show.  Some also have brightly polished louvers and others will have the louvers painted olive drab and the list goes on.  I decided on replicating the b+w photo # 188, of the S.E. 5 as it gave me a lot of close-up detailing to which I could use as reference.
 
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Reply #54 - Jan 30th, 2017 at 2:13pm

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MicroMark rivet decals were used here, over a piece of glossy paper cut out to fit over the front end of the exhaust manifold.  I used paper instead of plastic because to me, it was easier at this scale,  to cut very small and tight circles to fit over the blunt front end.  An overall coat of copper was first applied.  Then a light spray, almost like a mist, of flat black was highlighted over the copper but light enough to allow the copper to show through.  This gives the exhaust manifolds a "burnished look." 
 
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Reply #53 - Jan 30th, 2017 at 2:04pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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The long exhaust manifold to the S.E. 5 is one of many defining characteristics that many people look for.  To replicate it as close as possible, I used this b+w photo (personal collection) as supplementary reference that is also found over the Internet.  Evergreen plastic tubing was used and the photos are pretty much self-explanatory.  The last picture shows a test-fit, prior to adding the extra detailing and paint.
 
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Reply #52 - Jan 30th, 2017 at 1:39pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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To summarize this portion of detailing: MicroMark offers hinges in small scales mostly for doll houses, but as you can see here, they were used for both the top deck panel and the side hatch just behind the cockpit.  The window was made from thin strips of black electrical tape over a clear plastic piece cut into a square.  The next picture shows how easily the black electrical tape conforms around the plastic and adheres to the top decking; and finally topped off with rivet decals.  The last picture basically summarizes all of the detailing that went into the fuselage.  Each part required a separate assembly and a little bit of patience and imagination.  Yes, it's a Guillow's kit and the more you look at it, the more this simple, plain, and boxy biplane entertains the eye.
 
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Reply #51 - Jan 30th, 2017 at 12:17am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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I purposely added this picture out of sequence to show what my goals are in adding the extra detailing to the trough area.  I also showed one of two finished side panels that will fit over the lite ply and under the gun while conforming to the shape of the trough.  Because the panels, however tightly fitted together, will show the underside lite ply is the reason behind painting the lite ply in the first place to help "hide" the wooden surface that will show between the sides of the paneling.  I started out by using a pen lightly tapped with a small hammer to emboss some larger rivet detail on the exposed side.  Next, I used MicroMark's rivet decal (HO sized)on the small strips of side straps.  These decals actually stick out and add dimension to the whole rivet detailing.  I could have used larger sized rivets, but subtlety is the key point here.  If you'll notice on the edges of each panel, they're curved such that they will slide under the gun to fit the curvature of the trough.  The lite ply will be completely hidden. I can  now add the previously prepared panel that fits between this trough and the pilot's cockpit.  Both of these two panels nearest the cockpit are then covered with a heat-shrink film called Solartex.  I like this film simply because it already comes in the colors I wanted for this model (in this case, overall olive drab) and it has a very nice fabric weave pattern.  One of the unique -and challenged- aspects of the full-sized S.E. 5, is that the two panels nearest the cockpit and front windshield with the squared hole, are fabric covered over a solid surface underneath, whereas the remaining panels from that point forward will be metal covered.
 
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Reply #50 - Jan 30th, 2017 at 12:05am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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The trough and lite ply are now complete.  It's a tight fit.  I also took the liberty of painting the trough as well as some of the areas around.  Can't paint a trough with a machine gun resting on top. We still have just a couple of extra steps to go before this area is complete.
 
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Reply #49 - Jan 29th, 2017 at 10:26pm

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In my previous post, picture # 134 shows the machine gun resting in between the two formers (bulkheads).  There really isn't much in the way of support underneath for the gun, and the real aircraft has what appears to be a "trough."  You can also see that I added what appears to be a heat shield underneath the gun barrel to protect the blast from the gun to the top decking of the fuselage.  So, it was another step backwards to take two steps forward.  First, I had to look at it from a profile to ensure the machine gun was elevated slightly upward as on the full sized plane.  Then added a glossy paper "trough."  The cut and shaping of the trough was really just kind of "winging it through by trial and error."  Next, a 1/4' thick soft balsa former was added to both the nose of the trough and to the rear to help give some shape to the curvature of the ply covering as well as with side supports to the gun trough.  As on the previous steps, 1/32" lite ply was used for the top decking with a cutout for the machine gun trough.  You can see the necessity of the added balsa former and support on either side of the trough to take the stress of the lite ply being pulled over the curve of the top decking as its being glued in place at the same time.
« Last Edit: Jan 29th, 2017 at 11:59pm by Skyediamonds »  
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Reply #48 - Jan 29th, 2017 at 7:33pm

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With the window cut out to be featured for the next top deck covering, I initially cut out another 1/32" lite ply piece.  But wait!  I forgot about the Vickers machine gun!  So, I made what I thought would be a good cut-to-fit.  Wrong.  As you can see from the next picture, starting with the roughest cut and progressing down to more finer and closer tolerances, I made the "grade." Practice and more practice, combined with patience and more patience certainly applied here.  With the final fit tested, you can see that it appears loose.  It will actually fit tighter when everything is glued down.  Its just that this builder was holding the model in one hand while trying to take a picture with the other.  When everything was settled, I used the remaining photo paper of the butcher block and laminated it to the final cut of lite ply.  At this point, I thought now I can simply glue this next section and move forward from here.  Wrong again!  As I will show in the next subsequent steps.  Hmmm, on this little boxy S.E. 5, its reputation of nothing being easy and simple continues... Roll Eyes.
 
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Reply #47 - Jan 29th, 2017 at 6:35pm

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The next step requires a little bit of thinking along with imagination.  In this case, it's the next front covering over the top of the fuselage.  However, you will notice a square window immediately in front of the windshield and cockpit area.  The reason?  The instrument panel itself is located so far back deep inside the recesses of the cockpit interior, the pilot couldn't see the instruments.  So, the designers simply cut out a square window through the top decking just in front of the instrument  panel to allow some sunlight to shine through and bingo, problem solved.  These next several pictures will illustrate such a "solution."  In photo # 121 of the model, you can barely notice some of the instruments located along the side panels.  To give some perspective, the main instrument panel itself is further back than the rear cabane top wing strut...  Tongue
 
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Reply #46 - Jan 29th, 2017 at 5:19pm

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Now we come to the stage of closing up the cockpit interior leaving a circular cutout.  Lite 1/32" ply was chosen at this point due to: 1) its strength for its thickness and 2) to its flexibility to conform to the curves of the upper fuselage decking.  A paper pattern was used to help develop the cutout and overall shape of the wood covering.  As noted from the b+w photos (personal collection), the cockpit appears to have wood veneer lining on the upper half and fabric covering on the lower half.  Since we're only concerned with the upper half at this point, once again the remaining paper from the butcher block photo was cut out and laminated to the ply cockpit piece.  Why wooden veneer to line the interiors of cockpits?  I can only guess to help the pilots enjoy the "luxury" of wood paneling while flying and fighting in a freezing cockpit.  Feedback is welcomed here. Cool













 
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Reply #45 - Jan 29th, 2017 at 2:04pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Sky9, the detailing really is easy.  It's just patience and imagination that challenges most modelers, me included.  Thank you!!  I also watch other modelers on this site to see if I can learn from them.  It's a two-way street.  Sincerely,  Skye
 
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Reply #44 - Jan 28th, 2017 at 8:40pm

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You make the detailing look easy!  Thanks for sharing!
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #43 - Jan 28th, 2017 at 8:11pm

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We now prepare the rigging by using silver-colored thread through small .060" diameter brass tubing cut to length to simulate the turnbuckles, knot the ends of the threads, glue the brass tubing to each knot and  lay them aside.  The vertical framework of basswood is cut to thin strips and also cut to fit vertically within the cockpit interior,  sanded smooth, and stained Pecan.  From there we use the prepared rigging to simply glue the turnbuckle ends to the locations along the bottom brackets  *-make sure they're super glued apprx. 45 degrees to face the opposite end of the link-* and also super glued the opposite ends to form a diagonal pattern.  The pilot's seat is added.  The final picture shows lots of "bling" and Ooohs and Ahhhs.  Only things missing are the control column with its British-unique circular hand grip, some levels for throttle controls and some accessories to complete the whole interior.   **A point to note here:  There are no "turnbuckles" at the top ends of the internal rigging, because when viewed from the outside looking into the interior, they will not be noticed anyway.   The best part is, its all very simple, and just takes small steps and lots of imagination.   
 
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Reply #42 - Jan 28th, 2017 at 7:44pm

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The completed cockpit is almost there.  As the inboard profiles show (one of which is imported from Poland courtesy of fellow modeler, Mieczwslaw Komendzinski) we have the "faux" vertical and horizontal wood frame supports that was mentioned some time in the previous postings, to be added to the model structure.  Again, basswood was used and cut into thin strips, sanded and stained Pecan  that were approximately the width and size of the framework on the real aircraft.  From there, I used glossy paper cut to size and sliced apart such that the remaining thin pieces would bend around the wooden framework and leave other pieces upright.  For sharp contrast, the "brackets" were painted black.  Now we see how all of this is starting to really help pull the interior together. All of these steps really aren't complicated, doesn't require special tooling, or use of metals.  Just patience and a willingness to use a little bit of imagination.
 
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Reply #41 - Jan 28th, 2017 at 7:14pm

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With the exception of the seat belts, something was missing and the paper laminations were pretty obvious around the top edges.  I thought it would be nice to give the pilot's seat a bit of "pizzazz" and add some railings to serve as armrests.  Using a small .060" (1.5mm) half-round plastic strip from Evergreen plastics, I carefully glued one end to the chair and simply bent the plastic to follow the curvature of the chair all around to the other side and cut off the remaining plastic strip.  Now we have a completed seat.  Only thing needed was to paint the white plastic.  I gave it a black coat of paint to simulate the black leather that is sometimes used around the seats and to help give some contrast to the light butcher block patterns.
 
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