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Building a Wright Flyer Engine (Read 8311 times)
Reply #10 - Jan 15th, 2017 at 2:08pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

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I've seen many Wright Flyer engines, but none have opened the cooling holes to the cylinders.  I decided to go just a bit further and use a pin vise to drill out some of the cooling holes.  I also used small springs easily obtained at a local arts and crafts store for the springs used in the rocker arms.  Here,  you can easily see the strip of plastic with rounded ends to be used as platform to hold the cylinders in place during assembly,  laying off to the left side and everything is now painted a dull silver.  This platform is where all the cylinders will be glued in place. Comparing the b+w photo of the real engine, I  noticed a textured band surrounding each cylinder.  I simply used a strip of tissue and doped it onto each cylinder. It is also in this photo that you'll see my needle nose pliers holding a "pin" to be used for the small springs on top of the engine.  Comparing the model engine at this point with the picture shows we're almost there.  The last picture shows the use of rub off transfer letter "o'" being used to simulate the back of the engine.
 
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Reply #9 - Jan 15th, 2017 at 1:43pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

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Here are the pictures illustrating the cutting and sizing of the cylinders made from plastic tubing
 
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Reply #8 - Jan 15th, 2017 at 1:41pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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From this point forward, with few exceptions, the sanding will be held to a minimum as the plastic sides and accessories are added to the basic engine block. In the following steps. I added some "sides and feet" to the legs supporting the engine block.  Next, was using a T-pin on the back side of the plate and pushing out rivets.  You can see discern the ink markings to help carefully line up the "rivets."  The last photos will show the addition of the cylinders made from cutting the approx. sized plastic tubing from Evergreen plastics.
 
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Reply #7 - Jan 14th, 2017 at 1:50am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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After the cutting, the plastic was then glued to the sides of the engine block.  You can now easily see how this engine is starting to come together.
 
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Reply #6 - Jan 14th, 2017 at 1:46am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

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First off, I am a firm believer in using whatever available materials that will help me achieve the best results for the least amount of work.  I know it sounds a little obvious or crazy but for me, it works anyway.  I've found that by use of plastics and sometimes, glossy paper, will give the best results without having to sand, fill, resand, fill some more, sand again, prime, then sand with ever finer grades of sand paper.  Plastics, the flexible thin sheets we find around our households offers smooth surfaces without the extra steps of sanding.  With that in mind, I started the engine to the Wright Flyer with a block of balsa wood wrapped in plastic. Noticed in the beginning that I filled the "back" end of the balsa to achieve that distinctive bulge on the Wright engine. Then I scored a piece of plastic to help me bend it.  I then removed the tape after the filler was dried to have a "lip" between the wood and the plastic to be glued.  After the filler was sanded round, I glued the plastic.  Notice the scored line that will help with the bend.  After the plastic was bend, a small "lip" was formed at the bend line itself.  This will come in handy later.  Next, I traced the outline of the body of the engine onto another piece of plastic and cut alone the lines.  I also hollowed out a small opening and used a black marker to darken the interior.
 
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Reply #5 - Jan 14th, 2017 at 1:19am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

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LoL...Livingroom (wow, now that's a great user name) and staub, thank you guys for those compliments.  They're really appreciated.  Sometimes we all toil for hours forgetting the ultimate rewards in the end.  I'll start posting some builds tonight.  Thank you again.  If anyone should have any questions or comments, they're all welcome  -Skye
 
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Reply #4 - Jan 10th, 2017 at 2:24pm
LivingroomFlight   Ex Member

 
That looks amazing. Reminds me of those animals living on the beaches of Holland, looks like complexity is similar Smiley

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MYGJ9jrbpvg
 
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Reply #3 - Jan 10th, 2017 at 8:34am

staubkorb   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Germany

Posts: 1328
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Wow!  This is one of few AFFORDABLE static models of the Flyer that I've considered purchasing!  I haven't done so simply because I have not been able to "look in the box"  (I like to see what I'm getting into).

I think I know where my next spare ducats are going...
 

WWWoFF
Wonderful Wacky World of Free Flight
(with a bit of rc thrown in for giggles)

Comparing Spammers to a pile of organic waste is an insult to the organic waste!
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Reply #2 - Jan 9th, 2017 at 4:05pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

Posts: 2498
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I should add a couple of shots of just the engine.  Might help to give it a since of scale and show off some of the detailing.
 
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Reply #1 - Jan 9th, 2017 at 3:46pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Enjoying life and all
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Reno, Nevada

Posts: 2498
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Like the S.E. 5, I'd like to start off this thread by displaying some finished examples and then go into the details of how the model was finished.  I believe that many of our members will be curious as to how the engine was detailed and to this end, I promise I won't disappoint.  I will also share my details on the drive chain mechanism and the proper way it was rigged. 
 
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Mar 12th, 2017 at 11:37pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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Skyediamonds shared this tutorial on building an engine for the Guillows Wright Flyer.  Thanks to Gary for this informative and illustrated build!
Sky9pilot
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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