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Guillow's P-51D Mustang (yep, another one) (Read 25174 times)
Reply #14 - Jun 14th, 2018 at 11:10pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Just removed the laminated strips from former B8....
 

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Reply #13 - Jun 14th, 2018 at 10:51pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Tom,

Really appreciated your "thinking outloud" and your response.  I took the dimensions of the laminated woods into consideration.  As mentioned previously, I measured that the front end of Guillow's model is too slim compared to the front end of the 3-views.  To make up the difference, instead of covering with tissue -which has almost no thickness- I hope to compensate by gluing on  1/16" planks of balsa all around the existing sized formers and thereby increase the overall thickness on top of the nose ( & overall dimensions around the front fuselage) and match up where the laminated 1/16" squared balsa strips are located.  Still, I figured I was also going to add some additional thickness to the nose just by virtue of applying filler where needed to help smooth out the edges between planks.  I also (hoped) figured that it's better to have slightly too much, in which I could sand down, than not enough where it might be more difficult to add wood and build it up.  Or, should I have gone the other route?  Open to suggestions/inputs.  Thanks.
 
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Reply #12 - Jun 14th, 2018 at 10:42am

Sky9pilot   Offline
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If you're laminating 1/16" sq balsa strips won't that make the shape 1/8" too big for a proper fit? Wouldn't the use of 1/32"X1/16" strips laminated be better, but still 1/16" too big sitting on the outside of former #B8?  Just thinking outloud here!
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #11 - Jun 14th, 2018 at 7:17am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As noted in my previous post, former B8 is actually only used to support the cockpit coaming outline and not the instrument panel.  The instrument panel itself is tucked under the coaming in a more vertical position.  To rectify this, I knew that some kind of outline of former # B8 still needed to be there to which the planks of balsa glued to the outside forming the "skin" of the fuselage to be attached for maintaining the fuselage contour up to where it ends under the front windshield in a slight curvature.  So to help get around this, I simply laminated strips of small 1/16" square balsa around the same former B8 to get the exact shape.  To obtain the length of the 1/16' strips.  I simply "rolled" former # B8 over the strips to achieve the desired length and cut off the ends where the rolling stopped. 

Why the lamination?  This is used to help "hold" the smaller 1/16' square strips of balsa in maintaining the correct curvature or shape of the fuselage.  Simply bending a strip or even a couple of strips to the curvature of the fuselage cross section, they will not hold that shape.  The strips will simply straighten out.  Yes, they'll be slightly bent afterward, but they won't be in the exact shape desired.  Laminating them together will solve that problem by forcing the strips to retain the curvature of the former # B8.  Does all this make sense?

In another words, there absolutely had to be some sort of support to which the planks of balsa forming the outside "skin" of the fuselage can be attached, as they come to the end under the front windshield and still leave room to tuck under the instrument panel.
 

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Reply #10 - Jun 14th, 2018 at 7:09am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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If anyone noticed:  The cockpit coaming as depicted on the model plans can be misleading.  It shows what appears to be an instrument paneled shape part # B8 to be glued at a slight angle just behind the front windshield and the Free Flight Balance Point. 
 

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Reply #9 - Jun 14th, 2018 at 7:05am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Not bad....
 

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Reply #8 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 7:36pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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The build commences....

On the last picture, you can see how I reduced the curvature of the belly scoop to the fuselage.  This is easily seen by comparing the plans with the actual model laid on top.
 

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Reply #7 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 7:31pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Here's a double mind-blowing post:  First, is a close-up of the riveting details that were produced from the pounce wheel and ....secondly, the chrome vinyl went on smooth over the bare sanded balsa.  In another words, I just might (possibly, conceivably, hopefully) skip the tedious filling, sanding, filling in again, sanding again, priming and then sanding some more.  Just go straight to covering with vinyl. It does seem thick enough to allow for such imperfections of the underlying surfaces. Hmmmm  At least, I have optimism .....   One thing I did notice, is that I'll have to handle the chrome vinyl with kid's gloves or something close to it.  It does tend to scratch easily.  All inputs here would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Reply #6 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 7:28pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Let's see the results.  Aha!  success!  I tried different means of riveting including double riveting to simulate panels that overlap each other as well as panels that simply butt against each other.  On the latter, I would've painted flat black that portion where the two panels meet in order to blank out any signs of light-colored balsa from peeking out.  Anyone notice something else?  Before going to my next post, see if you can distinguish anything different about how the chrome vinyl is covering the scrap fuselage.
 

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Reply #5 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 7:20pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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The technique in this case is to run the pounce wheel over the backside of the chrome vinyl using a metal straight edge.  Then peel off the sticky backing from the vinyl and affix the section to the fuselage.  Here, the pounce wheel shows up a little bit better.
 

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Reply #4 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 7:17pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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For my experiment, I purchased what is called "pounce wheels" from MicroMark.  Over the past few years I've bought dozens of really neat stuff from them, such as: rivet decals (they really stick out like miniature rivets), decal solutions, small punch & die sets,  and they've never disappointed me.  In this case, I read in their catalog that these "pounce wheels" come in different sizes (scales) & can be used to simulate rivets.  Wow!  What a great short cut to making rivets.  In this (obviously staged) picture, they really don't show up well next to the X-Acto knife and scrap fuselage and the roll of chrome vinyl.
 

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Reply #3 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 7:10pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As in most of my previous builds, it's always a good idea to practice on scrap or proof-of-concepts.  In this case, I fabricated a scratched section of a "typical" fuselage to try out this "new" chrome vinyl.  I had read numerous articles and reviewed dozens of build threads that to achieve good results, required lots of sweat and preparation of the surface to a smooth glass-like finish.  I finished off the ends of the "practice" fuselage by using different wood fillers and primers.  However, I purposely left the center section bare balsa but sanded smooth, just for comparison purposes.   You can easily see the strips of balsa wood planks.
 

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Reply #2 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 7:00pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As can be seen from these photos and previous ones, the forward fuselage cross sections needs to be enlarged.  As stated at the beginning, I intend to cover it using chrome vinyl.  This meant use of strips of 1/16" balsa with a combination of infill and straight liminations on top to give the fuselage surface a foundation to which to attach the chrome vinyl.  The thickness of laminationed balsa strips should help make up for the difference in cross sections and thereby allowing me to skip any complicated cutting and enlarging the fuselage formers.  At least that's the theory.
« Last Edit: Jun 14th, 2018 at 6:58am by Skyediamonds »  

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Reply #1 - Jun 13th, 2018 at 6:54pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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To start:  research is over (see how fast that was?).  Truth be told, everyone knows all about Mustangs.  I decided to make the Guillow's kit as accurate as (reasonably) possible.  For those who have seen my S.E.5 and Wright Bros' Flyer builds, you know how "reasonably" that can be.  It's probably better classified as OCD, but we won't go there..... Grin  My research has lead me to obtain some very accurate 3-view drawings.  To my surprise, the Guillow's Mustang came pretty close in scale fidelity.  The fuselage cross section only needed to be enlarged from the front of the canopy forward to the nose, whereas the rest of the fuselage to the tail remained spot-on.  Even the vertical tails matched up perfectly.  Other than the forward fuselage cross sections, the curvature of the belly from the air scoop was much sharper on the Guillow's kit than the 3-views.
 

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Jun 13th, 2018 at 6:42pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Good afternoon guys,

I'm going to be modeling a Guillow's P-51D for my daughter.  It was her idea and she insisted on it.  I tried to talk her out of it.  Lord knows, I really tried, but she wouldn't have anything else but that "D" model Mustang.  Sooo.... after looking at all the build sites on S&T, I've decided to open up a new topic.   I'm going to start off by doing just what I've always done prior to building a model.  Research.  This time, I'd like to finish it in natural metal.  But instead of painting it silver and finishing it off with marking pens delineating panel outlines, rivet details, hatches and so forth,  I'm going to try something new.  I'm going to try covering it with chrome vinyl that is similar to "Flight Metal" or plumber's chrome-finished duct tape.  If all else fails, I'll probably resort to painting it overall silver and use marking pens.....  The enclosed pictures show the Mustang in its natural metal finish.  What a lot of people don't realize is, although the fuselage and tail structures were left in natural metal.  The wings, save for the leading and trailing edges which were left in their natural metal state,  were puttied over and painted silver; photo # 2 showing the Mustang in a left banking turn revealing the wings is a good example.  The rudder and elevators were fabric and painted with silver as well.  So my goal, with your inputs is to produce a Mustang that will appear with a highly polished metal finish.  Specifically, I'd like to model this after Big Beautiful Doll (my daughter's idea).  Any inputs, comments or suggestions, (moral support) will definitely be welcomed.  Gary (Skye)
« Last Edit: Jun 14th, 2018 at 6:51am by Skyediamonds »  

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