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Guillow's P-51D Mustang (yep, another one) (Read 12542 times)
Reply #223 - May 19th, 2019 at 1:42am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As you can see from the next set of pictures of different plastic models of the Mustang including the real one, I have my answers.  One shows the variable outlet door open and the other completely closed.

As you can see from the last picture, even though the variable outlet door is completely closed, the ramp to the radiator is still very much exposed.  This means I would have to fabricate a complete ramp/cooler/variable outlet.  Only this time, I'll follow Tom's original suggestion about a "Drop-Box" cockpit and employ a "drop-box" complete assembly into the (soon to be) large cutout.

So, I (now) know that I'll have to perform some major surgery.
 
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Reply #222 - May 19th, 2019 at 1:28am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Now comes more research into the area of ducting the radiator and oil coolers.  As you can see from all of the enclosed pictures, they give me a very good idea of what I can expect to do, they still do not give me all of the information I really needed.

Do I just cut a small slot?  Then from there, I add a variable outlet door?

Or do I cut whole thing out including the ducting, coolers & variable outlet doors?

I then had to resort to using pictures from plastic models as my next reference source as the next posting will reveal some answers.

 
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Reply #221 - May 19th, 2019 at 1:10am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As you can see from the first picture, my approach to flattening out the underside of the fuselage was really working out well.  Sooo, I figured why stop now?

Wrong. 

As you can easily see from the next two photos, I went too far and sanded right through the original infill.  Shoulda stopped when I was ahead.  I wonder how many of us have done the same thing in Life.

Oh well, I can always cover it up a bit with some Spackling Compound and "sand to shape" from there.

Lesson learned.
 
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Reply #220 - May 10th, 2019 at 8:35pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Good afternoon to one and all,

I made some progress today.  I started sanding the fuselage belly balsa strips overlay down to the original infill.  My careful planning actually worked this time.

The first picture shows the "before" sanding and the rounded belly is easily seen.  The fuselage is upside down and this shot is as if you were near the nose, looking at the air scoop toward the rear tail.

The second picture is obviously posed for this shot, but it does illustrate what my intentions were and how I approached the idea of "flattening" out the bottom of the fuselage.  It also validated what I've been planning all along and that was to "sand to shape" the fuselage.  Sort of like a sculpture slowly removing bits and pieces of a large block to help reveal the artwork inside.
"
The third picture shows what appears to be an oval flat area.  This is where I started sanding the extra balsa down.

The fourth picture shows where I am now.  That flattened area goes all the way down the curvature of the belly scoop to near the tail wheel area. It's not going to get the underside of the fuselage nearly as flat as it is on the full size Mustang, but it's something that I'm comfortable and helps me to add the doors to the radiator and oil coolant systems and still be within "tolerances" of trying to achieve a reasonably close-to-scale model. 

Next step, I'm going to add some Spackling Compound.  Besides filling in the wood grains and gaps,  I will mold it a bit and when dried, sand that into further shape.  So, it'll be a bit more "flatter" still.  Then the whole fuselage will get the same treatment of "sanding to shape" followed by more Spackling until I'm happy with the final results. 

From there, my intentions are to cut out the areas for the radiator door, oil vents and  tail wheel.  Once that's done, then I'll finish the cutouts and add primer and start the cockpit interior. 

I figured by following these steps in order, I can sand away as much as needed and avoid as much saw dust as possible getting into the cockpit detailing.   
 
 
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Reply #219 - May 9th, 2019 at 11:17am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Alf:

Thanks.  I'll still keep you updated as I progress.  Thank you for your suggestion and glad to know I wasn't alone in my observation of the squarish belly.

I should add, that when sanding down the fuselage to "shape" I will sand the belly more flat to help square off the underside.  That extra balsa planking will give me that option.  It won't be perfect, but it will be better than a totally rounded bottom.
 
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Reply #218 - May 9th, 2019 at 11:11am

alfakilo   Offline
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Looks good and I think the cooler door will work out fine now!
 
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Reply #217 - May 9th, 2019 at 11:03am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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In my attempts to start off modifying the underside of the fuselage,  I tried using 1/8" square balsa strip as a starting point to change the profile to a more "squarish" section.  I even soaked the wood.  Hmmmm

Then I thought of something that dawned on me and referenced to the drawing of the fuselage.  This time, I decided to overlay the model fuselage on top of the drawing.  This is where I discovered that the fuselage planking had achieved my original goal of "fattening" it up to match the outlines. 

It was at this point, that if I decided to add more material to square off the fuselage, then it would be too much and out of outline and scale.  So, I'm back to my original plans of adding the double planking and then "sanding the fuselage (down) to shape."

Here, you can see the "before" double planking and the nose outline from the drawing is just visible behind the model fuselage;  and "after" the double planking as the fuselage is laid over the drawing and you can easily see that it's pretty fat.  It will require me to sand down the fuselage to the outlines of the drawing.
« Last Edit: May 10th, 2019 at 8:33am by Skyediamonds »  
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Reply #216 - May 9th, 2019 at 10:53am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Alf:

I decided to take up on your observation and suggestion. 

First, I decided to reference to the scale outlines of the Mustang that I've been using as a guide along this build.  The drawing shows the fuselage profile.  I then focused on the belly area. 

Just as importantly, the drawing also reveals inboard sections of the fuselage  and they were arranged in alphabetical order.

Looking at the drawings showed that the fuselage is indeed, "squarish" along the belly scoop area and then blends into a roundish area around the tail section.  This is especially noticeable along sections labeled "F," "G," "H," and "I."
 
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Reply #215 - May 9th, 2019 at 10:21am

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Alf:

Now that's one cool model!  Really looks timeless.  I never would've thought of that.
 
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Reply #214 - May 9th, 2019 at 7:16am

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Skyediamonds wrote on May 8th, 2019 at 10:10pm:
I thought (briefly) why not finish the Mustang in a "Woody" finish?  Sort of like those wood-sided station wagons in the 50's, Chris Craft boats, as well as  the old Bellanca and Curtiss aircraft which also had wood sides finishes that rivaled that of classic wood furniture.  Lots of wood stain, and heavy on the varnish....  I think it would be so cool. 
 


I think it would look great!

Back in the 70s, I bought this Berkeley FW-190 UC kit and fiddled with it for a number of years before deciding to finish it as a display model using the planking in the kit as a starting point. I think I used a shellac to finish it with. Many years later, here's the result...doesn't look a bit different from then!!
 

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Reply #213 - May 8th, 2019 at 10:40pm

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If you can recall, I pre-fitted the front cowl to the nose of the model to see if double planking would even be viable.  Turned out that I could do it.

As the third picture shows after completion of the planking, that front cowl is (now) really tight. 

That got me to start thinking about the rest of the fuselage and how I was going to "sand to shape."   Yep, lotsa sanding going to be done here.  I also had to double check the belly air scoop plastic piece and see how that was going to fit.

As the last picture shows, the planking around the plastic air scoop is oversized.  This is exactly what I wanted.  I figured it would be better (not necessarily easier) to sand down the planking to fit the plastic scoop rather than trying to cover it up with either additional wood filler, which would be awkward and probably look out of place or using some kind of filler such as Spackling Compound. 
« Last Edit: May 9th, 2019 at 10:44am by Skyediamonds »  
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Reply #212 - May 8th, 2019 at 10:10pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Bob:

I thought you would appreciate this posting of the wood strips around the cockpit area.

The first photo shows the rough strips.  I often wondered if many of our fellow modelers will lightly sand their projects before posting and make it all seem soooo perfect.  Well, I'm here to tell ya, it ain't so with me.

After I finished adding the last strip of balsa.  The beveled ends looked like they were almost braided.  The thought of those classic Chris Craft Barrel Back boats that used to cruise around the lakes back in the 1950's came to mind.  They had the most beautiful laminated wood finishes anywhere! 

I thought (briefly) why not finish the Mustang in a "Woody" finish?  Sort of like those wood-sided station wagons in the 50's, Chris Craft boats, as well as  the old Bellanca and Curtiss aircraft which also had wood sides finishes that rivaled that of classic wood furniture.  Lots of wood stain, and heavy on the varnish....  I think it would be so cool. 

Ahem, back to reality, the second picture shows the same rear decking around the cockpit but only after lightly sanding.  As you can see, the strips are almost starting to disappear.  Those slight dips and undulations will eventually be sanded smooth, but I wanted you to see how this is all turning out, before the strips disappear completely. 

Well, I've finally finished the stripping of the whole fuselage.  Now I can "enjoy" the one thing I've been trying to avoid since the very beginning of this build.  In fact, it was part of my mantra.  But no longer.  It's called..... sanding.  And more sanding.  In this case, I'll be sanding a lot.
 
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Reply #211 - May 8th, 2019 at 8:25am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Alf:

That sounds like a great idea.  Let me see if I can also figure out how to bend the 1/8" square stringers to compound curves without breaking, to follow the contours of the rear fuselage around the belly and air scoop.  There are some pretty sharp curves.

I'll also need to find away to fill in the space between the original double-planked skin and the 1/8 stringers and "new' skin such that I can cut out the scoops and tail wheel areas.

I'll definitely kick it around.
Thank you!
 
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Reply #210 - May 8th, 2019 at 7:01am

alfakilo   Offline
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To my eye, the scoop is more than "somewhat" squared off...it is definitely squared off!! And the fuselage behind the scoop is more squared off than rounded on the bottom making it look a little "boxy".

The model is relatively small so changing the contours of the scoop and rear fuselage shouldn't be too difficult, almost an extension of your double planking.

Perhaps this...run a 1/8" stringer from the scoop inlet to the tail on each side. Then add 1/16" planking to the stringers. This thickness may allow some sanding to round things off a little. Filler to finish things off.

Something like this, looking nose to tail:

 

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Reply #209 - May 8th, 2019 at 1:48am

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That's the problem of trying to replicate the actual aircraft in miniature...I definitely see what you're speaking of...but I'm sure you'll find a solution! Smiley
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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