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Guillow's P-51D Mustang (yep, another one) (Read 9700 times)
Reply #231 - Jun 15th, 2019 at 12:23am

heywooood   Offline
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it's a Mystery
san diego

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the endless struggle of model building...what am I willing to accept or like the horrible Kenny Rogers song says "you gotta know when to hold 'em..know when to fold 'em - know when to walk away, and know when to run"

I hit that point a dozen times on the P40 project alone...
 

"you made that from a box full of sticks?...What is WRONG with you!!"...Mrs. Heywooood
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Reply #230 - May 31st, 2019 at 7:54am

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

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This is what is happening to me. I spent almost a month at my drawing board developing ways to get my model to be the best I could do. In my past life as an aerospace designer we called it analysis paralysis. I think today we call it OCD. Nevertheless, we will have some nice models.
Mike
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #229 - May 29th, 2019 at 8:21pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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I find that if I'm not too careful I get carried away with the details.  Of course you're going for way beyond the details I ever try to duplicate in my models.  Looking good Skye!!!
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #228 - May 28th, 2019 at 10:20pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Reno, Nevada

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I touched up the areas that needed  more work.  If you look at the previous post of the large cutout at the lower right hand corner, you can just barely see a small cut.  I tackled it here. 

Although too tiny to be seen through pictures, there are (were) several itsy bitsy cracks and imperfections along the edges that warranted attention. 

Getting closer....  and this is the underside of the fuselage! 

I gave the wingtips the same treatments. 

Neal,

This is a true definition of dedication of giving into OCD and risking the burnout.  I'll get it done one of them days.....
 
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Reply #227 - May 28th, 2019 at 10:16pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Now the fuselage underside is given a spray of primer to help see which spots need to be done over or touched up. 

Looks like I'm getting closer.....
 
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Reply #226 - May 27th, 2019 at 10:36pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As you could well imagine from my last post, that cut for the radiator inlet ramp was a rough cut. 

The time now for filler, using the ol' tried and true Spackling Compound. 

The second picture shows that with some careful application of the filer compound and sanding, the results were not too bad.

However, I noticed that some improvements to the cuts for the oil cooler, the radiator inlet ramp and tail wheel could be made using more compound, allowing it to dry and then carefully trimming/ sanding, the results yielded a more squared and clean cut along the edges. 

The second and last pictures show what I'm trying to achieve.  In the second picture (among many other details) the right side of the cut to the large radiator inlet ramp is slightly curved inward.  I decided to use some more compound to help reshape the edge.

The last picture shows the right edge more straight; and so it went back and forth, adding some compound here, cutting there, sanding some more and going on and on with each cutout.

The tail wheel was next and so on.
 
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Reply #225 - May 23rd, 2019 at 8:50am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Well, I must've repeated myself twice on the planning stages.  Now it's time to start cutting out the openings.  I started out marking with a pencil.  Believe it or not, pencils really do work on wood; and get this, you can erase the marking just like as if you were working on paper. 

Next I cut the openings using an X-Acto knife.  This allows me to carefully cut through some of the more fragile areas and to help me access which areas I should sand off instead of cutting and which areas I can cut using a little more force.  Had I decided to use a Dremel with a rotating saw blade, I think I would've ended up causing more damage, as there's a risk that thing could get carried away and literally end up cutting far more than intended.

The end results here, looks pretty ragged and that's to be expected.

I chose to cut first, rather than adding filler compound to the overly sanded areas as I wanted to be able to see which areas I should be careful and which areas also had the formers within the fuselage to help me determine how to cut around them. 

Besides, I would be adding filler anyway and might as well avoid doing the same thing twice (which I ended up doing anyway).
 
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Reply #224 - May 23rd, 2019 at 12:21am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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The first step was to start researching exactly where to cut the openings for the radiator, oil and tail wheel.  I also needed to supplement the drawings to help me determine exactly how much material would need to be cut away.

In another words for the radiator cooler for example, do I simply cut a small slot the width of the fuselage and install the ramp from there?  Or do I cut out the whole area and install both the radiator screens, the ramp and the side walls?  Once again, the drawings and plastic models came to my help.

The first picture shows the detailed drawing of the underside of the fuselage and the general outlines of the cut outs.  But that was as far as it goes.  I needed more information and the next couple of pictures helped me to determine to the extent I needed to cut away any wood material.

I included photos of the full sized Mustang and the variable inlet ramps in open position.  As you can see they're very detailed and close up but not enough information provided to help me determine the areas needed to be cut away.

In the end, it was the plastic models that really gave me the detailed information.  One depicts the ramp fully opened and the other showed it to be fully closed.  Now I know I would have to perform major surgery and cut out (far) more than a simple slot.
 
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Reply #223 - May 19th, 2019 at 1:42am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As you can see from the next set of pictures of different plastic models of the Mustang including the real one, I have my answers.  One shows the variable outlet door open and the other completely closed.

As you can see from the last picture, even though the variable outlet door is completely closed, the ramp to the radiator is still very much exposed.  This means I would have to fabricate a complete ramp/cooler/variable outlet.  Only this time, I'll follow Tom's original suggestion about a "Drop-Box" cockpit and employ a "drop-box" complete assembly into the (soon to be) large cutout.

So, I (now) know that I'll have to perform some major surgery.
 
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Reply #222 - May 19th, 2019 at 1:28am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Now comes more research into the area of ducting the radiator and oil coolers.  As you can see from all of the enclosed pictures, they give me a very good idea of what I can expect to do, they still do not give me all of the information I really needed.

Do I just cut a small slot?  Then from there, I add a variable outlet door?

Or do I cut whole thing out including the ducting, coolers & variable outlet doors?

I then had to resort to using pictures from plastic models as my next reference source as the next posting will reveal some answers.

 
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Reply #221 - May 19th, 2019 at 1:10am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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As you can see from the first picture, my approach to flattening out the underside of the fuselage was really working out well.  Sooo, I figured why stop now?

Wrong. 

As you can easily see from the next two photos, I went too far and sanded right through the original infill.  Shoulda stopped when I was ahead.  I wonder how many of us have done the same thing in Life.

Oh well, I can always cover it up a bit with some Spackling Compound and "sand to shape" from there.

Lesson learned.
 
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Reply #220 - May 10th, 2019 at 8:35pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Good afternoon to one and all,

I made some progress today.  I started sanding the fuselage belly balsa strips overlay down to the original infill.  My careful planning actually worked this time.

The first picture shows the "before" sanding and the rounded belly is easily seen.  The fuselage is upside down and this shot is as if you were near the nose, looking at the air scoop toward the rear tail.

The second picture is obviously posed for this shot, but it does illustrate what my intentions were and how I approached the idea of "flattening" out the bottom of the fuselage.  It also validated what I've been planning all along and that was to "sand to shape" the fuselage.  Sort of like a sculpture slowly removing bits and pieces of a large block to help reveal the artwork inside.
"
The third picture shows what appears to be an oval flat area.  This is where I started sanding the extra balsa down.

The fourth picture shows where I am now.  That flattened area goes all the way down the curvature of the belly scoop to near the tail wheel area. It's not going to get the underside of the fuselage nearly as flat as it is on the full size Mustang, but it's something that I'm comfortable and helps me to add the doors to the radiator and oil coolant systems and still be within "tolerances" of trying to achieve a reasonably close-to-scale model. 

Next step, I'm going to add some Spackling Compound.  Besides filling in the wood grains and gaps,  I will mold it a bit and when dried, sand that into further shape.  So, it'll be a bit more "flatter" still.  Then the whole fuselage will get the same treatment of "sanding to shape" followed by more Spackling until I'm happy with the final results. 

From there, my intentions are to cut out the areas for the radiator door, oil vents and  tail wheel.  Once that's done, then I'll finish the cutouts and add primer and start the cockpit interior. 

I figured by following these steps in order, I can sand away as much as needed and avoid as much saw dust as possible getting into the cockpit detailing.   
 
 
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Reply #219 - May 9th, 2019 at 11:17am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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Alf:

Thanks.  I'll still keep you updated as I progress.  Thank you for your suggestion and glad to know I wasn't alone in my observation of the squarish belly.

I should add, that when sanding down the fuselage to "shape" I will sand the belly more flat to help square off the underside.  That extra balsa planking will give me that option.  It won't be perfect, but it will be better than a totally rounded bottom.
 
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Reply #218 - May 9th, 2019 at 11:11am

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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Looks good and I think the cooler door will work out fine now!
 
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Reply #217 - May 9th, 2019 at 11:03am

Skyediamonds   Offline
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In my attempts to start off modifying the underside of the fuselage,  I tried using 1/8" square balsa strip as a starting point to change the profile to a more "squarish" section.  I even soaked the wood.  Hmmmm

Then I thought of something that dawned on me and referenced to the drawing of the fuselage.  This time, I decided to overlay the model fuselage on top of the drawing.  This is where I discovered that the fuselage planking had achieved my original goal of "fattening" it up to match the outlines. 

It was at this point, that if I decided to add more material to square off the fuselage, then it would be too much and out of outline and scale.  So, I'm back to my original plans of adding the double planking and then "sanding the fuselage (down) to shape."

Here, you can see the "before" double planking and the nose outline from the drawing is just visible behind the model fuselage;  and "after" the double planking as the fuselage is laid over the drawing and you can easily see that it's pretty fat.  It will require me to sand down the fuselage to the outlines of the drawing.
« Last Edit: May 10th, 2019 at 8:33am by Skyediamonds »  
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