Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Stick and Tissue Logo
 
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegister  
 
 
Pages: 1 2 3 ... 18
Send Topic Print
TOM AKERY PLANS COOKUP? (Read 4553 times)
Reply #256 - Yesterday at 6:16pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10660
*****
 
Bob...here they are...

By the way...if you've got a model that has a radial engine with rocker arm bumps this is an easy way to duplicate them by making one mold and plunging multiple copies of the bulges/bumps/humps/bubbles whatever you call them.  You can also make gear strut faring for fixed gear aircraft etc.
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #255 - Yesterday at 5:57pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10660
*****
 
A couple of things.  I just hold the plate in my bare hands and heat a section of the plastic plate big enough to go over the mold. 

I support the mold in the clamp as the picture shows and then with my hands plunge the plastic down over the mold till the plastic is straight down from the mold to avoid the tendency of the plastic to curl out from the mold at the bottom.  This works fine for small molds like machine gun bulges on wings and fuselages.  Scoops and exhaust farings that aren't too ornate or large. 

I've found for canopies and other larger objects the larger the sheet of plastic (when vacuum forming) going over a canopy mold or larger scoop or bump/bubble etc the plastic doesn't get as thin because it isn't stretched as much.  It is important to remember when using a vacuum former to raise the mold off the platen at least 1/8" to 1/4" to avoid the stringers off the corners and the bowing out from the bottom of the mold. 

It is important to heat the plastic evenly till it sags then immediately plunge it over the mold...both in plunge molding or vacuum forming.  If the plastic is not evenly heated the hottest section will stretch more than the other parts and thin the plastic unevenly.  I hope this makes sense. 

Some people will make a female former from cardboard or other thin stiff material with a hole approximate 1/16" larger than the base of the mold.  Attach the plastic to the bottom of this former.  Heat the plastic till it sags and then plunge the plastic over the mold through the hole in the former which pulls the plastic around the mold tighter than straight plunge molding.  Bigger molds will require this female former to successfully plunge mold them. See Mike Stuart's site step three for plunge molding canopies: Click Here  it show the female former for the canopy.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #254 - Yesterday at 10:27am

alfakilo   Offline
Senior Member
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 806
****
 
Some questions on your 'plunge' method. Do you support the plastic in a frame before heating? Do you push the plastic over the mold or do you push the mold into the plastic?

I have had mixed results with the plastic plates. When making a spinner, often the plastic stretches so much that it is too thin to be of much use. I mount the plastic in a frame and then heat that over a hot plate until the plastic sags. Then I push the frame down over the plug. Makes a nice shape but too fragile. Maybe heating the plastic too much? Or maybe the spinner plug was too big for this.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #253 - Yesterday at 12:20am

bigrip74   Online
Administrator
What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 6031
*****
 
Tom, she is looking good and I want to see your plunge bumps in place.

(note) I have not been getting email notifications of new posts.

Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
IP Logged
 
Reply #252 - Jul 15th, 2019 at 3:59pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10660
*****
 
Still haven't covered the bottom of the fuselage with tissue but decided to work on the scoops, bumps and humps for the "Fang".  I used the plunge method to make those "scoops,bumps,humps".  Make one form and then you can make as many of the same thing as you need.  I use the plastic picnic plates from the Dollar Store.  Heat with the Monokote heat gun and then plunge the plastic over the mold.  I usually attach the mold to a skewer, popcycle stick or just the length of balsa shaped at the end for the needed mold.  I have a ratcheting clamp that holds the mold off the table.  I only had red picnic plates left so I need to restock in the other colors.  Not always available, yellow, black, blue, white and sometimes other colors like orange etc.
Last pic is the clamp and shows the first spinners (that were too pointed) I made for the Dash 8.
I used some acrylic hobby paint in light brown to tone down the bright red plastic.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #251 - Jul 14th, 2019 at 8:56pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10660
*****
 
Thanks fellas...
The wingspan is 27" and I just blew up the Pseudo-dime scale model.  I like the 27" span models...just like the way they come out and from my rc days bigger always flew better, seems true with rubber power also.  Plus my hands do better with bigger models.  Those little one look great but are a challenge to these fingers!!! Grin Cheesy Wink

Neal...I love the shots with the prop spinning...here's my Bostonian Bostang B-51 Red Tail...
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #250 - Jul 14th, 2019 at 6:41pm

neoflight   Offline
Full Member
...now how am I gonna
get that down!
West Tennessee

Posts: 187
***
 
Marvelous, Tom Smiley Your wood and tissue is so pleasing to the eye. Can't wait to see the finished клык

Neoflight
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #249 - Jul 14th, 2019 at 6:38pm

Kerak   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Roy, Utah

Posts: 2147
****
 
What did you say the wingspan is, Tom?  Looks huge! Shocked  Beautiful work, kid!  Smiley

And today in class...all the children had fun with their cameras...my entrée.... Smiley  Seriously...I'm in love with blue!  Wink Cheesy Grin  That's a slow shutter (1/8th sec) with no flash...and only a handful of turns...otherwise OSCAR would leave the county.  Camera is hand-held...should use a tripod and shutter release cable (do they make those anymore for these simple digital jobs?).Smiley  "READY...ACTION!"

Neal
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #248 - Jul 14th, 2019 at 2:09pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10660
*****
 
Got the components covered yesterday and sealed with Krylon Chrystal Clear Gloss.  Just finished putting all the components together now and I like the looks of this bird more and more.  I also fared in the bottom of the fuselage  after the wing was glued in place. A half former for the mid point and 1/16" sq stringers 1/4" apart to give some strength to the bottom of the fuselage.  I still have to cover the faring on the fuselage and at the wing roots.  Still have the cockpit details and all the bumps and bubbles as well as the canopy to do.  Then the paint, I'm planning to use the airbrush and Dr. Martin's India Ink which goes on very light and easy.  Here's the pics of the faring of the bottom of the wing and the components glued together...Fang is coming together.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #247 - Jul 13th, 2019 at 3:35pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10660
*****
 
Sorry to hear that your domestic orange tissue couldn't hold up wet.  I like Hallmark tissue for the bright colors, seems to hold up better.  I try to check out the Hallmark store every holiday, Easter, Christmas, Thanksgiving, Halloween etc. They always put out their holiday tissue for those events and it usually is a higher quality paper.  Orange and Black at Thanksgiving and Halloween, you know the traditional colors for the events.  Sometimes Easter can come up with some very nice pastels for those civilian aircraft models.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #246 - Jul 13th, 2019 at 3:19pm

alfakilo   Offline
Senior Member
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 806
****
 
I too am having a couple of covering issues. I found some very nice orange domestic tissue for the X-1 (maybe Xmas stuff) and tried it out. Really like the color but the tissue rips easily if wet. Also found that it did not remain stuck and came loose during shrinking. I had prepped the frame with dope and good sanding. Glue was Elmers glue stick. Not too sure that I want to cover the model with this. Probably would be OK if I just used small pieces at a time.

So I ordered some orange Esaki from Pecks. Meanwhile, I think I'll start that inkjet camouflage project.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #245 - Jul 13th, 2019 at 3:07pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10660
*****
 
I got some planking done and made the mistake of coating the 1/32" sheeting and the planking of 1/8" sanded to shape with thinned yellow carpenter's glue.  After that dried I sanded it with 220 and then 400 and then with 600 to a very smooth surface.  But when the glue stick was applied to begin attaching the tissue it balled up and made a mess.  So don't apply thinned carpenter's glue to seal balsa.  I found when the alcohol wetted tissue hit the balsa it was an almost immediate bond.  Had to sand everything down and start over.  So Here's the latest pictures.  Got the fuselage top and side and rear bottom covered.  My white tissue was domestic and it tore in a couple of places as it shrank.  So I patched those after everything dried.  Here's a shot of the bottom of the wing being covered.  Making some progress...
Tom
 

fang_tissue_1.jpg (210 KB | 1 )
fang_tissue_1.jpg
fang_tissue_2.jpg (180 KB | 1 )
fang_tissue_2.jpg
fang_tissue_3.jpg (140 KB | 0 )
fang_tissue_3.jpg

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #244 - Jul 13th, 2019 at 9:44am

Kerak   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Roy, Utah

Posts: 2147
****
 
In my "professional career," working drawings are either blue-line or blue-prints...for a reason.  Color detail is very nice...for PowerPoint presentations..."talking" drawings.  Unfortunately, greyscale is just what it says...colors are interpolated in shades of grey, which is not as effective as true working drawings.  All that being said, most printers that I've utilized have the option to print in "grey scale"...no need for a graphics program.  Even then, a lot of color line in grey scale simply disappears when printed.

Another significant issue computer generated drawings have is line scale/density.  When a line is inked on a drafting table...all that is quite visible...easily seen and verified.  Not so on a computer screen.  The smaller the construction subject, the more critical this aspect becomes...take the outside line edge...the middle...the inside?

My point is...creating a truly accurate working drawing "ain't easy."  A contractor would come to me with an "unforeseen issue" and if I knew him well I'd say, "I'm sure you've got a solution in mind...let's hear your ideas."  It's the old adage of "If there's a will...there's bound to be a way."  Wink  It's no different with this hobby of ours.

However...we utilize what we have, right? Right...and what we have is GREAT.  Thanks, Tom. Smiley

Neal
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #243 - Jul 12th, 2019 at 11:47pm

pb_guy   Offline
Senior Member
So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 1404
****
 
Slow progress. One strip of 1/32 x 1/16 above the wing and one of 1/32 sq below the wing. Now to let it dry and remove it from the board tomorrow. Then the other formers and then more 1/32 strips. You know, you can always print a plan in grayscale if you don't like the colour.
ian
 

left_side_1.jpg (77 KB | 1 )
left_side_1.jpg
left_side_2.jpg (75 KB | 1 )
left_side_2.jpg
IP Logged
 
Reply #242 - Jul 11th, 2019 at 4:41pm

alfakilo   Offline
Senior Member
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 806
****
 
I took a screenshot of the X-1 pdf and then used Paint Shop Pro to convert the red color to black by selecting 'greyscale'.
 
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 3 ... 18
Send Topic Print