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India Ink Question (Read 402 times)
Reply #9 - Mar 1st, 2019 at 2:33pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 838
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Two pics showing the difference between coloring the frame with India Ink and covering bare balsa. Is it worth it? I don't know, personal preference, I suppose.
 
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Reply #8 - Mar 1st, 2019 at 1:44pm

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 990
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Here's another option to inking tissue. The user dyes tissue on a frame and then shrinks it over his model. There's not much detail but the methodology is there. I know you are quite far along on this plane but maybe in the future.
click here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wNMTzpbgYtA
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #7 - Mar 1st, 2019 at 11:53am

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 990
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AK - Interesting situation and I can't understand why a glue stick may not stick to the ink other than it may not be cured completely. Ink, like acrylic cures from top down and takes quite a bit of time to dry completely due to the high moisture content. Could be residual moisture interfering with the bond. You are in an excellent situation here in that you have the ability to 'paint' the frame and match the tissue color to it since you are using the same color in both instances. The red sharpie was a good idea and your using the idea should work well with both items matching. Keep in mind the ink carries a lot of moisture and may warp your frame and being transparent may be slightly different color by allowing the balsa frame to show thru a bit. This is easily managed by further tinting the ink and possibly a couple of coats. Looking forward to your results and best of luck.
Mike
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #6 - Mar 1st, 2019 at 9:47am

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 838
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I've had a couple of ideas in mind for using ink. In addition to using ink to 'paint' the aircraft, I've also considered using ink to 'paint' the frame before covering with tissue. Recently, a poster used a red sharpie to color the balsa frame before covering, and I thought the finished model looked good with the underlying framing being a little darker than the red tissue.

When leaving a model in the color of the tissue, I've not liked how areas of balsa planking or areas such as fillets where paper and/or filler was used tended to show through the tissue. I wondered if ink would do the same as that red sharpie.

I'm trying this idea out on the Heinkel that I'm currently working on with mixed results. I used Martin's white and black India Ink to get a light grey to go along with the light grey tissue. The ink colors the balsa and filler OK but I've had some issues with the tissue not sticking when being applied wet. I'm not blaming the ink but it made me wonder if the ink (being labeled as 'waterproof') was keeping the adhesive from sticking well. I've tried Elmers and UHU glue sticks as well as a thinned Aleens Tacky Glue.

I may just chuck the whole idea and consider airbrushing the model if the tissue isn't opaque enough to hide the framing and filler.
 
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Reply #5 - Mar 1st, 2019 at 8:44am

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 990
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Quote:
If I don't completely blow up the project

I can't imagine you blowing up any project, you do very nice work but be patient with this airbrush stuff, it can quickly bring more than you might want, slow and steady with incremental work and success is yours. Just a quick note to inks - Dr. PH Martin is the premier manufacturer and the materials are incredibly fine and smooth but there are different inks offered in his line. Check the web site for an overview of the available inks. Also, many of the inks are not offered in many stores mostly due to low volume but a well stocked art supply store should be able to provide the largest selection. If looking to Liquitex, they are all acrylic based but with some thinning they may work but watch for settling out of the pigment.
Mike
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #4 - Feb 28th, 2019 at 10:07am

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 838
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Excellent info! Thanks very much. If I don't completely blow up the project, I'll post a status report!!
 
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Reply #3 - Feb 28th, 2019 at 8:57am

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 990
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Quote:
I am looking for info on airbrushing tips...thinning if needed, anything to watch out for, etc.

I'm assuming you are referring to airbrushing ink, otherwise that treatise is way too long for this post. For ink or any other medium always do trials on identical material. The ground (tissue or balsa or whatever) will make a difference in color rendition. As to inks, start with out of bottle dilution and  keep your pressure at around 10 - 15 pounds (ROT - thinner the dilution, lower pressure). Inks stay wet for a long time so no problem with mottled or grainey surface. Also keep your distance from the project, starting at maybe 10 - 12 inches, the further back the smoother the coverage and the less likely you will over saturate any area or have areas of varying densities. Also go slowly, build your coverage in small increments and the goal is not to have a completely opaque surface. Also keep in mind that inks have a lot of water and will cause the tissue to sag and wrinkle. Leave this alone and it will come back tight. Look at your result and make a judgement as to saturation and color after it is dry and in natural light. Also, one of the greatest benefit of inks and watercolors is they are transparent and can be combined into some spectacular colors either in a jar over each other on the plane, with in the jar being the easiest as on the plane is pretty permanent. One last item, inks are very forgiving and very easy to clean up but be aware there are some inks advertised as acrylic ink and these must be cleaned out immediately after use or you will have a blocked orifice and they tend to be more opaque. I know this as it cost me the expenditure for an ultra sonic cleaner and several trips thru the cleaner to unblock needle orifice of my Iwata airbrush. As to airbrushes, a double action brush will deliver the best and most even coverage but a single action brush will also work but needs more testing to deliver the result you are after depending on your level of satisfaction. Hope this helps but the single best method is testing and practice. The airbrush will show you very quickly where to focus your practice.
Mike

PS
Forgot to mention that the best time to apply color to your plane is after the major assemblies are complete but before the final assembly. Getting color into a fuselage/wing joint (or anywhere else for that matter) will cause an over saturation of color to the surrounding areas and definitely ruin an other wise perfect project.
 

Have no fear of perfection - you'll never reach it. (Salvador Dali 1904 - 1989)
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Reply #2 - Feb 28th, 2019 at 6:57am

alfakilo   Offline
Senior Member
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 838
****
 
I am looking for info on airbrushing tips...thinning if needed, anything to watch out for, etc.
 
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Reply #1 - Feb 27th, 2019 at 5:43pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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AF...My Bf-109E was finished in Dr. Martin's India ink.  I was following a cookup on HPA where several were using Dr. Martin's India Ink formulas given by Balsabug I believe, don't quote me on that!  Here's the link and it give details on the spraying of the India Ink and how it was mixed etc. Click Here for the Bf-109E build
EDIT: here's the link to the HPA build: Click Here
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Feb 27th, 2019 at 2:22pm

alfakilo   Offline
Senior Member
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 838
****
 
Not much info here or at HPA. Has anyone tried airbrushing India Ink? Tips, techniques?
 
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