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Info On Printing Tissue (Read 407 times)
Reply #13 - Jul 14th, 2019 at 9:16pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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I think that the Draft setting on the printer may be the culprit.  How sharp was your scanned print? That may be part of the problem too.  I look forward to your solution.  Have you tried the Paint Shop Pro route to sharpen and darken the colors?  Just rambling...  I know Don on HPA often uses his CAD program to outline the camo scheme and fills it in with color then prints that. Not sure it that's what he did on this B-17: Click Here
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #12 - Jul 14th, 2019 at 4:36pm

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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Here's a test on a wing panel comparing the tissue against a piece of printer paper. Both examples were printed with the same image.

The dark line at mid-span is where I joined two pieces of tissue using Elmers glue stick. This was to try two shrinking methods. The inner panel was sprayed with Aleens Matte Finish (similar to Krylon) before shrinking. The outer panel was shrunk with no prior preparation. I don't see much difference between the two, and they both tautened up nicely (using Esaki white).

While there was not much running of the colors when wet, the outcome is way too faded to be of much use. Alternatives to consider include spraying the backside of the tissue with white acrylic before printing. Or printing on a piece of light green tissue. I used the draft setting on the Canon printer...maybe increasing that to a higher setting may add more ink for a more defined look. Or using artists pencils to highlight the white and green areas (gotta be a glutton for punishment for that!!).

I'll keep at it and report back!
 

ital_camo_10.jpg (48 KB | 7 )
ital_camo_10.jpg
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Reply #11 - Jul 11th, 2019 at 3:45pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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That's part of the challenge and fun of this great hobby...finding things that will work in the place of other products and traditional items that are harder to source or not as easy to use.  I look forward to your experiments....please share your results!  Anyone already tried these products in this way?
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #10 - Jul 11th, 2019 at 11:03am

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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As a substitute for using a thinned dope coating, I wonder if using a spray sealant such as Krylon Fixatif or Aleens Matte Finish will provide the same water protection?

 
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Reply #9 - Jul 10th, 2019 at 8:34pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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I think most fellas that print tissue apply it in their standard method.  But most use the Epson Durabrite inks.  If your sealing of the tissue has worked then the regular application should work.  But if you're using dope...that's out of my knowledge.  I haven't use dope for years and have had the Krylon Crystal Clear cause my printed tissue to bleed a bit after the application.  Anyone else have more insight on this for AK?
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #8 - Jul 10th, 2019 at 1:34pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 943
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I'm thinking that a 8x18 printed tissue should be OK for a Peanut. Wings about 6" long each and fuselage parts will be smaller than that.

I'll leave markings for a later project. Right now, I'm concerned about how to attach, shrink, and finish this tissue.
 
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Reply #7 - Jul 10th, 2019 at 12:18pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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AK...if your printer will accept 8.5X14 size paper you can use MSWord to enlarge that picture to a size that might work for you...with panel lines and markings.  You could even print it in a couple panels to apply to the model.  If you pull the insert by the corners you can avoid distortion(keeps it symmetrical). Just a thought.  I use this by inserting a picture into the document.(the whole doc is a picture) I love the Italian camo schemes.
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #6 - Jul 10th, 2019 at 7:22am

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 943
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I'll give it a try. I cropped part of the airplane pic and then flipped and mirrored that to make a larger collage that is about 8x10. If I print that, perhaps it can be used to cover the model.
 

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ital_camo_8.jpg (112 KB | 4 )
ital_camo_8.jpg
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Reply #5 - Jul 9th, 2019 at 8:52pm

MKelly   Offline
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Helotes, TX

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That looks pretty decent AK.  You could print the camo, draw on the panel lines, apply the tissue, then apply markings and get a really nice result.

Mike
 
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Reply #4 - Jul 9th, 2019 at 10:12am

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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Here is the result. Canon inkjet. I printed a piece of tissue with the camo pattern and mounted it on a frame. Then brushed on a 1:9 mix of dope as described in the article. No color bleeding evident. Once dry, I then shrunk it with a water/alcohol mix.

Here's how it turned out. The pic shows the frame tissue along side a piece of printed tissue with no dope or shrinking. The colors faded a little and there was a loss of sharpness but no significant bleeding. Not bad but nothing to write home about either. On a Peanut size model, this might look OK.

I put a piece of white paper behind both samples to improve the clarity.
 

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ital_camo_4.jpg
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Reply #3 - Jul 8th, 2019 at 11:59pm

MKelly   Offline
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Helotes, TX

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Not sure if that would work or not.  I doped some markings I'd printed using the Brother printer and they still bled and ran when soaked with dew on a wet morning at the field.  Try a sample and see if the dope helps.

Mike
 
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Reply #2 - Jul 8th, 2019 at 12:48pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

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One item from your attachment caught my eye. The article suggests that a very thin dope application may waterproof the tissue so that it could be shrunk. Can you verify this?
 
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Reply #1 - Jul 8th, 2019 at 11:30am

MKelly   Offline
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Helotes, TX

Posts: 814
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AK,

Best way to assess the compatibility and robustness of your printer's ink is to test it.  Print some off (great tutorial here, I think Tom's linked this one before: http://parmodels.com/printing-on-tissue-paper.html)

Make a simple frame from scrap wood sized to fit your tissue sample.  Use your favorite methods to apply the tissue to the frame (glue stick, dope, thinned white glue etc), then your favorite shrinking method, then your favorite sealant.  Assess for bleeding, color shift, resistance to rubbing etc after each step.  I've tried three printers (HP, Brother and Epson with Durabrite inks).  The HP and Brother inks ran and bled with water or alcohol, but were fine with dope.  The Durabrite inks are robust with all covering and sealing methods I"ve tried - the only things I found I had to watch for are color shift when sealed (they tend to appear darker after doping) and rubbing off the color if you abrade the tissue when it is wet.

Hope this helps,

Mike
 
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Jul 8th, 2019 at 7:32am

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

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I'm trying to learn the basics on printing tissue for camoflage schemes. My questions are very basic at this point...what tissue to use, what does shrinking with water/alcohol do to the colors, etc.

I'm using a simple Canon InkJet. Here is the color scheme that I'm working with:
 

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ital_camo_3.jpg
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