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up in caribou maine... (Read 384 times)
Reply #9 - Aug 27th, 2019 at 10:04am

bigrip74   Online
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 6079
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victor, there were not many areas to fly in Brunswick. Too many trees.

Bob
 

IF IT AINT BROKE DONT FIX IT!
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Reply #8 - Aug 10th, 2019 at 11:06pm

Rekitus Maximus   Online
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re-kitter extrordinaire
(in flux) Caribou

Posts: 76
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ah brunswick maine. 
never been there...  I have family in Augusta and we may find cause to go there one day.

I may have waved at you arriving in Maine. Many years ago,
I went to live in maryland and left near the end of 1972.

when it comes to flying model airplanes, Maine is not as good as Maryland... well, you get more time to build in Maine.

victor

 

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Reply #7 - Aug 10th, 2019 at 6:24pm

bigrip74   Online
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What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 6079
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OOPS! I forgot to mention the years in Maine. 1973-1974.
 

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Reply #6 - Aug 10th, 2019 at 6:23pm

bigrip74   Online
Administrator
What did l do this time!
Austin, Texas

Posts: 6079
*****
 
RM, welcome to S&T and look forward to your posts.

Bob

PS. I was stationed in Brunswick with VP-8.
 

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Reply #5 - Aug 6th, 2019 at 9:54am

MKelly   Offline
Senior Member
Helotes, TX

Posts: 844
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Now that was a good read!  "Pulling wet tissue over a cactus" - sounds like my attempt to cover the Comet Vengeance in my early years...

Look forward to hearing of your further adventures in Free Flight.

Mike
 
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Reply #4 - Aug 4th, 2019 at 9:40pm

Rekitus Maximus   Online
Junior Member
re-kitter extrordinaire
(in flux) Caribou

Posts: 76
**
 
an adventure...

In one story I am going to describe my first three guillows kits.
the fourth plane in this story was one my slightly older brother built...
I search for the correct word to describe my first attempt to build a large Guillows Spitfire.
When I had finally quit trying to glue the parts together,
I re-read the covering instruction and looked at the pictures and drawings.
I distinctly remember thinking at the time the drawings look so neat and even.
my collection of glued parts looked like the Spawn of a Thistle Plant.
I want to add that if the instructions mentioned that I should sand the splinters,
I surely missed it.  Have you ever tried to pull wet tissue over a cactus?
thus the first kit ended... I had a spare prop for the bf109 that I did next.
same ending. This time however I used elmers glue and tried dry covering.
ever seen cotton plants near harvest time?  I did throw it to see if it would fly.
I was thinking it looked a lot like a laundry line covered in clothes in a heavy wind.

it crunched hard and I took the prop home.... two spare props!

my brother and I did build these things in parallel and this was our third round.
how else does one get tissue to cover an airplane?  get another kit!
I built another Spit while he glued up a bf109.
I think between the second and third kits we learned how to sharpen the pen knife we shared
in our building efforts. Because my never to be covered and third attempt was far less prickley.
to jump ahead a little, the uncovered plane was destroyed while my brother and I were
horsing around in our shared room. however,that happened after we (my brother and I)
found a way to 'cover' his bf109.  we found vynil tape! a little thinner than electrical tape
and about 2 inches wide.  we wrapped the fueselage with one piece and each wing
the tail feathers got tape stuck to each side.
Yes! it was heavy. why do you ask? it balanced out per plans! almost...
the nose cone was nearly full of plasticene to get it balanced.

I have to describe the apartment where we lived... we had a third story balcony.
I went out to catch the plane and my brother heaved that plane over the railing.
it looked like a dive bomber... it did a 45 degree glide slope. straight as an arrow.
and in the way model airplanes unerringly do... it stopped on a railroad tie guarding a flowerbed.
it accordian-ed up the nose to the wing. I was horrified.
my brother pulled out the accordian folds. it looked good! and because we can... we did it again.
I mean that. hit the same tie in the same place.
pulled the nose out and missed the tie on the third toss.
the 45 degree landing broke/flattened the nose and we had balsa dust sifting out of the tape seams.
it didn't 'fly' again.

end of story  and an epilog.

the tape did show us that we needed to sand the frames because we could not get the tape to stick
to the rudder and elevator until we scraped off the bumps.
a year or two later my brother found some one who explained how to cover and we used silkspan on at least one kit.
by then balsa dust was an old friend and so that adventure is lost as better but not memorable.
some where in here a cox 049 and a baby ringmaster were built and flown
before I got an actual tissue covered plane to glide... a guillows typhoon.

victor
 

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Reply #3 - Aug 4th, 2019 at 9:35pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11074
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Welcome Rex...I think you'll find there are many ways to do something and as you visit the various boards and threads and post your own builds you'll find your fellow modelers will have many ideas, techniques and options to try on various aspects of this great hobby.  We look forward to you sharing with us...seems there is always something new to learn or something to use we've not thought of yet!!!
Once again welcome!
Sky9pilot
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #2 - Aug 4th, 2019 at 8:47pm

pb_guy   Offline
Senior Member
So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 1504
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Welcome Rex Max. Looks like you are working on one of the Guillows WWII Series. I still have the plan of the Typhoon from when I built it back in the 70's and every once in a while I take it out and consider doing it again, but lighter. Yes, low-wing planes do need a bit of washout. Raise the wingtip trailing edge about 1/16" when building and when tissue is tightening. Best wishes.
ian
 
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Reply #1 - Aug 4th, 2019 at 7:41pm

MKelly   Offline
Senior Member
Helotes, TX

Posts: 844
****
 
Welcome!  Your workbench looks like fun - I love those Guillows 900-series kits.  Look forward to seeing your builds and hearing of your flying adventures.

Mike
 
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Aug 4th, 2019 at 6:25pm

Rekitus Maximus   Online
Junior Member
re-kitter extrordinaire
(in flux) Caribou

Posts: 76
**
 
k...
first post went poof.

here is as best my memory serves what I said
Hi all,
started flying model airplanes when I was 8
and been trying to get better

flown control line RC and free flight in and out doors.

so far I have not had a stick and tissue model go out of sight. mostly because I have only built WWII fighters
from sterling comet and guillows.
I an going to try for that erm.. lofty.. goal with an EasyBuilt Junior Commercial in the not too distant future.

I can't find the post about wash-in : wash-out
that caused me to register.

it is not that I think I have better ideas,
rather that I am willing to post another way to look at the considerations for warping a main wing.

my desktop at the moment.
 

snt-30-desktop.jpg (256 KB | 13 )
snt-30-desktop.jpg

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