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Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk (Read 4818 times)
Reply #16 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 5:01pm

Rekitus Maximus   Offline
Junior Member
re-kitter extrordinaire
(in flux) Caribou

Posts: 91
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that thar is a beautiful stabilizer.
no sarcasim. well done.
except?  are you going to place the S-1 piece?

You can save some weight I'd suppose...
buuuut it is tough to cover an open space like that.

victor
 

re-kitter extrordinaire
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Reply #15 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 4:02pm

Dan   Offline
Full Member
Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 145
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Alfakilo: thank you again for the help! I don't know why the double-pin didn't occur to me.

Victor: that was exactly the method I planned on using. Thanks for your help!

I now have the horizontal stabilizer all glued up! I did as alfakilo suggested and put a small notch in each S-2 piece. The photo shows the better of two notches. Apologies for the globs of glue that are all too conspicuous. And perhaps I went a little overboard with the pins; by my count, there are 44.

Another question must be asked. Sky9pilot mentioned that I want these parts to fit tightly. If they aren't as tight as they should be, what balsa filler is recommended?

I've had a productive day. Time to pack up the other kit parts, find a cat-proof place for my building board, and have some dinner!
 

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Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #14 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 2:40pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1156
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Most will not try to stick a pin thru 1/16. Instead, they will use 2 pins crossed over the 1/16 strip. Or, use a pin clamp to hold the part down. Or some use magnets.

I shop for the thinnest possible pins to minimize splitting. Check the sewing section in Wal-Mart. I find that T-pins are a bit too big for small model wood.

I'll let a glue like Elmers "dry" for several hours. On those S-2 end pieces, consider notching them to give the 1/16 piece a better hold.

I do cut the 1/16 pieces to fit before gluing. Take care to make a clean squared up cut. Some folks double glue this step. Leading and trailing edge pieces can be glued and then sanded to shape.

Pics show pin clamps available from Pecks. I like these a lot. Use them with grip pins from Pecks.

https://www.wind-it-up.com/collections/tools/products/pp698

https://www.wind-it-up.com/collections/tools/products/mw587

 

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Reply #13 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 2:26pm

Rekitus Maximus   Offline
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re-kitter extrordinaire
(in flux) Caribou

Posts: 91
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I expect other will give answers also.

I let stringers poke out a bit long where I can.
this is with the expectation that I can sand them down
to meet plan curves and openings.

victor
 

re-kitter extrordinaire
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Reply #12 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 1:55pm

Dan   Offline
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Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 145
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Thanks to Alfakilo, Mike, and Neal for their kind words and encouragement!

With all the supplies required for constructing the sub-assemblies procured, I got to work...and was quickly stopped. The attached photo shows parts S-2 pinned in place and part R-2 in the lower left corner, waiting for its glue to dry. A third piece of R-2 was left behind, but it was so small and fiddly that I probably won't bother with it.

I still have much to learn, so I'll ask questions before frustration sets in. Three questions have arisen:

1. Am I better off cutting the strips to required length before gluing?
2. I tried to pin a 1/16" square strip in place. It split. I took a scrap piece, pinned it, and got another split. Turning the scrap piece and pinning it resulted in another split. Is this normal, can it be mitigated, or does one need not pin such pieces in place?
3. I'm using regular ol' Elmer's glue. How much dry time should I allow?
 

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Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #11 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 1:02pm

Kerak   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Roy, Utah

Posts: 2466
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Hey Dan!  You know what they say about advice....ha.  Here's mine...simple but effective...BE PATIENT!  Take your time...look it all over for a while...and...there isn't a modeling disaster that can't be rescued...usually!  We're all here to commiserate and encourage. Wink Smiley

Neal
 
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Reply #10 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 12:43pm

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 1213
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Quote:
It is great to have found a forum where a rookie gets a lot of help and no negativity

Dan - Quite right this is the place, lots of encouragement and friendship. Negativity only slows us down in this great hobby and life gets in the way often enough to take care of that, so on to your build.

There has been some discussion regarding stringers but no pics so decided to add a couple of them. Everybody has their own method of attaching stringers and eventually your method will come through. While waiting for that, I've included two photos of a stringer application on my Culver Dart on the turtle deck. I work much like Tom except that I use a knotted string and put it in the first stringer location and stretch it back to the end then put my knife along the string at the second location and make a small mark, then sand the notch and work your way to the end. The string is handy because it can be moved around until it is straight end to end or curved as you need. My sanding tool is only a piece of 1/16th basswood about an inch long and super glued a piece of 220 grit sand paper to the long edge. When the glue is cured I cut the sandpaper to the faces of the piece of wood and you have a notching tool. I sand the faces of the sanding tool as some of the sandpaper may be sticking out and make the notch a little too wide. Hopefully the pics will be helpful and the one from the front view shows the notches already in place.
Mike
 

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"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Reply #9 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 9:12am

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1156
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Welcome to the forum, Dan! You won't find a better bunch of folks to enjoy this hobby with! There are sub-forums to cover any aspect of building a model, and if you can't find an answer to a specific question, just ask here!
 
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Reply #8 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 4:18am

Dan   Offline
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Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 145
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I am glad I gathered knowledge before I started gluing! Armed with that knowledge, I have decided to start construction of the horizontal stabilizer first; hopefully I will be able to remove its laser-cut parts cleanly. When I go to FedEx Office tomorrow, I will also make a copy of the patterns for the formers and "stiff paper" parts. I will also add a postal scale and--eventually--a printer and working computer to my tools and supplies collection.

It is great to have found a forum where a rookie gets a lot of help and no negativity. Many, many thanks to both Sky9pilot and Ian for their generous advice and help before I even began construction!
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #7 - Sep 7th, 2019 at 9:21pm

pb_guy   Offline
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So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 1591
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I recommend that you never cut your plan at all. You might want to build another, or you might have to rebuild a part. Use your printer to make a copy and cut out pieces of the copy. Don't worry about the stringers until after the fuselage is built and the sides joined together at the back. Then you will get some info on how to do it right.

  An electronic postal scale good to +_0.01 g is an excellent investment. You can weigh your wood to determine density, and the finished parts when weighed will give an idea of potential performance.
ian
 
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Reply #6 - Sep 7th, 2019 at 8:24pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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I would recommend sanding the back of the sheet to remove die cut (lovingly called "die crunched") parts. If after sanding the back of the sheet the parts still won't fall out, a little assistance from a razor blade will help.

When you're ready to glue, make sure each joint fits tightly or you'll have a very weak joint that will likely break when covered with tissue.
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #5 - Sep 7th, 2019 at 8:00pm

Dan   Offline
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Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 145
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I decided that this thread needed some pictures, so I got a little work done, even if it was just mocking up the rudder.

I figured this was a good thing to do, as I wasn't certain that R-2 was cut properly. Getting it laid out helped me see that it was indeed cut properly. Two repairs to R-2 will be necessary because I figured the parts would break away cleanly. From here on out, I'll use a blade to remove parts!

I also had to change order of assembly. My original plan was to build the fuselage first. That changed when I discovered that if I cut out the patterns for notching the formers, part of the plan for the right wing will be gone! I may make a copy of those patterns later, as I'd like to keep the plans intact. The fuselage will now be the last assembly I glue together.

I'll pick up a few additional supplies tomorrow and get to gluing!
 

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Chipmunk_Rudder_Mock-Up.jpg

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #4 - Sep 7th, 2019 at 12:11pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stringer placement varies with each modeler... I usually will stick the stringer in place to get an approximate length and then cut it to fit the area just measured with a bit left over (like around the cockpit area) then after the glue has dried trim it or sand it flush with the former at the opening.  I usually leave the sanding till the fuselage is complete and sand the whole fuselage at once starting with 220 grit and then finish sanding with 400 or 600 grit.  You want the surface really smooth before adding the tissue...as one of the new modelers said, "Applying the tissue was like trying to put the tissue on a cactus!" or something like that.  The smoother the better! Hope this makes sense.  Our fellow modelers may have other suggestions so feel free to jump in here fellas...there's never just one way...

Yes, the wing panel was on a scale.  Lots of modelers will weigh components because they have a target weight they hope to achieve with their build.  As Colin Chapman of Lotus fame said, "Simplify then add lightness!"
Sky9pilot
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #3 - Sep 7th, 2019 at 11:38am

Dan   Offline
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Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 145
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Sky9pilot: If I understand that procedure correctly, I would get a couple-few central formers in place and squared up, and put the taper in as I work toward front and rear? Makes more sense than the procedure described in the plans!

Thank you for the glossary. I have added it to my growing list of handy reference material.

Ian: I viewed the video. It was helpful, primarily for showing the shape of the fuselage. However, it didn't answer my question about the stringers. At 0:55 in, it looks like one of the wings is on a scale. Am I correct?

As regards the fuselage stringers, it seems an easy enough process. It is the order of steps that I'm unsure of. Should I cut, glue into place, and sand? Or should I glue into place, cut and sand?

I'm glad I haven't glued anything together yet!
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #2 - Sep 7th, 2019 at 10:41am

Sky9pilot   Offline
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You might find the Glossary of Terms helpful in describing your building procedures:Click Here.  With the Chipmunk your kit has sheet fuselage sides that the formers are attached to.  Then the stringers (sticks) are added to the formers after they are attached to the fuselage sides.  With this kind of construction I'd recommend starting with the formers that are in the middle of the fuselage and then pull the ends together as the remaining formers are attached.  Just a suggestion...
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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