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Guillow's de Havilland Chipmunk (Read 1283 times)
Reply #33 - Sep 11th, 2019 at 8:01pm

Dan   Offline

Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 46
 
A little more progress was made tonight...I started notching the wing ribs. I had previously made a copy of the patterns, so I started with W-1 and W-2. I cut each pattern from the paper with a hobby knife and lined them up. As those patterns were in an area that a fold passed through, I guided off the leading edge. With everything lined up, I cut the notches and did a quick test fit.

I also tried to make a new R-2 piece using a square of balsa from one of the die-crunched sheets. My efforts were not successful. Tomorrow or Friday will see me making more copies of the plans and picking up a piece of balsa big enough to craft new R-2 and S-1 pieces.
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #32 - Sep 11th, 2019 at 4:43am

Dan   Offline

Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 46
 
Yet again, thank you for the suggestions! I will rework the leading edge and fabricate a new S-1 piece. The two S-3 pieces will be a little easier to rework.

As regards the wings, I will build them in two separate pieces. I've already cut the spars and leading/trailing edges with that setup in mind, and I figure (though I could be wrong) that getting the proper dihedral will be easier that way. Compared to putting the wings back on a Piper Aztec, that should be a walk in the park!
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #31 - Sep 10th, 2019 at 11:25pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 10837
*****
 
Ditto what AK said...looking very good. 
Here's a pic of your stab and I tried to illustrate what Alphakilo was saying and suggest a couple other areas with the gussets at the central trailing edge.  If you don't have some emery boards (finger nail files) make a trip to the nearest Dollar Store and buy a packet of them.  They have one that has a bunch of different sizes and grits.  I suggest getting one of those.  If you have a pair of old scissors you can trim the ends of them to narrow them to sand in tight areas. 
DO NOT USE YOUR WIFE'S GOOD SCISSORS, TRUST ME!!!
Don't ask how I know!!! Embarrassed Shocked Wink
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #30 - Sep 10th, 2019 at 9:38pm

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 890
****
 
Looks good! Now is the time to start thinking about how you are going to attach the wing. Is it to be built as one piece or two sides?

IMO, the S-1 joint is a poor design, a weak area that could have been easily done differently. I would have extended the two leading edges to butt up to each other and then trimmed S-1 so that it backed that butt joint. No difference in weight and much stronger.
 
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Reply #29 - Sep 10th, 2019 at 7:40pm

Dan   Offline

Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 46
 
Despite being sore from a couple of strenuous days at work (I have probably moved close to three tons of goods around), I got a little work done on the Chipmunk. It was almost all preparatory, but I now realize the value of having a metal ruler handy. Soon I'll have to upgrade to a larger one. The strips for the top spars were intentionally left rather long; I'll trim them as the wings start coming together and I have a better idea of the required length.

I also freed the horizontal stabilizer from the wax paper. It actually came off without too much grief. S-1 does not fit too well (as described in the article that MKelly graciously sent me). Obviously, some sanding will be needed, both to shape the stabilizer properly and attain a uniform height. I've discovered there is a degree of variance in the size of the 1/16" strips. Some filling will probably be necessary, especially around the leading edge of S-1 (on the left side in the photo).

If all goes well, I will start notching the wing ribs tomorrow.
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #28 - Sep 9th, 2019 at 6:16pm

Dan   Offline

Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 46
 
Wow...all those replies while I was out of the house! I will give the Aleen's glue a try. CA glue, not so much. I have gotten my thumb and forefinger stuck together with CA glue, and immediately went for my girlfriend's nail-polish remover. I will also replace the wax paper with cling wrap.

Peanut Power looks like a great read. I will have to find a copy eventually.

I probably won't get any building done today, but I was able to make copies of the plans (for former and wing rib notching patterns and a template for cutting a new R-2 piece). I also picked up the final tool I needed for constructing the wood pieces: a small metal ruler.

Again, profuse thanks to all for the help and suggestions!
« Last Edit: Sep 10th, 2019 at 7:17pm by Dan »  

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #27 - Sep 9th, 2019 at 1:26pm

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 890
****
 
pb_guy wrote on Sep 9th, 2019 at 11:26am:
One glue you should have on hand for sure is the Aleene's Tacky glue. Not at all expensive, and it is the only glue that works (at least for me) for gluing the plastic canopy to the finished fuselage.
ian


I'm a big fan of Aleens. Especially like the Turbo version, quick drying and clear. I use it to glue card stock and non-load bearing balsa.
 
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Reply #26 - Sep 9th, 2019 at 1:22pm

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 890
****
 
$40 on Amazon!
 
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Reply #25 - Sep 9th, 2019 at 11:40am

Kerak   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Roy, Utah

Posts: 2243
****
 
Dan...and anyone else interested...a few days ago I ran across my copy of PEANUT POWER! by Bill Hannan.  Had it for years...but it seems to migrate on its own around the house.

I'm certain it's out of print now...but if one can procure a copy...it's a very enjoyable reference source not only for peanut scale construction, but stick n' tissue in general.  While there are many reference sources available, this one in particular has been very happy for me over the years...worth searching for your own copy...will answer innumerable questions.  Wink

Hey folks...recall those wonderful model magazines that used to be on the newsstand...terrific inspiration and teaching tools.  Of course...that's what we're all about now on the SnT site, especially for those of us who aren't fortunate enough to have a magazine stack six feet high.  Smiley

Neal
 
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Reply #24 - Sep 9th, 2019 at 11:26am

pb_guy   Offline
Senior Member
So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 1445
****
 
One glue you should have on hand for sure is the Aleene's Tacky glue. Not at all expensive, and it is the only glue that works (at least for me) for gluing the plastic canopy to the finished fuselage.
ian
 
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Reply #23 - Sep 9th, 2019 at 8:17am

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 890
****
 
Dan, I have better luck with plastic kitchen wrap instead of wax paper. I use CA glues and they tend to stick to wax paper more than plastic. In either case, a major issue is the glue seeping through pin holes in the wax paper or plastic wrap. Usually, a little careful prying will free the part.

Most of us probably have a number of glue types depending on what we are doing. Elmers is an aliphatic resin, often called 'white glue', and there are many types to be found in hardware and hobby stores (Elmers, SIG-Bond, Titebond, etc). One that I use a lot is Aleens found in Wal-Mart, a good tacky glue that dries clear and sands well.

There are still old fashioned glues from back in the day. Ambroid is gone but Sigment, Duco, or Testors are still readily available. These are all solvent in acetone allowing us to reset mistakes.

CA glues are very popular and come in a various thicknesses. The quick set up time allows us to build framework very fast, but a note of caution. CA doesn't sand easily and its easy to sand the wood away rather than the glue. Some folks object to the acid odor of most of these CA glues. There are CA debonders that undo mistakes, and there are CA accelerators that speed up the curing times for the thicker types of CA. If you haven't used thin CA, be very careful of keeping fingers away from the gluing area as the thin CA will wick through balsa and instantly glue your fingers to the wood.

Glue sticks are popular for sticking tissue on to the framing. UHU is excellent, and Elmers is good too.

 
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Reply #22 - Sep 9th, 2019 at 4:40am

Dan   Offline

Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 46
 
I believe the Elmer's glue is a little on the thin side. For my next project, I will seek out a glue that is a little more viscous, to better counteract the effects of gravity. Any wax paper that is stuck to the stabilizer will just be sanded away.

Mike, I will send you a PM with my e-mail address. I also discovered that the Flying Aces Club has a squadron that isn't too far from me.

Victor, I'm really liking the Chipmunk, too!

Edit: I have removed the stabilizer from the building board. One section gave me a little grief (I'd cut a leading-edge rib with the wax paper over the plans, allowing a little glue to seep through), but it's holding together okay. Still need to remove the stabilizer from the wax paper, but that has to wait till later...I have to head to work soon.
« Last Edit: Sep 9th, 2019 at 6:31am by Dan »  

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #21 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 9:55pm

MKelly   Offline
Senior Member
Helotes, TX

Posts: 807
****
 
Good start on the Chipmunk Dan.  Stew Meyers has published articles in the Flying Aces Club newsletter discussing how to improve the Guillows 900-series kits including the Chipmunk - PM me an e-mail address and I'll send you a PDF of it.  The article has pictures, text and drawings showing how to make the model more robust and flightworthy without adding a lot of weight - if nothing else it'll be worth a read.

As far as glues go for frame construction I like Titebond II, applied sparingly and with any excess squeeze-out wiped away with a toothpick or bamboo skewer.  I glue up over wax paper and don't have any trouble with the frames sticking to it.  I use Duco cement to glue covered and doped assemblies together.  Lots of choices for adhesives out there, experiment and find the one(s) that work best for you.

I strongly recommend joining the Flying Aces Club (FAC)  - you'll get a bimonthly newsletter full of tips, plans, and contest reports that are sure to get the creative juices flowing.  You can take a look at back issues of the newsletter on the web at:  http://flyingacesclub.com/wp/about-the-fac/fac-news-back-issues/.  Start with the highest numbered back issues to get an idea of what the current newsletter format looks like.  On the FAC site you can also see what events and squadrons are in your area - go to one when you get the chance, you'll meet some great folks and see a wide variety of building and flying styles.  Folks share their tips and techniques freely, and using just a fraction of what I've learned from them has dramatically improved how my models fly.

Anyhow, enjoy your build and the excellent community here on Stick and Tissue - looking forward to watching your Chipmunk come together.

Cheers,

Mike
 
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Reply #20 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 8:03pm

Rekitus Maximus   Offline

re-kitter extrordinaire
(in flux) Caribou

Posts: 39
 
everyone finds ways to get things done to their satisfaction.

I like elmers glue. I do not use it on balsa airframes because
it tends to ball up when sanding.

I have a relative who does not let me share my acetone
glues and solvents with her child...

so I recommend the tight-bond type glues
(the yellow-ish wood glues)  I think the elmers brand has a version.

I like the feel of the 527 glue I can find in stores like walmart
it holds well and can be dissolved for those oh so common re-kitting events ...

And it may be easier to cut new wood and make the parts over.

I had not noticed that the water clean up glues stick to waxed paper... 
even if it does... you can sand it off, right?

Btw  I like the chipmunk, both guillows and real.

victor



 

re-kitter extrordinaire
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Reply #19 - Sep 8th, 2019 at 7:27pm

Dan   Offline

Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 46
 
My main worry about the glue is that I used too much and the stabilizer will stick to the wax paper. That happened with the R-2 piece I tried to repair. I will be cutting a patch for that piece from a scrap of the sheet it was punched out of.
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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