Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Stick and Tissue Logo
 
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegister  
 
 
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 
Send Topic Print
Fisher P-75 Eagle (Read 3227 times)
Reply #19 - Sep 19th, 2019 at 3:39pm

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1137
****
 
While I'm waiting on the Karas, I've begun the initial framing for the Eagle.

1/32" formers attached to laminated 1/16" top and bottom longerons. Side longerons are soft 1/8" stringers. Once more has been added, I'll cut out the internal bracing, etc.
 

p75_build_1.jpg (39 KB | 17 )
p75_build_1.jpg
IP Logged
 
Reply #18 - Sep 19th, 2019 at 1:16pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11347
*****
 
I know these plastic modelers are usually sticklers for details and I found this site that shows a ventral strake on the Resin kit of the P-75a Eagle...Click Here

Also this site that refers to the ventral strake behind the ventral scoop...Click Here
This is the notation below the second picuture below found on the site above: XP-75A 44-32165 with the new (and final) large, angular tail and horizontal stabilizer. However, the aircraft retained the rounded wings. Note the ventral strake behind the belly scoop, and the wide H-blade propellers. The same modifications were applied to 44-32166. The stenciling under the canopy says “Aeroproducts Flight Test Ship No 4.”
Sky9pilot
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #17 - Sep 18th, 2019 at 11:43pm

Kittyfritters   Offline
Senior Member
Stick & Tissue
California

Posts: 650
****
 
alfakilo wrote on Sep 14th, 2019 at 6:30am:
Thanks, Tom! I've found quite a bit of info on this airplane, some of it contradictory. One question that remains unanswered is what may be a ventral fin added to the late model version that runs from the rear of the airscoop to the tail wheel. I haven't found a photo yet that gives a good look at this.

That prop set up is nifty but a bit too much for me!


The really nifty thing was the gun syncronizer.  Four 50 cals firing through contra-rotating props!  With six more in the wings it would have been one of the most powerfully armed fighters of the war.

GM was accused of dragging their heels on the development of this aircraft so that they wouldn't have to build B-29s.  (Actually, one B-29 was fitted with V-3420s and had such improved performance that when the British tested it they couldn't believe that the Wright engined version went into production.)  The original design, produced from existing parts of other aircraft, was a abortion.  The designed from scratch version, after being fitted with an improved intercooler, achieved design performance.  Five production examples were produced before it was decided that with all the P-51s in service the P-75 wasn't needed and the contract was cancelled.

The Allison V-3420 was amazingly reliable and passed it's 150 hours at full military power test easily.  I know because my father was the Army Air Force engineer in charge of the testing. It was also the last liquid cooled engine certificated in the United States, the intention that it would be used in the next generation of super streamlined airliners that failed to materialize after the war.

KF
 

Qua sublata omnia praecepta legis
IP Logged
 
Reply #16 - Sep 17th, 2019 at 7:49pm

Dan   Offline
Full Member
Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 145
***
 
The Allison V-3420 is a bonkers engine. Good thing it's water-cooled; trying to get cooling air to the cylinders furthest from intake air would have been a nightmare!
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
IP Logged
 
Reply #15 - Sep 17th, 2019 at 8:55am

New Builder   Offline
Senior Member
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

Posts: 1184
****
 
Quote:
Incidentally, I'm a certified fan of the Jug

And the Buffalo too, hopefully.
Mike
 

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
IP Logged
 
Reply #14 - Sep 16th, 2019 at 7:51pm

Kerak   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Roy, Utah

Posts: 2424
****
 
These are a lot of great photos, today!  Can't get over that BIG Allison!  Just awesome!  The twin-bank radial for the Jug is something else...but how about a four-row twenty-four cylinder inline monster!  Now THAT is truly indicative of American industrial know-how!

Ambitious color-schemes!  Guy executes a beautiful Gee Bee R-1 and he can do anything!  Wink  Incidentally, I'm a certified fan of the Jug...show me a dolled-up Thunderbolt and I begin to drool.  Grin Grin Grin  Go for it, Alf!

Neal
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #13 - Sep 16th, 2019 at 7:10pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11347
*****
 
I'm a sucker for the bright colors...I like it! Smiley
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #12 - Sep 16th, 2019 at 5:03pm

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1137
****
 
Kerak wrote on Sep 16th, 2019 at 10:08am:
I realize that you've decided upon a dime-scale model...but that's a lot of wing, fore and aft...at something like 24"ws would make a good flier...unique! 
Neal


The longish nose and large wing/stab is what drew me to this model. Reminded me a lot of Tom's X-1 layout. That went together well for me and so I thought this might as well. I've found two color schemes that might work, one actual P-47 scheme and one "what-if" idea.
 

1058678.jpg (196 KB | 20 )
1058678.jpg
P-47H.jpg (44 KB | 25 )
P-47H.jpg
IP Logged
 
Reply #11 - Sep 16th, 2019 at 12:11pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11347
*****
 
I think the bumps and scoops behind the canopy might be carb intakes and exhausts from the engine...Allison V-3420 see pics below.

Here's a link to view of the Allison V-3420: Click Here

Another site with detailed pics: Click Here
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #10 - Sep 16th, 2019 at 10:08am

Kerak   Offline
Senior Member
I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Roy, Utah

Posts: 2424
****
 
Interesting data...was thinking that if that's some sort of turbo intake on the upper decking behind that original canopy (something like a Lightning)...it might have suffered from restricted airflow (due to the canopy itself).

At any rate...was also wondering if the XP-75A would be a bit easier to construct with its angular wing tips and empennage, not to mention a Thunderbolt canopy?  Still a prototype since the design never did reach production stage.  The 75A looks very "business-like," imo.  Give it an orange finish with zinc chromate anti-glare panels.  Smiley

Have you researched anything about the powerplant location...barrowed something from Bell...the Kingcobra perhaps?  Think it used an Allison engine (the primary American in-line engine of WW2...with the exception of the Packard Merlin).

I realize that you've decided upon a dime-scale model...but that's a lot of wing, fore and aft...at something like 24"ws would make a good flier...unique!  Smiley

Neal
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #9 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 10:43pm

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1137
****
 
That initial prototype looked every bit of the clapped together mess that it was.

The original canopy was borrowed from the P-40, but since there was not a P-75 turtleback, the problem was what to do with the rear part of the P-40 canopy. The answer was to squeeze the rear parts together into an awkward concoction that reminds me of the 1990s movie The Rocketeer.
 

Rocketeer.jpg (25 KB | 36 )
Rocketeer.jpg
IP Logged
 
Reply #8 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 6:55pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11347
*****
 
I hear you about all the silver aircraft...I'll look forward to your Pacific Scheme...

I was toying with the XP-75 and the cockpit was a bit of a challenge...found this picture and I'm assuming it olive drab finish but the cockpit canopy is most interesting....
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #7 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 12:16pm

Dan   Offline
Full Member
Navy veteran and A&P holder
Detroit Metro

Posts: 145
***
 
The Pacific War color scheme would suit this model very well.
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
IP Logged
 
Reply #6 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 8:43am

pb_guy   Offline
Senior Member
So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 1552
****
 
From what I have seen of a couple of pics, that isn't a 'strake', but a 'vent' of some kind that can be lowered, possibly to increase air flow for cooling. It appears in some pics of the earlier prototype, but not others. See: https://www.militaryfactory.com/imageviewer/ac/gallery-ac.asp?aircraft_id=420
ian
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #5 - Sep 15th, 2019 at 8:06am

alfakilo   Offline
Global Moderator
Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1137
****
 
Thanks, Tom! That is an excellent hi-res pic of a photo that I saw elsewhere but with less detail. I'm still looking for a pic that shows that ventral strake. For now, I'm going on the assumption that it is a fin rather than a more built up addition to the bottom of the fuselage. My guess is that it was added to provide more directional stability.

I'm getting tired of silver airplanes, my fault since I've been focusing on prototypes, so I'm toying with the idea of doing the model in a Pacific war color scheme borrowed from some P-51 pictures.
 
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 
Send Topic Print