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Fisher P-75 Eagle (Read 3226 times)
Reply #34 - Sep 27th, 2019 at 10:58pm

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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Here's something like I have in mind. Bits and pieces from WW2 P-47/51 color schemes.
 

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Reply #33 - Sep 27th, 2019 at 9:09pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Silver usually comes out better over black...I just remembered you're looking for transparency...don't use black.
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #32 - Sep 27th, 2019 at 3:35pm

alfakilo   Offline
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OK, so I had to bite the bullet.

Stripped the wing panels, trying to paint over the silver tissue was a no-go.

Recovered in white Esaki, and I'll airbrush the airplane in that Vallejo paint.
 
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Reply #31 - Sep 27th, 2019 at 7:30am

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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I gave this a try because I had a semi-transparency look in mind. Didn't work out that way.

I've tried a number of metal-looking acrylics: Tamiya, Testor's Model Masters, Mission, and Vallejo. For now, Vallejo's Metal Color line has been working well. I'll try the White Aluminum and see how that goes.
 

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Reply #30 - Sep 26th, 2019 at 8:12pm

Dan   Offline
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I know the frustration of trying to find "aluminum" paint that looks like aluminum. Most such paint I used in my days of building plastic models either had a metallic effect (as in metal flakes) and/or looked way too dissimilar to the bottom of a soda can. Testor's used to have a line of "Model Master Metallizer" paints, but they were pre-thinned for airbrush use, and I don't know if or how well they would work on S&T models.
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #29 - Sep 26th, 2019 at 2:20pm

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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Whoa doggie!

I got some floral spray silver for the Eagle thinking it would look better than the aluminum colors that I've been using. The spray can said bright silver and was supposed to be semi-transparent.

No kidding! It is really, really bright. And not semi-transparent. I did a test piece first and thought it looked a bit shiny...but maybe it will look better on the airplane.

Bad idea. Fortunately, I only did the tops of the outer wing panels, so that shouldn't be too hard to fix.

So, if you are looking for a bright and shiny stainless steel look, try the Design Master floral spray in silver.
« Last Edit: Sep 27th, 2019 at 7:33am by alfakilo »  

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Reply #28 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 8:46pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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I forgot to say that the stringer is stronger on the 1/32" edge because it give the 1/16" thickness to resist breaking...but that doesn't mean you'll never break a stringer!
Tom
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #27 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 6:45pm

alfakilo   Offline
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One other thing about clamping tools...the soft aluminum hair clips can be trimmed and bent to fit any situation where you need to hold something together. Simple pliers will cut the aluminum to whatever length is needed. When done, simply straighten out the clip for the next use.
 
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Reply #26 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 4:44pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Since I'm not very good at applying large pieces of tissue to things like the fuselage, I end up doing this in sections at a time. So I need something to attach the sections to.

I'm stripping the stringers here from relatively soft 1/16" sheet having set the stripper to approx 1/32". I glue the stringers down with the 1/16" side facing out giving me a reasonable surface to attach tissue to. The reason for the 1/32" thickness is an attempt at saving weight, especially on these smaller models. Am I really achieving a weight savings? Beats me, but I sleep better at night!!  Grin
 
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Reply #25 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 4:25pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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WoW...great progress AK...this is really coming together fast!!!  Are your 1/32"X 1/16" stringers applied flat or on the 1/32" edge?  Koutny applied his on the 1/32" edge and I been doing it that way.  The 1/16" lift off the formers is enough that the fuselage formers don't show when covered.  Got this from the Koutny cookup on HPA: Click Here
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #24 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 4:14pm

Dan   Offline
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I should have known that! Items that can be used for clamping have been duly added to my list of things to buy.
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #23 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 3:43pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Dan wrote on Sep 21st, 2019 at 12:36pm:
[quote author=29242E2923212427480 link=1568406736/21#21 date=1569086067]What purpose do the clothes-pins on the wing ribs serve?


We often need to hold or clamp things together and most of use a variety of everyday things to do that. In this case, I'm clamping the bits and pieces together for the picture!

Those are wooden clothes pins where I have reversed the spring so that the tail ends are in front. This gives a longer and flatter clamping surface. I have regular and small size clothes pins modified like this. In a previous post you can see small metal hair pins being used as a clamp.

Check the local dollar store or Wal-Mart for these.
 

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Reply #22 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 12:36pm

Dan   Offline
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Detroit Metro

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alfakilo wrote on Sep 21st, 2019 at 12:14pm:
Fuselage stringers are 1/32 x 1/16 from pretty soft wood, can't believe I have yet to break one.

You're doing better in that regard than I...I have only completed one assembly on my Chipmunk project (now shifted to the back burner while I await advice), but I've broken three of its die-crunched parts! My new project has 1/8x3/16" wing leading edges and spars, which didn't cut as easily as I figured they would.

The P-75 looks great so far; you are truly a great builder! What purpose do the clothes-pins on the wing ribs serve?
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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Reply #21 - Sep 21st, 2019 at 12:14pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1137
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Basic frame coming along. Fuselage stringers are 1/32 x 1/16 from pretty soft wood, can't believe I have yet to break one. Wing spar is 1/32 sheet, cracked ribs are 1/16.
 

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Reply #20 - Sep 19th, 2019 at 6:38pm

Dan   Offline
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Detroit Metro

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Sky9pilot wrote on Sep 19th, 2019 at 1:16pm:
I know these plastic modelers are usually sticklers for details...

I have found that to be true. Might be part of the reason I haven't tried building a plastic kit in over a decade (cost, both of the kit and supplies, being another obvious one). The author of the article Sky9pilot linked to mentioned that his P-75 kit had a photo-etched fret. The one photo-etched fret I tried to work with almost drove me mad!

Yet again, a fantastic job by alfakilo. I'm looking forward to the day that I'm skilled enough for such a build!
 

Building stick-and-tissue models is a hobby, not work.
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