Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register
Stick and Tissue Logo
 
  HomeHelpSearchLoginRegister  
 
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print
P-38 Lightning 1st static build (Read 751 times)
Reply #20 - Dec 6th, 2019 at 3:48pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
Global Moderator
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 2526
****
 
Thank you for your help Sky9.  It's much appreciated.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #19 - Dec 3rd, 2019 at 11:19pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11092
*****
 
FliteMetal.com  Link: Click Here
I think this is the stuff Skyediamonds is speaking of!

link to videos on YouTube: Click Here
Sky9pilot
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #18 - Dec 3rd, 2019 at 9:15pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
Global Moderator
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 2526
****
 
ib:

Great hearing from you and good to know what I've suggested and posted on my build thread helped.  Really made my day! 

You can easily contact: Ed (forgot his last name, senior moment here) of Scale Aero for his Flite Metal.  His email address is:
[email protected]

Let him know I recommended him to you and others from this site.  He's extremely responsive and will go to great lengths to address any concerns.  In addition to being a vendor, he's also a very active member of various modeling sites and he's (get this) building two giant scale (flying) B-47s with all six jet engines working, right down to the Fowler flaps, detailed interiors, the works.  And of course, he'll be using his own product to cover the models.  I believe the wingspans are around 15 feet.  I could check later.

Several award-winning Top Gun modelers have used Ed's products.  I've seen F-100s models in natural metal finish using Flite Metal and I've also seen P-47s using other products with great results.  They're really incredible and produce a realistic high polished metal surface -because, well, it's really a thin film of metal in the first place.  Vinyl is not.

This is the product I've decided to use after several trials using other products.  The thing I've found is some of the film coverings tend to bubble when exposed to just moderate heat (80 degrees) and that's inside.  After all that hard work, that's the least thing I'd like to have occurred to my model.  It's like having sprayed the last coating of paint only to see it act as its own thinner and the whole surface starts to wrinkle up.  Ask me....  Tongue

There are also several other films.  You can easily find them on Amazon.  You can simply Google "Chrome Vinyl" and you'll be amazed at the wide selection of coverings available and their advantages/disadvantages.  There might have been improvements on several of them since my trials last year and they may have addressed the bubbling problems. 

One word of caution:  the adhesive backing of Ed's Flite Metal is: STRONG.  Just take the very leading edge of your finger and simply touch the surface of the sticky backing and watch how strong it sticks.  You may also wish to view several videos of applications to films to help you see how to apply the films.  Basically, they're all applied the same.  They're all on YouTube.

You may wish to request a sample of Ed's Flite Metal and try it out.  You'll need a lot of practice.  It's not as easy as it looks on the videos.

I'll keep visiting your site.  I'll also start resuming my posts as well as health and time permits. 







 
IP Logged
 
Reply #17 - Dec 2nd, 2019 at 9:03pm

ibscrooge   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Willard, MO.

Posts: 14
 
Skydiamonds I perused you’re post on the Mustang build and loved your idea on the vinyl chrome and it really hit home on your filling with wallboard filler (at least I believe that is what it looks like) as I had the same thoughts of using myself as the weight is negligible and sands easily! Thankfully I have this around the house since I do alot of so called home repairs due to a certain 2 1/2 year old son who is shall we say rambunctious   Grin. I would like to know where you found the vinyl chrome if I might ask as I believe you have just solved my problem with an authentic looking covering and the pounce wheel I will have to find as well. Thank you for kind words on the problems of modeling on the road. I currently use a styrofoam building board about 2 inches thick and around 3 feet long by 1 foot wide that I got at hobby lobby for 12 bucks I believe. Lightweight and thick enough to retain a flat surface for building and it fits in the area above my bunk. Due to my driving schedule I don’t have lots of time to devote to this project but we do what we can right?? I will be following your progress with this project closely as I believe I think your ideas will fit the bill with my current project.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #16 - Nov 30th, 2019 at 7:53pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
Global Moderator
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 2526
****
 
Just a bit more thangy:

That's definitely a "B" model Mustang.  The "C" models had the landing lights on the leading edges of the wing.  If you look carefully at the underside of the left (port) wing at the wheel well, you can just see the landing light peeking out.  The "A" model Mustangs only had 3-bladed propellers.  From "D" models Mustangs, all had bubble canopies.

You may be saying: "Gee, Gary you only have to infill one fuselage.  I've got three, if you include the booms."  Yes, but if you think about it this way, the booms really don't have any compound curves and you can simply wrap them around conical fashion.  You may have to do it in sections of two or three, but its still faster than infilling all three.

Cheers,
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #15 - Nov 30th, 2019 at 7:48pm

Skyediamonds   Offline
Global Moderator
Enjoying life and all
aspects of modeling
Reno, Nevada

Posts: 2526
****
 
ibscrooge:

I used to drive big 18-wheelers for about 30 years and lived in a Freightliner full time for almost 7 years.  At one point, I actually came close to modeling out of the rig by purchasing some dry wall and having it cut to about 3/4 the size of my upper bunk.  From there, when not driving or on duty, I would bring down my "work table" and work on my model.  It never came to pass but that's how I was going to approach my modeling project.  So I know exactly what you're going through and your way of doing things model-wise. You (& Thymekiller) sure have my respect!

I apologize to Tom and everyone in advance for my absence on this site, I've had some family and health issues that basically altered my life.  I'm still struggling with them, but so far things are (somewhat ) stable.  So, I'm optimistic that I can participate more frequently now.

ib: you indicated you're thinking of using soda cans for a metallic effect.  That seems to suggest your desire to have a solid surface with a metallic finish as on a full sized P-38.  My strong advice; don't!  The Guillow's skeletal structure -made from fragile 1/16th  balsa- would not be able to take the stress of the thin pieces of metal.  Besides soda cans (aluminum) is far too thick anyway.  You would need something much more thinner that comes close to that of stiff paper.  There are sheets of brass and aluminum that can easily be obtained from arts and crafts stores, if that's truly the way you wish to go.  I know litho plates are also used for covering to simulate sheet metal, but again,  all of the above listed sheets of metal are far too thick for Guillow's framework; even if they were annealed. 

I'm currently building a Mustang (you can see my build thread under "Yep, another Mustang" ) and my goal is to have it done in a high polished metal finish.  It's in this build thread, you'll find I've done a lot of experimentation with various covers and films.  This is what consumed most of my building time, but I'm glad I did it because I was able to answer my own questions and share the results with everyone here at S&T.  So maybe this will help address your own goals.

As with all things in Life: you have choices.  You can easily grab a rattle can of silver or some kind of chrome metallic finish and simply spray the model.  You will yield a very good metallic finish but over a tissue-covered model, which may or may not satisfy your goals.  Or, you can set yourself up for a longer build time and infill the structure.  It can be tedious and trying at times. but with due diligence and patience, you can achieve incredible results. This is the way I approached my project. 

Not to discourage you, as I only had to infill the fuselage.  The tail feathers were made from solid 1/8" thick balsa sheet (since the model is for display anyway), so no infilling there.  The wings are to be covered with a thin plastic sheet  that I cut out to fit the exact outline of the wings plus a little extra overlap to wrap around the leading edges (easily obtained from arts and crafts stores, if you don't have a fixed mailing address where you can receive packages).  The wings really don't have many compound curves so the cutting and fitting of glossy paper or thin plastic is easy.  Just make two pieces; one for the top and one for the underside.

Now, you're asking "Okay, what about the metallic finish?"  That's where the thin peel-back films come in.  They generally come in rolls of 24" in width and range from 10 feet in length onward depending upon your requirements.  In a nutshell, all you do, is cut a piece to the size you want, (carefully) peel off the backing paper and simply stick it to the desired surface.  It's obviously far more detailed than that, but in essence, it's just what I described. 

I used that word "carefully" in parenthesis because if you peel back too fast or too hard, you can create wrinkles on the finished film that not even an Act of Congress can overcome. 

As a bonus, you can add rivets by simply taking a dull point (T-pin or awl) and using a ruler for exact spacing, push either from the backside for domed rivets or from the finished side for flush rivets.  For flush rivets, you can also use a slightly sharpened very small brass tube say, 1/16" in diameter and push it on the top (finish) surface for flush rivets too.  There's also a short cut to this by using what is called a pounce wheel.  It resembles a pizza cutter but without the smooth razor sharp edges.  Instead, it has small serrated edges around the wheel.  Just simply run it alongside the ruler on either side of the film for the same desired rivet effects.  You can easily see this on my build thread.

I experimented with chrome vinyl & peel-back aluminum (there are now 2-3 different brands).  The one I settled on is called " Flite Metal."   It's all there under my build thread if you wish to visit it.  I encourage you to see it.  I'll be adding more stuff now that I'm back.

Cheers
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #14 - Nov 28th, 2019 at 12:24pm

ibscrooge   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Willard, MO.

Posts: 14
 
Wow I admit that fill in is a tedious process.....somebody please tell me it is worth it lol! Had a crazy thought to try using soda cans as covering for the aluminum look and has anyone tried this?? Getting ready to dissect the opening for the nose gear today.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #13 - Nov 7th, 2019 at 9:52pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11092
*****
 
Looking good!  A little at a time is a great way to enjoy this hobby! Smiley
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #12 - Nov 7th, 2019 at 6:51pm

ibscrooge   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Willard, MO.

Posts: 14
 
Slow and steady got a little bit done. Had to move B5 to the rear about 1/4 inch hopefully this won’t affect anything. The 4-blade prop is for a future Razorback project scratch build. As a “what would happen if “  I bashed the two props from this kit together to create a prop for the Jug😎. If it isn’t broken you can bet I will find a way to break it  ;
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #11 - Nov 4th, 2019 at 7:07pm

ibscrooge   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Willard, MO.

Posts: 14
 
Wow..... I have no words!!! Thank you for doing this. I do have some other photos of his to go through and I am hoping to find a more suitable side angle to get numbers. He was kind enough to date and lable the photos on the back of who was in the photos but neglected to mention names don’t know if that was on purpose or not due to wartime strictures? Thank you again for the great rendition Sky9pilot!!!
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #10 - Nov 4th, 2019 at 1:52pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11092
*****
 
Here's my attempt at recreating the nose art on the P-38 from the fuzzy picture.
Sky9pilot
 


If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #9 - Nov 4th, 2019 at 11:30am

ibscrooge   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Willard, MO.

Posts: 14
 
Already have found several fit discrepancies between the parts and the major one being B-5 not fitting either the plan or model meaning I am going to have to adjust the part by cut and fit. At least the side keel seems to fit straight without waves. Slots for the keels and other parts leave something to be desired but will soldier on. Using shims on the keel slots.
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #8 - Oct 29th, 2019 at 11:31am

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11092
*****
 
From the pics...it looks like it's bare metal with an olive drab or black anti-glare panel on nose in front of cockpit.  It's a shame you don't have any pics of the full side view of the aircraft.
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Reply #7 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 10:01pm

ibscrooge   Offline

I Love YaBB 2.5 AE!
Willard, MO.

Posts: 14
 
Thank you Sky Pilot for rotating the photos don’t know how I botched it up. I have been trying to research the nose art to find out who the pilot was but haven’t had any luck yet. I would like to also be able to get the colors and insignia tail numbers and color scheme since this is all black and white photos. If anyone has any ideas on this please let me know! I could almost guess that it would be green with black on top but there were also some that were tan as well and so hard to tell from photos from 1944. I have also been told that I need to pay more attention to my wife’s side of the family since I erred previously in my new member post and referred to him as my Mother-in-law’s uncle.  Roll Eyes
 
IP Logged
 
Reply #6 - Oct 28th, 2019 at 7:54pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
Administrator
Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

Posts: 11092
*****
 
I wanted a closer look at the nose art...It's fuzzy but I believe it's a skull in a Parson's collar and blk jacket with white wings on each side of the skull. Looks like there might be a lightening bolt through the backside of the art.
Sky9pilot
 

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
IP Logged
 
Pages: 1 2 
Send Topic Print