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Do I Need A Drill Press? (Read 301 times)
Reply #11 - Dec 9th, 2019 at 10:15am

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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I bit the bullet and bought the Dremel Workstation stand. On sale at Lowes for $38. I have a Dremel #395 gathering dust and I'll use it in the mount. Will post results.
 

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Reply #10 - Dec 9th, 2019 at 8:14am

New Builder   Offline
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Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada

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I tend toward Mkelly's solution and the tabletop version if you are doing modelling and the occasional home improvement work. Stick to the usual trade names, Delta, Craftsman, etc. as they are reliable, have different speed ranges, sturdy castings, usually take bits from 1/16th to 3/8s and more importantly nationally available spare parts if needed. Also, the national brands are available locally and don't need to be shipped, no damage there and you will be working same day.
Mike
 

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Reply #9 - Dec 8th, 2019 at 4:58pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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I'm sure it varies with each machine. Mine is not to the degree that I've noticed any wabble in my nose/prop blocks. 

Before I got my drill press and lost my hand drill jig in a move, I made me a drill guide by cutting  90 degree triangle and glued it to a 1/8" thick square base.  I then decided what size music wire I used most for my prop shafts and then glued a brass tube that fit the drill bit and glued it to the 90 degree angle on the square base using my machine squares to keep it sq on the angle and base.  This became my drill press for a few years.  You just need to leave enough length for the drill bit to pass through the article being drilled, like prop blocks before carving, nose/prop block etc.  Hope this makes sense.  "Ve modelers have Vays" paraphrase of what Shults used to say!
 

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If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #8 - Dec 8th, 2019 at 12:43pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Sky9pilot wrote on Dec 7th, 2019 at 10:34pm:
It is Christmas time.  I did use the jig for a hand drill for years.  But last Christmas the family got me an inexpensive one at Harbor Freight Tools for around $69 bucks.


Tom, is there any run-out to deal with?
 
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Reply #7 - Dec 8th, 2019 at 12:42pm

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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Huey v77 wrote on Dec 8th, 2019 at 10:07am:
Check out Micro-Mark, they have small tools for hobbyist. A small drill press is $49.


If this is the Dremel item, it is the stand only. The Dremel drill has to be bought separately.

The price is good but I'm concerned about how stable the Dremel drill is when mounted. Is there any run-out? If so, then it may not be accurate enough for drilling prop shafts.
 
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Reply #6 - Dec 8th, 2019 at 10:07am

Huey v77   Offline
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Check out Micro-Mark, they have small tools for hobbyist. A small drill press is $49.
 
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Reply #5 - Dec 8th, 2019 at 8:39am

pb_guy   Offline
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So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

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For some reviews and pros and cons (and prices) for the various bench-top drill presses out there, try this link:
http://jonsguide.org/best-top-benchtop-drill-press-reviews/

ian
 
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Reply #4 - Dec 8th, 2019 at 7:43am

MKelly   Offline
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Helotes, TX

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I use a Craftsman tabletop drill press similar to what Tom pictured.  Have had it since the mid-90s.  I've found it to be a worthwhile investment, both for modeling and various home improvement and auto activities.

Mike
 
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Reply #3 - Dec 8th, 2019 at 6:52am

alfakilo   Offline
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St Louis, MO

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I've spent time looking over both tools and lean towards Tom's idea. There are many versions of the drill holder type, and while the price is attractive, I'm concerned about the run-out (or 'wobble') of the concept. When my objective is to drill a precise hole, 'close enough' may not hack it.

Does anyone have an alternative?
 
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Reply #2 - Dec 7th, 2019 at 10:34pm

Sky9pilot   Offline
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Stick & Tissue
Kelso, WA 98626 USA

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It is Christmas time.  I did use the jig for a hand drill for years.  But last Christmas the family got me an inexpensive one at Harbor Freight Tools for around $69 bucks.
 

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60238_W3.jpg

If God is your Co-pilot...switch seats...
Your attitude will determine your altitude!- John Maxwell
And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Reply #1 - Dec 7th, 2019 at 7:30pm

pb_guy   Offline
Senior Member
So I'm just a kid at heart.
Youbou, BC, Vancouver Island

Posts: 1587
****
 
You can get an attachment for a dremel tool cheaper. For example, see: sample drill attachment
ian
 

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rotary_drill_press_attachment.jpg
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Dec 7th, 2019 at 4:33pm

alfakilo   Offline
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Retired USAF and TWA.
St Louis, MO

Posts: 1155
****
 
How do you drill accurate holes for prop bearings and other jobs that need precise angles? I'm not very good at using pin vises or Dremels for this kind of work.

There are small drill presses for about $100 or less. Worth the money?
 
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