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Very Hot Topic (More than 25 Replies) Marcoux Bromberg (Read 10471 times)
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #60 - Mar 19th, 2019 at 9:40pm
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Wow.... You really have come a long ways on the racer.  Kudos to you and your easy-going pace to give you some artistic license as you go along.  I know exactly what you mean.  You've done a fantastic job on the horizontal stab.  I'll definitely be watching over your shoulder and learn as you go along.

Thank you for your posts!  Thank you

Gary (Skye)
  
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #59 - Mar 19th, 2019 at 7:53am
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Hi Paul - Thanks for the good words and looking in. It's going a bit slow since there is a lot of design work going on since there is nothing to go on except the very good three view drawings. I'm stealing some functionality from the AT6 but having to design my way into the rest of it.
Mike
  

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #58 - Mar 19th, 2019 at 6:45am
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Looks great Mike Smiley
Paul
  
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #57 - Mar 18th, 2019 at 7:19am
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I think you're already building an rc ship, Mike

A lot of things will come before that ever happens again, like buying a yacht, moving to China, I'll even build another peanut before going back to RC. All the components and the mess, this is the quiet form of this hobby that I need at this point in my life. I chose the hinge as a nice substitute for making one and it will mostly be covered when all is said and done. Wait till you see what I have ready for the piano hinge replica for the flap arrangement. That's a bit down the road however. Moving back to the wing, more small parts to make a bigger part.
Mike
  

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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #56 - Mar 17th, 2019 at 4:32pm
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I think you're already building an rc ship, Mike!  Cheesy Grin

Neal
  
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #55 - Mar 17th, 2019 at 7:10am
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Elevator covering complete and tips added and shaped. Will need a bit of final sanding and then add to the horizontal stabilizer, cover that, add the tips there, sand to final shape and move back to the wing. Counted up the small pieces in the elevator and came out to 26 parts. Structure is very strong now and can handle pretty well to sand and fill.

Been thinking that this may make a pretty good rubber powered model with a bunch of weight reduction. Will have the fuselage formers completed and the wing outline done so with some light wood and a sliced rib wing, may fly fairly well.
Mike
  

( 78 KB | 17 Downloads )
Trailing_Edge_Shaping.jpg
( 72 KB | 18 Downloads )
Covering_Complete.jpg

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #54 - Mar 14th, 2019 at 8:19am
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Hi Neal - Ironing on covering is a technique that allows sheeting to be added to a compound curved surface such as the horizontal stab section of my airplane. The surface curves down in the horizontal direction as well as the front to back direction and I just don't have enough fingers to hold everything in place till the glue dries. All that is necessary is to apply two full strength coatings of white or yellow glue to the surfaces desired to be bonded together and let each coat dry between applications. Then I usually glue some surface in a small place just to hold the sheeting from sliding around. Then set a household iron to a fairly warm setting and literally iron on the covering. The heat reactivates the glue enough to adhere to each other and cure hard. Be sure everything is where you want it as this is absolutely permanent and "bark on tree tight", no rework can be done. I'm using 1/32" covering and the heat is moderately warm, my convention is just don't turn the wood brown. I also bought a small travel iron at our local Value Village for about $5.00 and use it just for this application. I think this methodology originated in a veneering shop by some enterprising woodworker that didn't want to use the usual application of hot hide glue and veneer hammering. It'd a bit messy but absolutely traditional.
Mike
  

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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #53 - Mar 13th, 2019 at 9:05pm
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Looking good, Mike...iron on?  I've missed something.... Huh

Neal
  
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #52 - Mar 12th, 2019 at 10:30am
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Back to work on the horizontal stab hinge solution and it is well under control. Got the hinges in and the frame stabilized so I could actually touch it without breaking it. The bottom cover on the horizontal stab is done and ironed on and the bottom of the elevator is done and ironed on also. Time to trim it up, install the mating surfaces and iron the final covering.
Mike
  

( 93 KB | 23 Downloads )
First_Cover_001.jpg
( 102 KB | 21 Downloads )
Hinge_Layout_001.jpg
( 92 KB | 24 Downloads )
Final_Hinge_Solution.jpg

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #51 - Feb 20th, 2019 at 12:24pm
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Hi Neal - Thanks for the good words and for looking in. I knew somebody would recognize the hinge. I started to build some and went to the model shop before I got started, glad I did. Think I'm going to use thick CA for the tube, maybe can control it a bit more then iron on the skin and assemble the whole thing.
Mike
  

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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #50 - Feb 20th, 2019 at 12:03pm
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You sure you're not building an rc ship?  Wink Cheesy Grin  Looks really "spiffy," Mike.  Nice to find something so "perfect" to "fill the bill."  Smiley

Neal
  
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #49 - Feb 20th, 2019 at 10:31am
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Got more done on the horizontal stab and elevator hinge methodology. Abandoned the round reed outline for a more traditional method. Was finally out to the hobby shop in a nearby town looking through their products and ran across the DuBro display and in there was the answer to my hinge problem. It's a two piece hinge with a steel pin. Drilled out the pin, sanded the barbs off to get it down to about 1/16 diameter. Also drilled out the pin hole to 1/16 diameter to accept the mating pin I will put inside the assembly. Built up an elevator and started installing the hinge assembly and immediately broke the assembly, however this is going to work when I figure out how to glue the tube to the inside of the frame without gluing the hinge in place, one down and five to go. Also ironed on the first cover for the horizontal stab and will wait to add the top (bottom?) cover when the hinges are all installed and proven to work. More soon.
Mike
  

( 93 KB | 19 Downloads )
First_Cover.jpg
( 102 KB | 23 Downloads )
Hinge_Layout.jpg
( 93 KB | 15 Downloads )
First_Hinge_In.jpg

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #48 - Feb 13th, 2019 at 8:02am
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So the Marcoux Bromberg no doubt availed itself of proven standards and methods

Neal - The Marcoux Bromberg came a bit before the North American products but you are right, why reinvent when you can use existing methods. This is why I was drawn to the AT6, similarities in look and function. It was just by luck I ran across the manufacturers drawings of the AT6 functionality, made the job of moving forward much easier. Stick with it I will, the plane is going to see action in next years Canadian Historic Hanger model show. Looking for first place in the display category.
Mike
  

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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #47 - Feb 12th, 2019 at 11:14am
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I was jesting, Mike...(A)T-6, SNJ, Harvard...it's all the same. Wink Cheesy Grin

"The North American Aviation T-6 Texan is an American single-engined advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF), United States Navy, Royal Air Force, and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1970s. Designed by North American Aviation, the T-6 is known by a variety of designations depending on the model and operating air force. The United States Army Air Corps (USAAC) and USAAF designated it as the AT-6, the United States Navy the SNJ, and British Commonwealth air forces the Harvard, the name by which it is best known outside the US. Starting in 1948, the new United States Air Force (USAF) designated it the T-6, with the USN following in 1962. It remains a popular warbird aircraft used for airshow demonstrations and static displays. It has also been used many times to simulate various Japanese aircraft, including the Mitsubishi A6M Zero, in movies depicting World War II in the Pacific. A total of 15,495 T-6s of all variants were built."

Magnificent aircraft!  Worthy of modeling all by itself (check out Bob's effort on site).  Saw an old movie not too long ago in which Tyrone Power (an authentic Navy pilot during WW2) delivered a new one across the border into Canada...a no-no at the time because the U.S. was officially neutral.  Wink  Apparently the Canadians were supposed to come across the border, collect them...then tow them across.  Grin Grin Grin  I've seen a lot of them on the ground and in the air in my life...lots.

There's little doubt that the Navy and Army had some beautiful color schemes 'tween the wars...officially for public relations purposes.  Fun stuff to model...blue fuselages...chrome yellow wings...on and on.

As for your research Mike...feel assured that proven methods and systems were used and reused...no one was looking to waste time and effort re-inventing something that had already successfully demonstrated itself.  So the Marcoux Bromberg no doubt availed itself of proven standards and methods. My guess is that you're definitely on the right track....Smiley

Stick with it, Mike. Smiley

Neal
  
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Re: Marcoux Bromberg
Reply #46 - Feb 12th, 2019 at 8:28am
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Wanted to get out today for a run the the grocery store and some model supplies but at 28 degrees and rain we have a 1/4 inch ice on everything. This old boy is staying in for the next two days.
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I wouldn't know if you were "right or wrong

Neal - I'm not even sure if I'm right or wrong either, so due to the little information that I have I'm stepping into the designer role here. The goal is to produce a plane with all outward appearances of the subject with some functionality. It's a bit involved but with my penchant for details it's all fun and a slow pace, more suited to me so I can invent the details. To your question, I'm fairly certain it is a T6 and is so identified by the Historical Hanger and if the Canadians followed the US Navy methodology for paint schemes, the plane belonged to the section leader of Section 3 (planes 7-9) and the color was (is) True Blue.

If I may indulge a bit of history, in 1922 a system was adopted by the U.S. Navy that is still used today. Airplane squadrons were identified by the letter V for heavier than air plus a letter that designated the mission, F for fighter, T for transport, etc. These eventually morphed into a series of numbers and letters on the side of the plane, i.e. a plane from bombing squadron 1 (VB-1) would have 1-B-3 on the fuselage. A series of letters and numbers identified the manufacturer and type. First character designated the aircraft type, second character designated what number design it was, the third character identified the manufacturer and the fourth character identified any changes or improvements. So, the Curtiss Hawk was identified as F6C-3 or the third sub-variant of the sixth fighter design by Curtiss. In the mid-20s section colors emerged. The section leader had the entire cowl painted, the right wing section had only the top half of the cowl painted and the left wing section had only the bottom half of the cowl painted. There's a whole history of other identifiers including fuselage bands for the section leader only and included chevrons on wing tops either pointing forward or rearward, each with separate identification purposes. Later tail feathers were painted to identify which carrier group the were assigned to. It's all very involved and colorful albeit a bit clumsy.
Mike
  

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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