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Scooter
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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #8 - Sep 16th, 2020 at 4:06pm
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Excellent, Mike! Thanks for the advice! I'll also have to keep an eye out for the orphaned ceiling tile whenever I go into Lowe's...
  

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MKelly
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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #7 - Sep 16th, 2020 at 1:24pm
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Wax paper works great with Duco (and is OK with Titebond II, but asking for trouble with CA).

I use a section of acoustic ceiling tile as a building board - works well, lasts nearly forever.  Home Depot or Lowes sells them only by the box, but there's usually a few damaged tiles sitting on their shelves.  If you ask nicely, explain what it's for, and tell them you don't mind getting one with a corner knocked off or some other damage they'll probably let you have a damaged one for free.

I cut mine into a couple of sections - 12x18" is big enough for most peanuts, 12x26" works for midsize models, and I've got one 12x32" section for larger builds.  Cuts with a utility knife.  I put shelf paper on the back and tape around the edges to minimize extra dust and fragments around the workspace.

I also have a magnet board, but I've found I prefer pins for building frameworks.  I use the magnet board a lot for jigging up subassemblies for measurement and rigging.

Mike
  
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Scooter
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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #6 - Sep 15th, 2020 at 4:30pm
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Thanks, Tom. I've used wax paper many times, but only with white glue and CA. I'll have to try the plastic wrap when I use the Duco for gluing - I read a lot of your guidance in your various builds about using Duco, so I'm going to experiment with that as well, thus trying all the gluing methods during my various builds and learning the pluses and minuses along the way. Smiley

Ian, I found the building board with the cardboard is just a little much for the small FF models I'm building. I was used to building the larger RC airplanes from long ago and sometimes that amount of robustness was needed. I have taken your lead and have laminated two foam boards with a little white glue and double-sided-taped them onto my plywood base and it is working just fine - thanks! Smiley
  

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Sky9pilot
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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #5 - Sep 3rd, 2020 at 9:16pm
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Some are using plastic wrap/saran wrap, some use wax paper depending on the glue used.  I've even heard of some using the clear packing tape that covers well being a good plan preserver as well. 

Some have used the plastic from the back of monokote they've used on their rc projects.  Whatever works best for you and the glue you are using. The acetone based glues tend to eat through the wax paper if too much is used.
  

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Scooter
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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #4 - Sep 3rd, 2020 at 2:30pm
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Thanks for all the input, guys. I was also curious about what you use to cover your plans. Saran wrap, wax paper, ??  I saw what looked to be 2 different types of materials in the pictures you provided...
  

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Kittyfritters
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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #3 - Sep 2nd, 2020 at 10:30pm
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If you are going to use pins I recommend "Profi" pins from the Czech Republic if you can get them.  They are obscenely sharp and have an easily gripped plastic head.

KF
  

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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #2 - Sep 2nd, 2020 at 4:48pm
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I like your thoughts on the building board. I use a straight pine board for my base and two layers of dollar store foam on top. I made a few when I was teaching building to a group of kids. I haven't had to replace the foamboards yet.

  When pinning, I use my pins upright to the plan, especially when building one fuselage side on top of another. And if the pieces threaten at all to rise off of the board, I put as many pins as necessary at an angle to hold everything flat.

  As Sky9Pilot said; avoid pinning through a piece of balsa that will be inside your aircraft. It creates a weak point that can initiate a break or a split. However, if a piece of balsa extends past the point where it will be contained inside your model and will be cut off later, it is perfectly acceptable to pin through it. I do that with fuselage longerons at times.

ian
  
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Sky9pilot
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Re: "Pinning" parts while building
Reply #1 - Sep 2nd, 2020 at 4:18pm
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When I built rc models years ago I did pin through some of the larger lumber.  But with Free Flight (always capitalized) models I never pin through the balsa.  I pin along side or use pins to straddle the balsa stringers, longerons etc.

With covered wings I never pin through tissue covered balsa.  Always pin tightly around the edges, or use pins with clamps of balsa or plastic discs that used to be available for "T" pins you can see in the pictures below.

I suggest reading through the tutorials of the Stinson and Spitfire here: Click Here
  

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firstfuselagesidestart_001.jpg

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And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free. Jn 8:32
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Scooter
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"Pinning" parts while building
Sep 2nd, 2020 at 2:36pm
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I’ve got some more super elementary questions, now that I’m learning some of the building fundamentals. I’ve made a 16in x 20in “building board” out of plywood as the base layer, heavy corrugated cardboard (0.150in) as the next layer, dollar store foam board (0.200in) next, and finally another layer of the same heavy corrugated cardboard. All layers taped together with small strips of double-sided carpet tape. It seems to be fairly durable and holds T pins and straight pins very well. Which brings me to pinning and questions about “pinning techniques”: I’ve seen some items pinned on building boards in some of the building illustrations in these forums (can’t remember where, though). Do you actually pin through the balsa or wedge them between pins on each side? What size of pins to use to prevent spitting (I have the miniature T pins (0.035in diameter) as well as the bigger ones (0.042in), and seamstress straight pins (0.024in))? Once the frame is covered and the shrinking/sealing process is started, while wet (to prevent warpage) do you pin it down through the covered balsa as well as through the covering itself to keep things in place? If you have picture to share, it might save us a thousand words!  Smiley

I’ve built nitro engine powered RC planes in the past and currently simple stick and tissue rubber powered planes using CA glue and just hold things together until they set, but I know from what I’m learning from you folks there are saner ways of doing things! Smiley

Regards, Scott
  

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