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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #8 - Nov 25th, 2020 at 7:44am
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Work has gone on but still doesn't look like the Spirit yet. Got the wing done and the component parts are now ready for some heavy sanding. Next up are the cowl cheeks and the nose block that will be removable and have the engine.
Mike
  

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Right_Wing_and_Fuse_001.jpg
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Complete_Wing_and_Parts.jpg
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Under_Wing_Assy.jpg

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #7 - Nov 6th, 2020 at 7:55am
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The Spirit has feet but no shoes yet, job for further down the line. At this point it looks like most any other framework with the possible difference of the open windows on the Spirit. Will start the cowl cheeks today and begin work on the nose block with the Wright Whirlwind engine. Trying to get a lot done before the cookup starts.
Mike
  

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Spirit_on_Feet_1.jpg
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Spirit_on_Feet_2.jpg

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #6 - Oct 30th, 2020 at 2:22pm
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Hi Bob - Thanks for the good words. I enlarged the PDF to 23 inches and the picture is the first one in the introduction.
  

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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bigrip74
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What did l do this time!

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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #5 - Oct 30th, 2020 at 9:55am
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Mike, she looks good. I like the Flyline plan, but I could not see the wing span.

Bob
  

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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #4 - Oct 30th, 2020 at 7:30am
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Some progress, frame done, stabilizer parts done and wing ribs cut, 34 of them. The nose pieces are supposed to be built of sticks and set at an angle. I did it three times and every time broke it, so the result is an effort to get past that little set back. The center section will be cut away and a hole drilled in the nose of the assembly for the rubber, not terribly elegant but it will probably need nose weight anyway.
Mike
  

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Left_Side_and_Tail_Parts.jpg
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Top_with_Ribs_and_Tail.jpg
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Side_with_Stab.jpg

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Kerak
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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #3 - Oct 18th, 2020 at 11:47am
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Again...great, Mike.  Smiley  I constructed an RC version years ago with an OS Max .10RC for power...silver Monokote covering.  Looking forward to your build...go slow, or fast...but enjoy!  Smiley  Time to dig out that old movie with Jimmy Stewart.  Wink Cool

Neal
  
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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #2 - Oct 18th, 2020 at 11:11am
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Hi Neal - I enlarged the plan to a 23 inch wing span and will simplify the framework some to be a rubber powered model. I wanted to do this airplane as I have been doing quite a lot of reading (thanks covid) about the early aviators, Lindbergh, Granville, etc. It is a fairly straight forward design with 3/32 longerons and I will use 1/16 x 3/32 diagonals. I have been experimenting with foam for the nose and cowl but good ol balsa with a bunch of it cut out should work fine. My research also turned up the Spirit had wire wheels and they were made by the Dayton Wire Wheel Company in Dayton, Ohio. They also made wheels for the Wright bros. I have a note off to them but no answer for about  week, phone call next.
Mike
  

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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Kerak
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Re: The Orteig Prize
Reply #1 - Oct 18th, 2020 at 9:58am
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OUTSTANDING, MIKE!  I'm onboard with you!  I've got the Flyline kit still in the box...really looking forward to your build.  What's the plan for power...Col. Bowers designed it for glow engine...?

Years ago wife and no.one-son were traveling in NY and I asked them to drop by AHC and pick up that kit for me.  By their description of the premises one would have thought I'd sent them on a mission-impossible into the darkest recesses of the concrete jungle!  They were successful.  Smiley Smiley

Neal
« Last Edit: Oct 18th, 2020 at 11:41am by Kerak »  
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The Orteig Prize
Oct 18th, 2020 at 9:36am
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In the years from 1919 to 1927 there was a huge increase in aviation enthusiasm and development. One of the more enthusiastic entrepreneurs was the wealthy hotelier Raymond Orteig. While not a pilot or aircraft owner, he never the less was responsible for one of the greatest achievements of the time with a prize of $25,000 to the first person or persons to fly nonstop from New York to Paris or Paris to New York within five years of the announcement. The prize languished several years and Orteig renewed the prize in 1923 for another five years. In 1927, interest grew in intensity and several pilots and groups began plans to enter the contest two British fliers took off from Newfoundland and crashed in a Irish bog less than two thousand miles and the New York to Paris crossing was a full thirty-six hundred miles. At the time of the first announcement, Orville Wright proclaimed “No flying machine will ever fly from New York to Paris because no known motor can run at the required speed for four days without stopping.” Among the willing participants were Rene Fonck, Commander Byrd, Lieutenant Commander Noel Davis, Captain Charles Nungesser, Francois Coli and Charles Lindbergh. On April 16 Commander Byrd’s Fokker tri-motor crashed on takeoff injuring three of four crew members and seriously damaging the plane and on April 26, Commander Noel Davis and navigator Stanton Wooster were killed in a crash on takeoff in their Keystone trimotor and Rene Fonck had crashed his Fokker in an overloaded takeoff and the duo of Nungesser and Coli took off from Paris for New York and were never heard of again. Two remaining pilots were now in the mix with Byrd’s plane repaired and Lindbergh looking for a plane. Having raised substantial funding, Lindbergh approached Fokker to build the plane. Fokker agreed but required they pick the crew as they didn’t want blood on their hands if the effort failed. That left Ryan Airlines in San Diego, California. The company headed by Benjamin Franklin Mahoney and head engineer Donald Hall. Ryan delivered the plane for $10,580 (instruments extra) in 60 days. Lindbergh flew the plane to New York where the backers met him and the president of the St. Louis Chamber of Commerce suggested the plane be named the “Spirit of St. Louis and the name stuck. At 7:45 AM on May 20, 1927, Lindbergh firewalled the throttle and the rest is history.

Work has started with the laminations for the vertical stabilizer and one half of the horizontal stabilizer complete as well as the rib template for the sliced ribs. Fuselage wood is stripped and work begins today.
Mike
  

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Plans.jpg
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Laminations.jpg

"Skill comes by the constant repetition of familiar feats rather than by a few overbold attempts for which the performer is yet poorly prepared." Wilbur Wright
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